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For those who lived through wartime Christmases the celebrations during those years had an especially poignant flavour. This anthology includes memories of wartime veterans, of Christmas under fire, in POW and internment camps, in army hospitals, in the desert with the Christmas tree and with servicemen and women fortunate enough to spend Christmas in Bethlehem. At home, Christmas was a story of the evacuee children whose Christmases were never to be the same again, little ones who discovered Santa hadn't called and the wives, mums and sweethearts whose best Christmas gift was the safe return of their men.
As war rages, can Christmas joy be found in Covent Garden... 1943, Sukie and Pattie have left Devon to work at the bustling Edwardes Hotel in Covent Garden. With Sukie on reception greeting every new guest and Pattie gathering gossip from below stairs, these country girls quickly feel at home. Then tragedy strikes and Sukie finds herself struggling, but it is her new friends at the hotel that rally around her and helping her find hope in all the darkness. Only to discover that the hotel is in trouble and Sukie knows she has to help. But as the festive season approaches, can the girls work together to save their new home and make this a Christmas to remember? Full of romance, heartbreak and friendship, this is the perfect heart-warming saga for fans of Annie Groves and Ellie Dean.
The SUNDAY TIMES bestselling Christmas saga. The perfect read for the cold winter nights! THIS CHRISTMAS, CAN LOVE FIND A WAY? 1941, Isle of Dogs. The little community on Slater Street has fought valiantly to keep their spirits up through the long nights of the Blitz. Though her husband Alan has been called up to serve his country, Kay Lewis is determined to give their young son Alfie as merry a Christmas as any other. But when a strange woman arrives on her doorstep, Kay's world is shaken to the core . . . When the woman claims that Alan has been leading a double life, Kay begins to wonder whether she ever knew her husband at all. Then disaster strikes as Alan is reported missing in action. With no way of discovering the truth, Kay will have some difficult decisions to make if she is to protect her family and keep her faith in the man she thought she knew. A heart-warming and nostalgic Christmas family saga set at the heart of wartime London, about finding hope in the darkest of times. Perfect for fans of Sheila Newberry and Rosie Goodwin Praise for CAROL RIVERS: 'Surely one of the best saga writers of her time' – Rosie Clarke 'A gripping page turner' - LEAH FLEMING 'Brings the East End to life - family loyalties, warring characters and broken dreams. Superb' - ELIZABETH GILL
Christmas has been regularly celebrated during wartime. From the Christmas truce of 1914 out in no-mans land on the Western Front, to prisoners of war cooking up their very unique Christmas dinners with whatever they could get their hands on in German POW camps in the 1940s, the privations and difficulties caused by conflict has never stopped people indulging in a little holiday cheer. This lavish gift book, illustrated with one hundred objects, photographs, and works of art from the unmatched Imperial War Museums collection, tells the stories of those who lived through these challenging times, when wrapping paper was banned, rationing was in full force, and children were separated from their families. Also included are tips and tricks for creating recycled presents and greetings cards and recipes to cook a delicious wartime Christmas meal. Wartime Christmas explores the dichotomy apparent in celebrating "peace to all men" while continuing to fight a war of aggression.
Here we trace the history of the Second World War through six wartime Christmases, with fascinating information on how people in Britain, Allied troops at home and British servicemen aboard celebrated the festive season. This highly illustrated and informative guide explores how people made the most of trying times, hanging paper chains in air-raid shelters and enriching Christmas cakes with gravy browning. Through rationing, bad news and good, absences, losses and homecomings, Christmas cheer bubbled up during these dark years. For many, of course, Christmas proved a sad time, with reflections on the years of peace gone by, toasting loved ones far away, and thinking of those who would never come home. But for six years Christmas and the New Year were celebrated with song, jokes, simple gifts, and the wish that ‘next year the war will be over’.
A story perfect for the fireside, Amy's Wartime Christmas is a compelling read, exclusive to eBook from Pam Weaver, author of Love Walked Right In. When Amy Hobbs steps off the train in Worthing, 1943, she's determined to make a difference to the seaside town. The only policewoman at the local station, she's going to have to do her very best amongst old-fashioned superiors who think a woman's work should be making the tea, not arrests. After enduring four hard years of war on the homefront, Christmas can't come soon enough for the townsfolk. While families save up what little they have for the festive season, Amy begins to suspect there is a secret ring of black marketeers in Worthing and is determined to uncover them, even if it means putting herself in danger. Meanwhile, a local woman fears she is being stalked - a man is watching and waiting by her house at night. Who is he, what does he want, and can Amy Hobs step in just in time? It won't be easy to pull together the Christmas everyone deserves, but Amy isn't one to give up without a fight...
