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A “fascinating overview” of neurofeedback and its potential benefits for treating depression, autism, epilepsy, and other conditions (Discover). Since A Symphony in the Brain was first published, the scientific understanding of our bodies, brains, and minds has taken remarkable leaps. From neurofeedback with functional magnetic resonance imaging equipment, to the use of radio waves, to biofeedback of the heart and breath and coverage of biofeedback by health insurance plans, this expanded and updated edition of the groundbreaking book traces the fascinating untold story of the development of biofeedback. Discovered by a small corps of research scientists, this alternative treatment allows a patient to see real-time measurements of their bodily processes. Its advocates claim biofeedback can treat epilepsy, autism, attention deficit disorder, addictions, and depression with no drugs or side effects; bring patients out of vegetative states; and even improve golf scores or an opera singer’s voice. But biofeedback has faced battles for acceptance in the conservative medical world despite positive signs that it could revolutionize the way a diverse range of medical and psychological problems are treated. Offering case studies, accessible scientific explanations, and dramatic personal accounts, this book explores the possibilities for the future of our health. “Robbins details the fascinating medical history of the therapy, tracing it back to French physician Paul Broca’s discovery of the region in the brain where speech originates. At the heart of this riveting story are the people whose lives have been transformed by neurofeedback, from the doctors and psychologists who employ it to the patients who have undergone treatment.” —Publishers Weekly
In Music in the Head, Dr. Leo Rangell explores auditory hallucinations from both the personal and professional perspective. His hallucinations started in 1995 following surgery, and he has lived with them every day since then. He combines his professional training and his personal insight in this scientifically-based, yet conversational book, making these intriguing phenomena approachable for any reader. "We are starting to see a rapprochement between psychoanalysis and neuroscience such as Freud could only dream of. Pay dirt will be found at the brain-mind border. One can now perhaps hope to have an analysis of release hallucinations, equally rooted in neurology and psychiatry, in biology and biography. It is such a synthesis which Dr Leo Rangell, one of our most distinguished psychoanalysts, attempts here. As both subject and observer, Dr Rangell, trained in neurology and psychoanalysis, approaches his material with modesty and restraint, acutely aware of the dangers of over-inference and premature theorizing. And he does so in a style that is easy, unguarded, free of jargon, almost conversational." - Oliver Sacks, from the Foreword
A board certified psychologist describes in clear and coherent language how neurofeedback procedures work and provides numerous case examples that show the progress of clients, from the initial brain map to the various stages of treatment for such ailments as ADHD, autism, depression, epilepsy, stroke, and migraine.
Many different disciplines are analyzing the impact of music today. How and why this ancient cultural asset molds, empowers and makes use of us can only become apparent in a synopsis and exchange involving scientific research. With this perspective as its foundation, the conference "Mozart and Science" extended invitations to the first interdisciplinary and international dialogue between the social and physical sciences about the effects of music. This book is based on the results of that congress. It contains contributions penned by leading scientists from around the world belonging to diverse music science disciplines and in particular covers psycho-physiological, neuro-developmental and cognitive aspects associated with the experience of music. Additional essays provide insights into research conducted about how music is applied in therapy and medicine.
This convention-defying follow-up to The Renegade Writer ensures that freelance journalists get the assignments they want more quickly and for better pay with the right query letter. Successful freelancers and the editors that buy their work share their advice on pitching the perfect story with real examples that earned great assignments from major magazines. Fresh, spunky, and fun to read, this handbook favors a proven renegade approach that gets freelancers more work for more money in less time and with less stress.
Since the beginning of recorded history, law and religion have provided "rules" that define good behavior. When we obey such rules, we assign to some external authority the capacity to determine how we should act. Even anarchists recognize the existence of a choice as to whether or not to obey, since no one has seriously doubted that the source of social order resides in our vast ethical systems. Debate has focused only on whose system is best, never for an instant imagining that law, religion, or some philosophical permutation of either was not the basis of prosocial action. The only divergence from this uniform understanding of human society has come from the behavioral sciences, which cite various biological bases for human goodness. Putting aside both ancient and relatively modern ethical systems, neuroscientists, psychologists, and evolutionary biologists have started a revolution more profound than any anarchist ever dreamed of. In essence, these researchers argue that the source of good human behavior - of the benevolence that we associate with the highest religious teachings - emanates from our physical make-up. Our brains, hormones, and genes literally embody our social compasses. In The Altruistic Brain, renowned neuroscientist Donald Pfaff provides the latest, most far-reaching argument in support of this revolution, explaining in exquisite detail how our neuroanatomical structure favors kindness towards others. Unlike any other study in its field, The Altruistic Brain synthesizes all the most important research into how and why - at a purely physical level - humans empathize with one another and respond altruistically. It demonstrates that human beings are "wired" to behave altruistically in the first instance, such that unprompted, spontaneous kindness is our default behavior; such behavior comes naturally, irrespective of religious or cultural determinants. Based on his own research and that of some of the world's most eminent scientists, Dr. Pfaff puts together well-established brain mechanisms into a theory that is at once novel but also easily demonstrable. He further explains how, using psycho-social approaches that are now well understood, we can clear away obstacles to the brain's natural, altruistic inclinations. This is the first book not only to explain why we are naturally good, but to suggest means of making us behave as well as we can. The Altruistic Brain is required reading for anyone who wants to understand the behavioral revolution in science and the promise that it holds for reorienting society towards greater cooperation.
Sudden, extreme deaths have always fascinated us-- and now more than ever as athletes and travelers rise to the challenges of high-risk sports and journeys on the edge. In this spellbinding book, veteran travel and outdoor sports writer Peter Stark reenacts the dramas of what happens inside our bodies, our minds, and our souls when we push ourselves to the absolute limits of human endurance. Combining the adrenaline high of extreme sports with the startling facts of physiological reality, Stark narrates a series of outdoor adventure stories in which thrill can cross the line to mortal peril. Each death or brush with death is at once a suspense story, a cautionary tale, and a medical thriller. Stark describes in unforgettable detail exactly what goes through the mind of a cross-country skier as his body temperature plummets-- apathy at ninety-one degrees, stupor at ninety. He puts us inside the body of a doomed kayaker tumbling helplessly underwater for two minutes, five minutes, ten minutes. He conjures up the physiology of a snowboarder frantically trying not to panic as he consumes the tiny pocket of air trapped around his face under thousands of pounds of snow. These are among the dire situations that Stark transforms into harrowing accounts of how our bodies react to trauma, how reflexes and instinct compel us to fight back, and how, why, and when we let go of our will to live. In an increasingly tamed and homogenized world, risk is not only a means of escape but a path to spirituality. As Peter Stark writes, "You must try to understand death intimately and prepare yourself for death in order to live a full and satisfying life." In this fascinating, informative book, Stark reveals exactly what we’re getting ourselves into when we choose to live-- and die-- at the extremes of endurance.

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