Download Free Advice For New Faculty Members Book in PDF and EPUB Free Download. You can read online Advice For New Faculty Members and write the review.

Nihil nimus is a guide to the start of a successful academic career. As its title suggests (nothing in excess), it advocates moderation in ways of working.--From publisher description
For the first time in decades, most American campuses are in the midst of hiring large groups of new faculty. As competition for the most qualified candidates increases, institutions must work harder than ever to attract and retain the best and most diverse prospects. This often requires investing considerable resources in recruitment and hiring--and makes it imperative that new hires are not lost to competitors or to unhappy or unproductive beginnings. In this book, Robert Boice offers a range of proven support strategies designed to help new faculty thrive--from campuswide programs for nurturing newcomers to projects that help them to help themselves. Boice identifies the major challenges facing most new faculty--teaching, scholarly writing, and simply fitting in as colleagues--and provides tested solutions for helping them cope. He outlines a structured mentoring program to build collegiality through social support networks. And he presents specific techniques for helping new faculty find time, fluency, and balance as writers, including advice on dealing with editorial evaluations or rejections. The author also details a variety of self-help projects, including exercise and mood management groups run largely by new faculty, as well as faculty handbooks and newsletters. And perhaps most important, he tells how to gain the crucial support of department chairs, deans, and other administrators, secure funds to get programs off the ground, and keep new programs manageable and successful.
The "Survival Guide for New Faculty Members: Outlining the Keys to Success for Promotion and Tenure" provides new faculty members with practical, down-to-earth wisdom and suggestions for successfully working through to tenure and promotion. The authors--both successful and experienced administrators and experts in higher education--have provided an extremely well-organized and useful guide for new faculty members. It focuses on all aspects of becoming a new faculty member including the various expectations in completing a successful journey toward promotion and tenure. The book underscores the importance of recognizing the three facets of faculty life of teaching, research, and service. This volume clearly sets out, compares, and separates those three components with clarity and provides very useful advice for putting the three together. Taken together with the chapters on "Documenting Your Progress" and "Promotion and Tenure," new faculty are provided with a solid, practical introduction to building a foundation for success in higher education. Feedback and tips are also provided within each chapter. It is written in a style that readers will be able to easily comprehend and understand and is supported with many examples. In addition, the information can be easily applied to new faculty at various types of institutions of higher education. A foreword by Charles R. McGuire, a preface, seven appendices, and an index are included.
Successfully launching an academic career in the challenging environment of higher education today is apt to require more explicit preparation than the informal socialization typically afforded in graduate school. As a faculty novice soon discovers, job success requires balancing multiple demands on one's time and energy. New Faculty offers a useful compendium of "survival" advice for the faculty newcomer on a variety of subjects: practical tips on classroom teaching, student performance evaluation, detailed advice on grant-writing, student advising, professional service, and publishing. Beginning faculty members - and possibly their more experienced colleagues as well - will find this lively guidebook both informative and thought-provoking.
The experience of an untenured faculty member is highly dependent on the quality of the mentoring they receive. This mentoring may come from a number of different sources, and the concept of developing a constellation of mentors is highly recommended, but a mentoring relationship that is guided by the mentee's needs will be the most productive. Often, however, the mentee does not know their own needs, what questions to ask, and what topics they should discuss with a mentor. This book provides a guide to the mentoring process for untenured faculty. Perspectives are provided and questions posed on topics ranging from establishing scholarly expertise and developing professional networks to personal health and balancing responsibilities. The questions posed are not intended for the mentee to answer in isolation, rather a junior faculty member should approach these questions throughout their untenured years with the help of their mentors. Survive and Thrive: A Guide for Untenured Faculty will help to facilitate the mentoring process and lead junior faculty to a path where they can move beyond just surviving and truly thrive in their position. Table of Contents: Tough Questions About Why You Are Here / Joining Your Department and Discipline / Establishing Expertise / Developing Networks, Relationships, and Mentoring Activities / Getting Support and Evaluating Your Personal Health / Planning for the Future / Conclusion
Since the first edition of A Guide to Faculty Development was published in 2002, the dynamic field of educational and faculty development has undergone many changes. Prepared under the auspices of the Professional and Organizational Development Network in Higher Education (POD), this thoroughly revised, updated, and expanded edition offers a fundamental resource for faculty developers, as well as for faculty and administrators interested in promoting and sustaining faculty development within their institutions. This essential book offers an introduction to the topic, includes twenty-three chapters by leading experts in the field, and provides the most relevant information on a range of faculty development topics including establishing and sustaining a faculty development program; the key issues of assessment, diversity, and technology; and faculty development across institutional types, career stages, and organizations. "This volume contains the gallant story of the emergence of a movement to sustain the vitality of college and university faculty in difficult times. This practical guide draws on the best minds shaping the field, the most productive experience, and elicits the imagination required to reenvision a dynamic future for learning societies in a global context." —R. Eugene Rice, senior scholar, Association of American Colleges and Universities "Across the country, people in higher education are thinking about how to prepare our graduates for a rapidly changing world while supporting our faculty colleagues who grew up in a very different world. Faculty members, academic administrators, and policymakers alike will learn a great deal from this volume about how to put together a successful faculty development program and create a supportive environment for learning in challenging times." —Judith A. Ramaley, president, Winona State University "This is the book on faculty development in higher education. Everyone involved in faculty development—including provosts, deans, department chairs, faculty, and teaching center staff—will learn from the extensive research and the practical wisdom in the Guide." —Peter Felten, president, The POD Network (2010–2011), and director, Center for the Advancement of Teaching and Learning, Elon University
Drawing from her extensive classroom and field experience, Jeane W. Anastas merges the "practice wisdom" of today's social work educators with contemporary theories on instruction and learning. Built around a teacher- and student-in-situation framework, Teaching in Social Work examines the effect of social issues, professional norms and needs, and various educational settings on the interactions among educators, students, and the subjects they learn. The result is a singular volume that focuses specifically on teaching within the field of social work, identifying the factors that result in effective educational outcomes. Anastas draws on the theories and selected research findings of higher education and social work education literature. She illuminates the critical aspects of teaching and learning as an adult, the best uses of different modalities of instruction, and the issues of diversity that influence all aspects of teaching and learning. Her book includes guest-authored chapters on field learning and the latest advances in teaching technology. It also engages with ethics, teaching and learning assessments, and faculty work in full-time social work education.

Best Books