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Over the past fifteen years, the dramatic increase of online self-help legal re-sources, information, and tools specifically developed for use by low-income individuals without legal counsel has been promoted as one way to help those individuals who are caught in this “justice gap.” Unfortunately, however, opportunities arising from the Internet and related information and communication technologies do not accrue to everyone equally as physical, intellectual, and social barriers to information persist. Access to Information, Technology, and Justice: A Critical Intersection, as the first ever book length examination of the use of technology to expand access to justice in the United States, highlights an emerging paradox wherein the technological transformation that has created an increasing array of legal self-help resources and services is also creating barriers to access for disadvantaged individuals. Those who cannot read, those who do not speak the English language, those who are unfamiliar with the law, and those with limited digital literacy skills all find themselves at a fundamental disadvantage. The legal community has only begun to examine whether these resources and services are, in fact, meeting the needs of struggling self-help users. This book builds upon existing work in this area by undertaking an in-depth exploration of how information and communication technologies are changing – and failing to change – the legal in-formation landscape for those who most need this information. Drawing upon the ongoing collaborative efforts of legal aid organizations, libraries, courts, and non-profit organizations, this book provides a framework for removing barriers to equitable access to legal information, with the ultimate goal of encouraging continued discussion and action.
The term digital divide is still used regularly to characterize the injustice associated with inequalities in access to information and communication technologies (ICTs). As the debate continues and becomes more sophisticated, more and more aspects of the distribution of ICTs are singled out as relevant to characterizations of the digital divide and of its moral status. The best way to articulate the digital divide is to relate it to other aspects of social and distributive justice, using a mixture of pre-existing theories within moral and political philosophy. These theories are complemented with contributions from sociology, communication studies, information systems, and a range of other disciplines. Information Technology and Social Justice presents conceptual frameworks for understanding and tackling digital divides. It includes information on access and skills, access and motivation, and other various levels of access. It also presents a detailed analysis of the benefits and value of access to ICTs.
"Technology for Justice examines the impact of IT on the administration of justice. Drawing on a broad variety of sources such as comparative studies, statistics, case law and legal studies on the use of IT in court, Reiling examines how IT can help remedy judicial delays, lack of access to justice and court corruption. She also explores the potential of the Internet technology for increasing access to legal information as a means of self help with settlement and support for court access"--Provided by publisher.
Like systems and procedures in most areas of modern society, the functioning of courts throughout the world has been enormously affected by information and communication technologies (ICT). It has become crucial for lawyers to keep pace with technical changes in judicial systems, especially in international cases where an understanding of procedural variations from one system to another could spell the difference between success and failure. This immensely valuable book has been written by experts who, in various ways, have actually been engaged in the planning and implementation of ICT in the courts of their respective countries. To ensure information that is as homogeneous as possible, and to facilitate cross-border comparisons, the authors have followed a common and detailed `blueprint' which includes a brief description of the judicial system under discussion. The papers were originally prepared for presentation at the first European Seminar on Court Technology, held in September 2000, at the Research Institute on Judicial Systems (IRSIG-CNR) in Bologna, Italy. The Seminar brought together delegates from the fifteen member countries of the European Union, the Court of Justice of the European Communities, Norway, Venezuela, and The World Bank, to discuss topics related to court technology. Overall, the book offers an in-depth, up-to-date overview of methodology, difficulties encountered, and results so far achieved in the implementation of ICT in the European judicial systems. Specific areas of court technology covered include case management systems, electronic filing, and electronic data interchange. Although the emphasis is on EU Member States, a general overview of ICT applications in some Latin American judiciaries is also provided. Justice and Technology in Europe will be of great practical value to policy makers, judges, judicial personnel, lawyers, and ICT experts, as well as to judicial administration scholars interested in ICT in the judicial systems and on the strategy and governance established to increase its diffusion.
Disability, Human Rights, and Information Technology addresses the global issue of equal access to information and communications technology (ICT) by persons with disabilities. The right to access the same digital content at the same time and at the same cost as people without disabilities is implicit in several human rights instruments and is featured prominently in Articles 9 and 21 of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. The right to access ICT, moreover, invokes complementary civil and human rights issues: freedom of expression; freedom to information; political participation; civic engagement; inclusive education; the right to access the highest level of scientific and technological information; and participation in social and cultural opportunities. Despite the ready availability and minimal cost of technology to enable people with disabilities to access ICT on an equal footing as consumers without disabilities, prevailing practice around the globe continues to result in their exclusion. Questions and complexities may also arise where technologies advance ahead of existing laws and policies, where legal norms are established but not yet implemented, or where legal rights are defined but clear technical implementations are not yet established. At the intersection of human-computer interaction, disability rights, civil rights, human rights, international development, and public policy, the volume's contributors examine crucial yet underexplored areas, including technology access for people with cognitive impairments, public financing of information technology, accessibility and e-learning, and human rights and social inclusion. Contributors: John Bertot, Peter Blanck, Judy Brewer, Joyram Chakraborty, Tim Elder, Jim Fruchterman, G. Anthony Giannoumis, Paul Jaeger, Sanjay Jain, Deborah Kaplan, Raja Kushalnagar, Jonathan Lazar, Fredric I. Lederer, Janet E. Lord, Ravi Malhotra, Jorge Manhique, Mirriam Nthenge, Joyojeet Pal, Megan A. Rusciano, David Sloan, Michael Ashley Stein, Brian Wentz, Marco Winckler, Mary J. Ziegler.
Information Technology and the Criminal Justice System suggests that information technology in criminal justice will continue to challenge us to think about how we turn information into knowledge, who can use that knowledge, and for what purposes. In this text, editor April Pattavina synthesizes the growing body of research in information technology and criminal justice. Contributors examine what has been learned from past experiences, what the current state of IT is in various components of the criminal justice system, and what challenges lie ahead.
