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Traces the legacy of Krzysztof Kieslowski in films made after his death using his scripts or ideas and in the work of other filmmakers.
Since his death in 1996, Krzysztof Kieslowski has remained the best-known contemporary Polish filmmaker and one of the most popular and respected European directors, internationally renowned for his ambitious Decalogue and Three Colors trilogy. In this new addition to the Directors'Cuts series, Marek Haltof provides a comprehensive study of Kieslowski's cinema, discussing industrial practices in Poland and stressing that the director did not fit the traditional image of a "great" East-Central European auteur. He draws a fascinating portrait of the stridently independent director's work, noting that Kieslowski was not afraid to express unpopular views in film or in life. Haltof also shows how the director's work remains unique in the context of Polish documentary and narrative cinema.
Krzysztof Kieslowski’s untimely death came at the height of his career, after his Three Colors trilogy of films garnered international acclaim (and an Oscar nomination), and he had been proclaimed Europe’s most important filmmaker by many critics. Born in 1941, he was only fifty-four years old when he died. Kieslowski himself tried to tell the story of his life and career in the 1993 book Kieslowski on Kieslowski. This collection, by contrast, reveals the shifting voice of a filmmaker who was initially optimistic about his social and cultural role, then felt himself buffeted by the turbulent politics and events of the People’s Republic of Poland. As described in the chronology in this book, he found himself subject to the “economic censorship” of post-Communist filmmaking. How Kieslowski responded at each moment of his life, what he tried to achieve with each of his films, is finely detailed in thirty-five selections. These pieces bring together his thesis from the famous Lodz film school, a manifesto written just before the dark days of martial law in Poland, diary entries from the first time he was working outside Poland, and numerous rare interviews from Polish-, French-, and English-language sources.
Perhaps the greatest European director of the last 30 years, Krzsztof Kieslowski created a remarkable body of work in a relatively short period of time. His films are loved around the world for their dramatic power and consummate artistry. Kieslowski's cinematic style stands apart in several important respects: his mastery of abstract imagery, his innovative use of sound and his deliberate circumvention of standard cinematic codes. Unlike many other "art" directors - who often fail to rise above commentary on the medium itself - Kieslowski uses these stylistic liberties to explore his philosophical concerns: fate, God, suffering, and love. Through close analysis of films like The Decalogue, The Double Life of Veronique, Blue, White and Red, Joe Kickasola identifies the unique qualities, and artistic legacy, of this great director.
Director Krzysztof Kieslowski's Three Colors trilogy—Blue (1993), White (1993), and Red (1994)—is one of the great achievements of European film. A meditation on liberty, equality, and fraternity, these three films marked the culmination of the director's career, as well as the zenith of one of the most important creative collaborations in 20th-century cinema-between Kieslowski, scriptwriter Krzysztof Piesiewicz, and composer Zbigniew Preisner. Thanks to their close working relationship, music for the Three Colors trilogy achieves both a focal narrative and philosophical function. At times, Preisner's music advances the narrative independently of the films' other codes; at other times, it creates a metaphorical space into which the audience is invited in order to read for "deeper" messages. As the first major scholarly treatment of Preisner's music, Nicholas Reyland's Zbigniew Preisner's Three Colors Trilogy: A Film Score Guide fills an important void in film score scholarship. In this guide, Reyland analyzes the historical context of the film scores, the life of the composer, the hermeneutic and narrative role of the music within the film, and the musical scoring techniques used for the trilogy. This volume also draws on an interplay of established "classic" approaches to analyzing film music and more recent approaches in the exploration of its themes and readings. In addition, the composer's willingness to be interviewed by Reyland enhances the musicological scholarship of this book, giving the reader privileged access into the process of scoring. A significant contribution to both film studies and musicological literature, this book celebrates one of the great cinematic achievements of the last few decades.
New guide to the life and work of Krzysztof Kielowski, director of the 'Three Colours Trilogy' and a self-confessed pessimist who didn't like films, thought the camera was stupid' a felt he had no talent. Yet he wrote and directed some of the most moving and memorable films of the last twenty years. Covers every film in detail, as well as an essay introducing his life and work, and includes a multi-media reference for those who want to find out more about one of the acknowledged masters of cinema.'
This book traces the operation of duration in cinema, and argues that temporality should be a central concern of film scholarship. It explores the concepts of duration and rhythm, resonance and uncertainty, affect, sense and texture, to bring a fresh pers
The Red and the White: The Cinema of People's Poland takes a fascinating look at the history of post-war Polish cinema, and how it was affected by the political, social and cultural upheavals throughout the period 1947-89. This timely study re-evaluates the legacy of Socialist Realism, the representation of the war, cinematic portrayals of national myth and cultural history, literary adaptation and surrealism, and discourses of exile and national identity. Although paying particular reference to the work of Krzysztof Kieslowski and Andrzej Wajda, this book considers the contribution of a wide range of filmmakers, including Jerzy Skolimowski, Krzysztof Zanussi, Agnieska Holland, Andrzej Munk, Jerzy Kawalerowicz, Wojciech Has and Roman Polanski. The volume also includes unique primary archival research into the role of state-sponsored censorship, and coverage of Polish-Jewish representations in film. Among the many films discussed are A Generation, Eroica, Ashes and Diamonds, Family Life, The Promised Land, The Hour Glass Sanatorium, Hands Up!, Decalogue 8, Europa, Europa and The Double Life of Veronique.