Life in a wartime house
This anthology reveals how differently Christmas has been celebrated over the centuries in countries around the world. Traditional stories and seasonal recipes are presented along with songs and legends.
What was it like to live in Britain during the Second World War? What kind of house did the average family live in? How did people cope with the ever-present threat of air-raids, not to mention the hardship of food and clothes rationing? How was a typical suburban home built? What were the choices open to householders when it came to interior decoration and furnishing? How did the war affect the domestic routines of an average household? The demands of a nation at war had many other far-reaching effects on the average home. How did women cope with bringing up a family single-handedly after their husbands were conscripted for military service? How did they use the rations and keep up their families spirits? What was it like to 'Make do and Mend' or 'Dig for Victory', or to sleep in an Anderson shelter? By looking at the lives of ordinary people who inhabited the semi-detached world of suburbia, Mike Brown and Carol Harris have painted a vivid picture of daily life on the Home Front in wartime Britain.
The outbreak of war in 1914 was greeted with euphoria by many in Europe, and it was widely believed that the conflict would be ‘over by Christmas’. In the event, millions of men were destined to spend the first of four seasons away from their families and loved ones. Amid the shortages, tedium and dangers of life in the trenches, those at ‘the sharp end’ remained determined to celebrate Christmas as a time of comradeship and community, a time when war could be set aside, if only for a day. Unlike the famous Christmas truce of 1914, the Christmas experiences in other years of the war and on other fronts have received scant attention. Alan Wakefield has trawled the archives of the Imperial War Museum, National Archives and National Army Museum to provide a fascinating selection of first-hand accounts of the six wartime Christmases of the First World War.
Drama, courage and romance at Marlow’s department store this Christmas
SILENT NIGHT brings to life one of the most unlikely and touching events in the annals of war. In the early months of WWI, on Christmas Eve, men on both sides left their trenches, laid down their arms, and joined in a spontaneous celebration with their new friends, the enemy. For a brief, blissful time, remembered since in song and story, a world war stopped. Even the participants found what they were doing incredible. Germans placed candle-lit Christmas trees on trench parapets and warring soldiers sang carols. In the spirit of the season they ventured out beyond their barbed wire to meet in No Man's Land, where they buried the dead in moving ceremonies, exchanged gifts, ate and drank together, and joyously played football, often with improvised balls. The truce spread as men defied orders and fired harmlessly into the air. But, reluctantly, they were forced to re-start history's most bloody war. SILENT NIGHT vividly recovers a dreamlike event, one of the most extraordinary of Christmas stories.
“An invaluable eye-witness account of life at the lower levels of the German Army during the First World War.”—HistoryOfWar.org At once harrowing and lighthearted, Herbert Sulzbach’s exceptional diary has been highly praised since its original publication in Germany in 1935. With the reprint of this classic account of trench warfare, it records the pride and exhilaration of what to him was the fight for a just cause. It is one of the very few available records of an ordinary German soldier during the First World War. “One of the most notable books on the Great War. It is a book which finely expressed the true soldierly spirit on its highest level; the combination of a high sense of duty, courage, fairness and chivalry.”—Sir Basil Liddell Hart “Herbert Sulzbach’s first person diary focuses on four years of trench warfare and is a valuable contribution to the overall individual story of the First World War, more so than many other such accounts perhaps, as the author was German.”—OCAD Militaria Collectors Resources “A first-class personal account of Herbert Sulzbach’s war seen through his diaries. There is much insight into both his and the German soldier’s attitude to war and events . . . a very readable narrative and adds to the library of sources that are invaluable to counter the legions of postmodern re-evaluations of the German soldier.”—Battlefield Guide
Trapped in a marriage to the wrong man... Struggling to make ends meet, Mary Anne Randall is offered no help by her drunk and abusive husband. A pawnbroking business run from the wash house at the back of her home is the only way she can hope to keep her three kids fed and clothed. But, as storm clouds gather over Europe, can Mary Anne break free from her loveless marriage for what might be a last chance at love...? Previously published as LOVING ENEMIES
DIVTreasury of reminiscences includes battlefield correspondence, diary entries, journals kept on the homefront, stories told to children and grandchildren, more. Intimate, compelling record. /div
