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An up-to-date guide to using vitamins and other nutritional supplements effectively uncovers the positive and negative effects of adding natural and traditional remedies, with more than two hundred new entries, information on eighteen thousand drug-herb-vitamin interactions, and other important tips. Original. 20,000 first printing.
The Gale Encyclopedia of Diets
The Optimal Terrain Ten Protocol to Reboot Cellular Health Since the beginning of the twentieth century, cancer rates have increased exponentially—now affecting almost 50 percent of the American population. Conventional treatment continues to rely on chemotherapy, surgery, and radiation to attack cancer cells. Yet research has repeatedly shown that 95 percent of cancer cases are directly linked to diet and lifestyle. The Metabolic Approach to Cancer is the book we have been waiting for—it offers an innovative, metabolic-focused nutrition protocol that actually works. Naturopathic, integrative oncologist and cancer survivor Dr. Nasha Winters and nutrition therapist Jess Higgins Kelley have identified the ten key elements of a person’s “terrain” (think of it as a topographical map of our body) that are crucial to preventing and managing cancer. Each of the terrain ten elements—including epigenetics, the microbiome, the immune system, toxin exposures, and blood sugar balance—is illuminated as it relates to the cancer process, then given a heavily researched and tested, non-toxic and metabolic, focused nutrition prescription. The metabolic theory of cancer—that cancer is fueled by high carbohydrate diets, not “bad” genetics—was introduced by Nobel Prize-laureate and scientist Otto Warburg in 1931. It has been largely disregarded by conventional oncology ever since. But this theory is resurging as a result of research showing incredible clinical outcomes when cancer cells are deprived of their primary fuel source (glucose). The ketogenic diet—which relies on the body’s production of ketones as fuel—is the centerpiece of The Metabolic Approach to Cancer. Further, Winters and Kelley explain how to harness the anticancer potential of phytonutrients abundant in low-glycemic plant and animal foods to address the 10 hallmarks of cancer—an approach Western medicine does with drug based therapies. Their optimized, genetically-tuned diet shuns grains, legumes, sugar, genetically modified foods, pesticides, and synthetic ingredients while emphasizing whole, wild, local, organic, fermented, heirloom, and low-glycemic foods and herbs. Other components of their approach include harm-reductive herbal therapies like mistletoe (considered the original immunotherapy and common in European cancer care centers) and cannabinoids (which shrink tumors and increase quality of life, yet are illegal in more than half of the United States). Through addressing the ten root causes of cancer and approaching the disease from a nutrition-focused standpoint, we can slow cancer’s endemic spread and live optimized lives.
Identifies herbal therapies and nutritional supplements that support or interfere with the efficacy of prescription and non-prescription drugs
This new fourth edition is designed for use with adults who have suffered a stroke or other brain injury or who are affected by the aging process. While the fundamental format covering such skills areas as visual scanning, reading, observing, information acquisition, listening, memory, and abstract reasoning has remained the same, each of the individual training sections has been revised and updated with additional exercises and teacher suggestions for the teacher-learner team. More training exercises have been added, and the authors address how to use some of the new technology now readily available to enhance the rehabilitation process. The authors focus on the importance of personal choice, responsibility, health, and wellness in successful recovery. The book is designed to be most beneficial when the teacher and learner interact on a one-to-one basis, so that individual needs can be incorporated effectively into the training sessions. Additionally, the exercises encourage the use of basic learning principles such as immediate feedback and positive reinforcement while gradually increasing the difficulty level of the exercises. For each of the training sections, specific suggestions are offered to assist the teacher in finding additional exercises and activities that are personally relevant to the learner. The Thinking Skills Workbook will be a valuable tool for facilitating the recovery of cognitive skills and is written for easy use by professional rehabilitation staff, paraprofessionals, and/or family members. The incorporation of these effective learning strategies, along with the many revisions, will make the book very useful and provide for a rewarding experience for both teacher and learner.
Self-help is big business, but alas not a scienti c business. The estimated 10 billion—that’s with a “b”—spent each year on self-help in the United States is rarely guided by research or monitored by mental health professionals. Instead, marketing and metaphysics triumph. The more outrageous the “miraculous cure” and the “r- olutionary secret,” the better the sales. Of the 3,000 plus self-help books published each year, only a dozen contain controlled research documenting their effectiveness as stand-alone self-help. Of the 20,000 plus psychological and relationship web sites available on the Internet, only a couple hundred meet professional standards for accuracy and balance. Most, in fact, sell a commercial product. Pity the layperson, or for that matter, the practitioner, trying to navigate the self-help morass. We are bombarded with thousands of potential resources and c- tradictory advice. Should we seek wisdom in a self-help book, an online site, a 12-step group, an engaging autobiography, a treatment manual, an inspiring movie, or distance writing? Should we just do it, or just say no? Work toward change or accept what is? Love your inner child or grow out of your Peter Pan? I become confused and discouraged just contemplating the choices.

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