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Ace of Spies reveals for the first time the true story of Sidney Reilly, the real-life inspiration behind fictional hero James Bond. Andrew Cook's startling biography cuts through the myths to tell the full story of the greatest spy the world has ever know. Sidney Reilly influenced world history through acts of extraordinary courage and sheer audacity. He was a master spy, a brilliant con man, a charmer, a cad and a lovable rogue who lived on his wits and thrived on danger, using women shamelessly and killing where necessary - and unnecessary. Sidney Reilly is one of the most fascinating spies of the twentieth century, yet he remains one of the most enigmatic - until now.
Bogen ligger til grund for TV-serien om mesterspionen Sidney Reilly
Master spy was the basis for the James Bond character.
A real-life James Bond, alleged to have spied for at least four nations and executed on the direct orders of Stalin himself, Sidney Reilly left a trail of false identities that made him precisely the type of person the secret intelligence service needed as an agent. Hero, conman, master spy, womaniser - who really was the 'Ace of Spies'? In September 1925, Sidney Reilly journeyed across the Russian frontier on a mission to overthrow the existing Bolshevik regime and restore the Czar. Yet, soon after, he vanished without a trace... Just like the life he led, the circumstances surrounding his death remain shrouded in mystery and speculation. This thrilling autobiography, including entries from Reilly's own secret notes, reveals the intriguing, and often perilous, adventures and exploits of the man widely credited as being the original twentieth-century super-spy - and an inspiration for Ian Fleming's 007 thrillers. The latter half of this dual narrative is provided by Reilly's wife, Pepita, who is on her own mission: to discover the truth behind her husband's disappearance. What did happen to the master of espionage? The Dialogue Espionage Classics series began in 2010 with the purpose of bringing back classic out-of-print spy stories that should never be forgotten. From the Great War to the Cold War, from the French Resistance to the Cambridge Five, from Special Operations to Bletchley Park, this fascinating spy history series includes some of the best military, espionage and adventure stories ever told.
Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Pages: 23. Chapters: Sidney Reilly, List of Japanese spies, 1930-1945, Patrick Stanley Vaughan Heenan, Akashi Motojiro, Yoshiko Kawashima, Takeo Yoshikawa, Fukushima Yasumasa, Hideo Iwakuro, Kim Chang-ryong, Iwaichi Fujiwara, Yoshitsugu Tatekawa, Ry kichi Tanaka, Kuehn Family, Kirigakure Saiz, Yamazaki Susumu, Hasetsukabe no Koharumaru, Nagai Kita, Toshio Miyazaki, Naniwa Kawashima, Yoshio Muto. Excerpt: Lieutenant Sidney George Reilly, MC (c. March 24, 1873/1874 - November 5, 1925), famously known as the Ace of Spies, was a Jewish Russian-born adventurer and secret agent employed by Scotland Yard, the British Secret Service Bureau and later the Secret Intelligence Service (SIS). He is alleged to have spied for at least four nations. His notoriety during the 1920s was created in part by his friend, British diplomat and journalist Sir Robert Bruce Lockhart, who sensationalised their thwarted operation to overthrow the Bolshevik government in 1918. After Reilly's death, the London Evening Standard published in May, 1931, a Master Spy serial glorifying his exploits. Later, Ian Fleming would use Reilly as a model for James Bond. Today, many historians consider Reilly to be the first 20th century super-spy. Much of what is thought to be known about him could be false, as Reilly was a master of deception, and most of his life is shrouded in legend. The origins, identities, and activities of Sidney George Reilly have befuddled researchers and intelligence agencies for more than a century; hence, much of his purported life and many of his notorious exploits should be cautiously examined. Reilly himself told several versions of his origins to confuse and mislead investigators. Reilly claimed to be the son of (a) an Irish merchant seaman, (b) an Irish clergyman, and (c) an aristocratic landowner and habitu of the Imperial court of Tsar Alexande...
Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Pages: 44. Chapters: Carl von Ossietzky, Joan Pujol Garcia, Mutt and Jeff, Sidney Reilly, Fritz Joubert Duquesne, Alexander Parvus, Kurt Frederick Ludwig, Ignaz Trebitsch-Lincoln, Oskar von Niedermayer, Stephanie von Hohenlohe, Gunther Schutz, Norman Baillie-Stewart, Wilhelm Wassmuss, Franz von Rintelen, Trow Ghyll skeleton, Carl Hans Lody, Du an Popov, Hermann Gortz, Erich Gimpel, Christian Andreas Kasebier, William G. Sebold, Arthur Owens, Anna Wolkoff, Lothar Witzke, Vincent Kraft, Kuehn Family, Wilhelm Stieber, Herambalal Gupta, Mathilde Carre, Karl Moor, Willem Ter Braak, Hans Sommer, Oren, Heinrich Albert, Hans Clemens, Erika Wendt, Karl Boy-Ed, Paul Reckzeh. Excerpt: Lieutenant Sidney George Reilly, MC (c. March 24, 1873/1874 - November 5, 1925), famously known as the Ace of Spies, was a Jewish Russian-born adventurer and secret agent employed by Scotland Yard, the British Secret Service Bureau and later the Secret Intelligence Service (SIS). He is alleged to have spied for at least four nations. His notoriety during the 1920s was created in part by his friend, British diplomat and journalist Sir Robert Bruce Lockhart, who sensationalised their thwarted operation to overthrow the Bolshevik government in 1918. After Reilly's death, the London Evening Standard published in May, 1931, a Master Spy serial glorifying his exploits. Later, Ian Fleming would use Reilly as a model for James Bond. Today, many historians consider Reilly to be the first 20th century super-spy. Much of what is thought to be known about him could be false, as Reilly was a master of deception, and most of his life is shrouded in legend. The origins, identities, and activities of Sidney George Reilly have befuddled researchers and intelligence agencies for more than a century; hence, much of his purported life and many of his notorious exploits should be...
Spies and spymasters have had a crucial role to play ever since man first learned to rage war. This book tells the stories of some of the world's most infamous spies and spy organisations including the Portland spy Ring, the secret of the KGB Sex Spies, Mata Hari and Sidney Reilly - Ace of spies
A Rocking-Horse Catholic: A Caryll Houselander Reader is a selection of the writings of a modern Catholic laywomen and mystic, with a biographical introduction by the editor, Marie Anne Mayeski.
Ethel Lilian Voynich was the girlfriend of Sidney Rosenblum, otherwise known in Britain as Sidney Reilly or Reilly Ace of Spies. With Rosenblum's last £300 the couple went off to Italy. Here under the Mediterranean sun and under the influence of the Roman Catholic religion, which touched every facet of Italian life and awoke emotionally charged memories of his Catholic upbringing, Sidney bared his soul to his mistress. She is best known for her first novel, "The Gadfly." In Russia, the name of Ethel Lilian Voynich is bracketed with Shakespeare and Dickens as being amongst the greatest writers. She later married a Polish revolutionary who fought for Poland's freedom from Russian rule and died in New York in 1960 at the age of ninety-six.
Before espionage entered the era of modern technology, there was the age of George Alexander Hill: a time of swashbuckling secret agents, swordsticks and secret assignations with deadly female spies. The daring escapades of some of the first members of Britain's secret service are revealed in this account of perilous adventure and audacious missions in Imperial and revolutionary Russia. First published in 1932, Hill's rip-roaring narrative recounts tales of his fellow operatives Arthur Ransome - author of Swallows and Amazons and one of the most effective British spies in Russia - and Sidney Reilly - so-called 'Ace of Spies' and architect of a thwarted plot to assassinate the Bolshevik leadership. Unavailable for decades, this lost classic offers fascinating portraits of a world unfathomable to those growing up against a backdrop of WikiLeaks and cyber espionage, and of true-life characters whose exploits were so extraordinary that they have entered the realm of legend.