The recent uproar over NSA dataveillance can obscure the fact that surveillance has been part of our lives for decades. And cinema has long been aware of its power—and potential for abuse. In Closed Circuits, Garrett Stewart analyzes a broad spectrum of films, from M and Rear Window through The Conversation to Déjà Vu, Source Code, and The Bourne Legacy, in which cinema has articulated—and performed—the drama of inspection’s unreturned look. While mainstays of the thriller, both the act and the technology of surveillance, Stewart argues, speak to something more foundational in the very work of cinema. The shared axis of montage and espionage—with editing designed to draw us in and make us forget the omnipresence of the narrative camera—extends to larger questions about the politics of an oversight regime that is increasingly remote and robotic. To such a global technopticon, one telltale response is a proliferating mode of digitally enhanced “surveillancinema.”
"I have, by the way, seen 943 of the 1001 movies, and am carefully rationing the remaining titles to prolong my life." - Roger Ebert "1001 ways to give cinema new scope." - The Herald Expert critics in each genre of film, from romance to horror and sci-fi, have once again painstakingly revised this list of essential must see-movies, cut and added films to bring the must-watch list bang up to date for 2013, from great classics like The Birth of a Nation and Gone With the Wind to recent Oscar winners like Life of Pi, Amour, Argo and the blockbusters that is Skyfall. Each entry tells you exactly why these films deserve inclusion in this definitive illustrated list, engaging readers in each film's concept development and production, including curious trivia facts about the movies, as well as the most famous pieces of memorabilia associated with them. Illustrated with hundreds of stunning film stills, portraits and poster art 1001 Movies You Must See Before You Dieoffers an incredible visual insight into the world of modern cinema. It puts together the most significant movies from all genres, from animation to Western, through action, comedy, documentary, musical, noir, romance, thriller, short and sci-fi. Movies from over 30 different countries have been included, offering a truly wide multi-cultural perspective, and the time span includes more than a century of extraordinary cinematography. Packed with vital statistics, and a few facts that might surprise you, this is a collector's must for the bookshelf as well as an entertaining read for all those who love the world of film. Whether your passion lies with The Blue Angel or Blue Velvet, from the films you shouldn't have missed the first time around, to the films you can see again and again, 1001 Movies You Must See Before You Die is the definitive guide for all movie lovers. Contents includes... Introduction 1900 1910 1920 1930 1940 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000
A unique and interdisciplinary collection in which scholars from Philosophy join those from Film Studies, English, and Comparative Literature to explore the nature and limits of love through in-depth reflection on particular works of literature and film.
This guide is a collection of engaging and provocative capsule reviews of films across the spectrum of cinema history, from Russian silent movies to American comedies, classic documentaries to Japanese anime, and beyond.
New paperback edition of this lucid analysis of one of cinema's most subtle, mysterious and metaphysical exponents of film. An indispensable guide to the career and life of one of the greatest filmmakers in history, this will be essential reading for film students and anyone with an interest in Kieslowski's work. Illustrated throughout with b & w photographs. 'If you are interested in this remarkable filmmaker, there could be no better book on the subject than this one' - Peter Bogdanovich
The French Revolution was the scene of much intellectual and social upheaval. Its impact touched a wide range of subjects: the relationship of the church to the state, social relationships, science, literature, fashion, philosophy and theology. Although the French Revolution's momentum was felt across Europe and North America, it met a particularly interesting response in the Netherlands, at that time the scene of a burgeoning neo-Calvinist movement. In that context, the likes of Groen van Prinsterer, Abraham Kuyper and Herman Bavinck responded to the French Revolution's ideals and influence in a variety of intellectual and practical ways.This book approaches that Dutch response from a range of historical and theological perspectives, and in so doing explores the relationship between the French Revolution and the development of neo-Calvinism. Beginning with historical portraits of Bavinck and Kuyper in relation to the Revolution, the perspectives offered also include, amongst others, the place of multilingualism in neo-Calvinism and the Revolution, neo-Calvinist and Revolutionary approaches to fashion, a dialogue between Kuyperian theology and Kieslowski's Three Colours trilogy, and a contemporary neo-Calvinist critique of French laïcité. This book forms part of a wider Project neo-Calvinism supported by the Theologische Universiteit Kampen and the VU University Amsterdam.

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