"This book presents the most relevant experiences and best practices concerning the use and impact of ICTs in the courtroom"--Provided by publisher.
"This book explores the decline in female involvement in technology and other discrimination related to the industry"--Provided by publisher.
"This book offers articles focused on key issues concerning the development, design, and analysis of global IT"--Provided by publisher.
"Justice apps - mobile and web-based programs that can assist individuals with legal tasks - are being produced, improved, and accessed at an unprecedented rate. These technologies have the potential to reshape the justice system, improve access to justice, and demystify legal institutions. Using artificial intelligence techniques, apps can even facilitate the resolution of common legal disputes. However, these opportunities must be assessed in light of the many challenges associated with app usage in the justice sector. These include the digital divide and other accessibility issues, the ethical challenges raised by the dehumanisation of legal processes, and various privacy, security, and confidentiality risks. Surveying the landscape of this emergent industry, this book explores the objectives, opportunities, and challenges presented by apps across all areas of the justice sector. Detailed consideration is also given to the use of justice apps in specific legal contexts, including the family law and criminal law sectors. The first book to engage with justice apps, this book will appeal to a wide range of legal scholars, students, practitioners and policy-makers"--
In Teaching to Justice, Citizenship, and Civic Virtue, a group of teachers considers how students learn and what students need in order to figure out what God is requiring of them. The teachers hear from experts in the fields of civic education, the arts, politics, business, technology, and athletics. In addition, they talk about their own learning and what they want students to know about life after high school. This book, along with its discussion questions, will help parents, teachers, school board members, and administrators talk about what it means to help students work toward God's shalom in a broken but redeemed world.
Egg-heads in an ivory tower? Dreary boffins carrying out useless research at the tax-payer's expense? Computer-nerds? Do such figures make you think of people working in humanities and social sciences in universities? This book shows just how wrong such representations are!
Edited by ASC President Todd Clear along with Natasha Frost and Joshua Freilich, CONTEMPORARY ISSUES IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE POLICY is an outstanding new anthology of policy-focused essays ideal for stimulating policy discussions and debates in the classroom. Featuring all 23 policy proposals and 30 response essays presented at the American Society of Criminology’s 2009 annual meeting, this collection includes essays by some of the leading criminologists in the field. This thought-provoking text presents sections on justice policy, drug policy, terrorism policy, immigration policy, policing policy, juvenile justice policy, and corrections policy. The book’s concise format makes it an invaluable resource for those wanting to incorporate policy into their criminology and criminal justice curricula. Important Notice: Media content referenced within the product description or the product text may not be available in the ebook version.
Examines the most important dimensions of managing IT in the public sector and explores the impact of IT on governmental accountability and distribution of power, the implications of privatization as an IT business model, and the global governance of IT.
"This collection compiles research in all areas of the global information domain. It examines culture in information systems, IT in developing countries, global e-business, and the worldwide information society, providing critical knowledge to fuel the future work of researchers, academicians and practitioners in fields such as information science, political science, international relations, sociology, and many more"--Provided by publisher.
Case studies exploring how experts' encounters with environmental justice are changing technical and scientific practice. Over the course of nearly thirty years, the environmental justice movement has changed the politics of environmental activism and influenced environmental policy. In the process, it has turned the attention of environmental activists and regulatory agencies to issues of pollution, toxics, and human health as they affect ordinary people, especially people of color. This book argues that the environmental justice movement has also begun to transform science and engineering. The chapters present case studies of technical experts' encounters with environmental justice activists and issues, exploring the transformative potential of these interactions. Technoscience and Environmental Justice first examines the scientific practices and identities of technical experts who work with environmental justice organizations, whether by becoming activists themselves or by sharing scientific information with communities. It then explore scientists' and engineers' activities in such mainstream scientific institutions as regulatory agencies and universities, where environmental justice concerns have been (partially) institutionalized as a response to environmental justice activism. All of the chapters grapple with the difficulty of transformation that experts face, but the studies also show how environmental justice activism has created opportunities for changing technical practices and, in a few cases, has even accomplished significant transformations.
The area of Information Technology & Lawyers is a fascinating one. Both from a practical and an academic perspective the opportunities of applying Information Technology to law are tremendous. At the same time, however, lawyers are amongst the most conservative professionals, and traditional late adapters of technology. Nowadays the gap between Information Technology & Lawyers is closing more and more, in particular due to the Internet and the richness of legal sources that can be found online. This book provides material to further bridge the gap by showing people with a legal background what is possible with Information Technology now and in the near future, as well as by showing people with an IT background what opportunities exist in the domain of law. Any lawyer should read this book about the current practice of IT in the legal domain, and what is to be expected in the near future. The book is meant for both practitioners and academics, and can serve in any (post)graduate courses on computer science, law, business, etc. The editors Arno R. Lodder and Anja Oskamp are both affiliated to the Computer/Law Institute of the Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, and before co-edited books on IT support of the Judiciary, as well as the first two editions of the Dutch handbook on IT & Lawyers.
Environmental justice is the concept that minority and low-income individuals, communities and populations should not be disproportionately exposed to environmental hazards, and that they should share fully in making the decisions that affect their environment. This volume examines the sources of environmental justice law and how evolving regulations and court decisions impact projects around the country.
The rapid development of information communication technologies (ICTs) is having a profound impact across numerous aspects of social, economic, and cultural activity worldwide, and keeping pace with the associated effects, implications, opportunities, and pitfalls has been challenging to researchers in diverse realms ranging from education to competitive intelligence.

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