Here is the ultimate inside history of twentieth-century intelligence gathering and covert activity. Unrivalled in its scope and as readable as any spy novel, A Century of Spies travels from tsarist Russia and the earliest days of the British Secret Service to the crises and uncertainties of today's post-Cold War world, offering an unsurpassed overview of the role of modern intelligence in every part of the globe. From spies and secret agents to the latest high-tech wizardry in signals and imagery surveillance, it provides fascinating, in-depth coverage of important operations of United States, British, Russian, Israeli, Chinese, German, and French intelligence services, and much more. All the key elements of modern intelligence activity are here. An expert whose books have received high marks from the intelligence and military communities, Jeffrey Richelson covers the crucial role of spy technology from the days of Marconi and the Wright Brothers to today's dazzling array of Space Age satellites, aircraft, and ground stations. He provides vivid portraits of spymasters, spies, and defectors--including Sidney Reilly, Herbert Yardley, Kim Philby, James Angleton, Markus Wolf, Reinhard Gehlen, Vitaly Yurchenko, Jonathan Pollard, and many others. Richelson paints a colorful portrait of World War I's spies and sabateurs, and illuminates the secret maneuvering that helped determine the outcome of the war on land, at sea, and on the diplomatic front; he investigates the enormous importance of intelligence operations in both the European and Pacific theaters in World War II, from the work of Allied and Nazi agents to the "black magic" of U.S. and British code breakers; and he gives us a complete overview of intelligence during the length of the Cold War, from superpower espionage and spy scandals to covert action and secret wars. A final chapter probes the still-evolving role of intelligence work in the new world of disorder and ethnic conflict, from the high-tech wonders of the Gulf War to the surprising involvement of the French government in industrial espionage. Comprehensive, authoritative, and addictively readable, A Century of Spies is filled with new information on a variety of subjects--from the activities of the American Black Chamber in the 1920s to intelligence collection during the Cuban missile crisis to Soviet intelligence and covert action operations. It is an essential volume for anyone interested in military history, espionage and adventure, and world affairs.
In Spies We Trust reveals the full story of the Anglo-American intelligence relationship - ranging from the deceits of World War I to the mendacities of 9/11 - for the first time. Why did we ever start trusting spies? It all started a hundred years ago. First we put our faith in them to help win wars, then we turned against the bloodshed and expense, and asked our spies instead to deliver peace and security. By the end of World War II, Britain and America were cooperating effectively to that end. At its peak in the 1940s and 1950s, the 'special intelligence relationship' contributed to national and international security in what was an Anglo-American century. But from the 1960s this 'special relationship' went into decline. Britain weakened, American attitudes changed, and the fall of the Soviet Union dissolved the fear that bound London and Washington together. A series of intelligence scandals along the way further eroded public confidence. Yet even in these years, the US offered its old intelligence partner a vital gift: congressional attempts to oversee the CIA in the 1970s encouraged subsequent moves towards more open government in Britain and beyond. So which way do we look now? And what are the alternatives to the British-American intelligence relationship that held sway in the West for so much of the twentieth century? Rhodri Jeffreys-Jones shows that there are a number - the most promising of which, astonishingly, remain largely unknown to the Anglophone world.
From the capture of Sidney Reilly, the 'Ace of Spies', by Lenin's Bolsheviks in 1925, to the deportation from the USA of Anna Chapman, the 'Redhead under the Bed', in 2010, Kremlin and Western spymasters have battled for supremacy for nearly a century. In Deception Edward Lucas uncovers the real story of Chapman and her colleagues in Britain and America, unveiling their clandestine missions and the spy-hunt that led to their downfall. It reveals unknown triumphs and disasters of Western intelligence in the Cold War, providing the background to the new world of industrial and political espionage. To tell the story of post-Soviet espionage, Lucas draws on exclusive interviews with Russia's top NATO spy, Herman Simm, and unveils the horrific treatment of a Moscow lawyer who dared to challenge the ruling criminal syndicate there. Once the threat from Moscow was international communism; now it comes from the siloviki, Russia's ruthless 'men of power'.