A variety of important but lesser-known dimensions of the Chancellorsville campaign of spring 1863 are explored in this collection of eight original essays. Departing from the traditional focus on generalship and tactics, the contributors address the campaign's broad context and implications and revisit specific battlefield episodes that have in the past been poorly understood. Chancellorsville was a remarkable victory for Robert E. Lee's troops, a fact that had enormous psychological importance for both sides, which had met recently at Fredericksburg and would meet again at Gettysburg in just two months. But the achievement, while stunning, came at an enormous cost: more than 13,000 Confederates became casualties, including Stonewall Jackson, who was wounded by friendly fire and died several days later. The topics covered in this volume include the influence of politics on the Union army, the importance of courage among officers, the impact of the war on children, and the state of battlefield medical care. Other essays illuminate the important but overlooked role of Confederate commander Jubal Early, reassess the professionalism of the Union cavalry, investigate the incident of friendly fire that took Stonewall Jackson's life, and analyze the military and political background of Confederate colonel Emory Best's court-martial on charges of abandoning his men. Contributors Keith S. Bohannon, Pennsylvania State University and Greenville, South Carolina Gary W. Gallagher, University of Virginia A. Wilson Greene, Petersburg, Virginia John J. Hennessy, Fredericksburg, Virginia Robert K. Krick, Fredericksburg, Virginia James Marten, Marquette University Carol Reardon, Pennsylvania State University James I. Robertson Jr., Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University
In the tradition of the bestselling Silent Night: The Story of the World War I Christmas Truce, the true story of a Civil War Christmas miracle In the waning days of 1862, Union and Confederate troops set up camp within earshot of one another in Murfreesboro, Tennessee. Christmas had just passed, and for many of these battle-wearied young soldiers the holiday season was a melancholy reminder of the families and loved ones they’d left behind. Bands from both camps played patriotic songs in an attempt to raise spirits, a musical duel that presaged the bloody battle to come. Then, something extraordinary occurred. One of the bands began playing a popular sentimental tune called “Home Sweet Home.” Soon, bands from both sides picked up the tune, and before long thousands of Northern and Southern soldiers had joined together in song. God Rest Ye Merry, Soldiers: A True Civil War Christmas Story tells the tale of this yuletide interlude, which came at a time when the early optimism of the Civil War had given way to the bitter realities of seemingly endless bloodshed. Told through soldiers’ letters and period songs, God Rest Ye Merry, Soldiers is the hopeful and touching story of human compassion in the midst of unspeakable violence.
With the war raging on, can there be peace, love and joy this Christmas? London, 1917. After her parents died in a tragic accident, Victoria did everything she could to keep her siblings safe and off the streets. Working at the Foyles Bookshop with her best friends is a dream come true – but now the war has put everything she holds dear in danger. With her brother fighting on the frontline, Victoria wants to do her part. Little does she know that volunteering to spend time with injured soldiers at Endell Street Military Hospital will reward her in ways she could never have imagined. There are family secrets to uncover, along with love, once lost but never forgotten. This Christmas, all the Foyles girls want is their loved ones back safe and sound... The final heartwarming novel in the Foyles Girls trilogy, Christmas at the Foyles Bookshop is perfect for fans of Daisy Styles and Rosie Hendry.
A picture of Christmas as it was during the Civil War.
In his lifetime Gielgud was acclaimed as the finest classical actor of the twentieth century and Jonathan Croall's biography from 2000 was instantly recognised by critics as a masterful achievement, one that was 'unlikely to be surpassed' (Sunday Telegraph). Since that time however a considerable amount of new material has come to light and the passing of time has allowed a new candour. John Gielgud: Matinee Idol to Movie Star sees this peerless biographer return to his subject to offer the definitive life of Gielgud. For this new biography Croall's exhaustive research has included over a hundred new interviews with key people from his life and career, several hundred letters from Gielgud that have never been published, scores of letters written to him and archived versions of his film and television work. As Gielgud worked increasingly in this medium during the last third of his life much greater attention is given to this than in the earlier work. Fresh light is thrown on his professional relationships with figures such as Laurence Olivier and Edith Evans, and on turbulent episodes of his private life. The overall result is a a much more rounded, candid and richly textured portrait of this celebrated and complex actor.

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