To read the mind of your enemy, to turn his psyche to your own purpose, and to claim victory without ever landing a blow, these are the secrets of I-Hsing. Masters of I-Hsing's greatest weapon, the Mind-Fist, gain more than an advantage over their foes, they gain control of them. Dr. Haha Lung adds to his canon of easy-to-understand, relevant martial arts instruction with this indispensable guide to dominating your enemy's mind. In his previous classics, Mind Control and Mind Manipulation, he laid the groundwork for smashing your enemy's mental defenses. In Mind Penetration, Dr. Lung teaches the skills and techniques behind this seemingly supernatural ability to bend anyone to your will. In this comprehensive guide to I-Hsing you will: • Explore the origin and history of mind manipulation • Discover its practice in the ancient Far East and in the modern West • Learn how to control the minds of your enemies • Gain confidence and knowledge through clear descriptions and helpful illustrations Dr. Haha Lung is the author of more than a dozen books on martial arts, including The Nine Halls of Death, Assassin!, Mind Manipulation, Ninja Shadowland, Knights of Darkness, Mind Control: The Ancient Art of Psychological Warfare, and The Lost Fighting Arts of Vietnam. [FOR ACADEMIC STUDY ONLY]
This authoritative and comprehensive guide to key people and events in Anglo-Jewish history stretches from Cromwell's re-admittance of the Jews in 1656 to the present day and contains nearly 3000 entries, the vast majority of which are not featured in any other sources.
British master spy Sidney Reilly tries to prevent Lenin from taking power over Russia in 1918. He fails but soon discovers that he was betrayed. After investigating, Reilly goes back to Russia on one final high-stakes gamble-- and disappears forever. Both SIS and KGB are completely stymied and invent "legends" to protect their interests. Private War, based on original research independent of the SIS and KGB, is the first telling of what really happened. Both Robin Lockhart, author of "Reilly: Ace of Spies" and Lev Bezymensky, the Soviet go-to man for information on Reilly, endorsed the book.
In the immediate aftermath of the Revolution, the Western powers were anxious to prevent the spread of Bolshevism across Europe. Lenin and Trotsky were equally anxious that the Communist vision they were busy introducing in Russia should do just that. But neither side knew anything about the other. The revolution and Russia’s withdrawal from the First World War had ensured a diplomatic exodus from Moscow and the usual routes to vital information had been closed off. Into this void stepped an extraordinary collection of opportunists, journalists and spies – sometimes indeed journalists who were spies and vice versa: in Moscow Britain’s Arthur Ransome, the American John Reed and Sidney Reilly – ‘Ace of Spies’ – all traded information and brokered deals between Russia and the West; in Berlin, Paris and London, the likes of Maxim Litvinov, Adolf Ioffe and Kamenev tried to infiltrate the political elite and influence foreign policy to the Bolshevik’s advantage. Robert Service, acclaimed historian and one of our finest commentators on matters Soviet, turns his meticulous eye to this ragtag group of people and, with narrative flair and impeccable research, reveals one of the great untold stories of the twentieth century.
This is the amazing true story of the real 'M', William Melville, MI5's founding father and the inspiration for Ian Flemings's character in "James Bond". Melville was one of the most influential counter-espionage figures of the twentieth century. From a tiny outfit based in Victoria Street, London, the counter-intelligence organisation that Melville lobbied the Government to create is today a household name and one of the world's leading intelligence agencies. He was perfect for the job, a velvet-gloved hardman who had run Scotland Yard's Special Branch and whose career had already taken in some of London's great crime dramas including the Jack the Ripper Investigation, countering Irish Republican terrorism, assassination attempts on Queen Victoria and anarchist bomb plots. Now, with the help of recently declassified records, family material and documents that have still not officially seen the light of day, the story of his Secret Service career - including the breaking of German spy rings prior to the outbreak of World War I - can finally be told.

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