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The author has created a method for delivering energy from the heart of the parent directly into the heart of the child. The key to this is sincerity; the heart is not fooled by mechanical techniques or artificiality, but it immediately responds to truth. You're working with the energy of love.
If young children are to flourish and become happy, confident and motivated learners, they need to develop in an environment that gives them the opportunities and freedom to play and learn, along with the support of parents and practitioners who are flourishing themselves. This invaluable text looks at the conditions that enable all those engaged in the early years sector to flourish, covering themes such as the outdoor environment, the curriculum, parent partnership, equality and ethical practice. Divided into three sections, each part covers: Concepts: A consideration of how flourishing is framed by political, historical and policy frameworks. Practices: Exploring the issues that early years practitioners are faced with when engaging with parents and multi-agent professionals within their setting. Futures: Examining some of the long-term issues that may need to be revisited on a regular basis to enable continual and flourishing development to occur. With key points and reflective tasks, this book will be valuable reading to all students and practitioners working in the early childhood education and care sector who want to ensure that the children in their care are given the best possible start in life.
The family is hotly contested ideological terrain. Some defend the traditional two-parent heterosexual family while others welcome its demise. Opinions vary about how much control parents should have over their children's upbringing. Family Values provides a major new theoretical account of the morality and politics of the family, telling us why the family is valuable, who has the right to parent, and what rights parents should—and should not—have over their children. Harry Brighouse and Adam Swift argue that parent-child relationships produce the "familial relationship goods" that people need to flourish. Children's healthy development depends on intimate relationships with authoritative adults, while the distinctive joys and challenges of parenting are part of a fulfilling life for adults. Yet the relationships that make these goods possible have little to do with biology, and do not require the extensive rights that parents currently enjoy. Challenging some of our most commonly held beliefs about the family, Brighouse and Swift explain why a child's interest in autonomy severely limits parents' right to shape their children's values, and why parents have no fundamental right to confer wealth or advantage on their children. Family Values reaffirms the vital importance of the family as a social institution while challenging its role in the reproduction of social inequality and carefully balancing the interests of parents and children.
International uproar followed the recent announcement of the birth of twin girls whose genomes had been edited with a breakthrough DNA editing-technology. This technology, called clustered regularly interspaced short palindrome repeats or CRISPR-Cas9, can alter any DNA, including DNA in embryos, meaning that changes can be passed to the offspring of the person that embryo becomes. Should we use gene editing technologies to change ourselves, our children, and future generations to come? The potential uses of CRISPR-Cas9 and other gene editing technologies are unprecedented in human history. By using these technologies, we eradicate certain dreadful diseases. Altering human DNA, however, raises enormously difficult questions. Some of these questions are about safety: Can these technologies be deployed without posing an unreasonable risk of physical harm to current and future generations? Can all physical risks be adequately assessed, and responsibly managed? But gene editing technologies also raise other moral questions, which touch on deeply held, personal, cultural, and societal values: Might such technologies redefine what it means to be healthy, or normal, or cherished? Might they undermine relationships between parents and children, or exacerbate the gap between the haves and have-nots? The broadest form of this second kind of question is the focus of this book: What might gene editing--and related technologies--mean for human flourishing? In the new essays collected here, an interdisciplinary group of scholars asks age--old questions about the nature and well-being of humans in the context of a revolutionary new biotechnology--one that has the potential to change the genetic make-up of both existing people and future generations. Welcoming readers who study related issues and those not yet familiar with the formal study of bioethics, the authors of these essays open up a conversation about the ethics of gene editing. It is through this conversation that citizens can influence laws and the distribution of funding for science and medicine, that professional leaders can shape understanding and use of gene editing and related technologies by scientists, patients, and practitioners, and that individuals can make decisions about their own lives and the lives of their families.
Can humans flourish without destroying the earth? In this book, experts on many of the world's major and minor religious traditions address the question of human and earth flourishing. Each chapter considers specific religious ideas and specific environmental harms. Chapters are paired and the authors work in dialogue with one another. Taken together, the chapters reveal that the question of flourishing is deceptively simple. Most would agree that humans should flourish without destroying the earth. But not all humans have equal opportunities to flourish. Additionally, on a basic physical level any human flourishing must, of necessity, cause some harm. These considerations of the price and distribution of flourishing raise unique questions about the status of humans and nature. This book represents a step toward reconciliation: that people and their ecosystems may live in peace, that people from different religious worldviews may engage in productive dialogue; in short, that all may flourish.
What do babies and young children really need? For the first time, two famed advocates for children cut through all the theories, platitudes, and controversies that surround parenting advice to define what every child must have in the first years of life. They lay out the seven irreducible needs of any child, in any society, and confront such thorny questions as: How much time do children need one-on-one with a parent? What is the effect of shifting caregivers, of custody arrangements? Why are we knowingly letting children fail in school? Nothing is off limits. This short, hard-hitting book, the fruit of decades of experience and caring, sounds a wake-up call for parents, teachers, judges, social workers, policy makers-anyone who cares about the welfare of children.A Merloyd Lawrence Book
Packed with practical strategies and inspiring research about how learning changes the brain this book will empower you with ideas you can apply right away that can positively change children’s lives forever.
The purpose of this book is to combine perspectives of scholars from Africa on Child Theology from a variety of theological sub-disciplines to provide some theological and ministerial perspectives on this topic. The book disseminates original research and new developments in this study field, especially as relevant to the African context. In the process it addresses also the global need to hear voices from Africa in this academic field. It aims to convey the importance of considering Africa’s children in theologising. The different chapters represent diverse methodologies, but the central and common focus is to approach the subject from the viewpoint of Africa’s children. The individual authors’ varied theological sub-disciplinary dispositions contribute to the unique and distinct character of the book. Almost all chapters are theoretical orientated with less empirical but more qualitative research, although some of the chapters refer to empirical research that the authors have performed in the past. Most of the academic literature in the field of Child Theologies is from American or British-European origin. The African context is fairly absent in this discourse, although it is the youngest continent and presents unique and relevant challenges. This book was written by theological scholars from Africa, focussing on Africa’s children. It addresses not only theoretical challenges in this field but also provides theological perspectives for ministry with children and for important social change. Written from a variety of theological sub-disciplines, the book is aimed at scholars across theological sub-disciplines, especially those theological scholars interested in the intersections between theology, childhood studies and African cultural or social themes. It addresses themes and provides insights that are also relevant for specialist leaders and professionals in this field. No part of the book was plagiarised from another publication or published elsewhere.
'Life is not worth living unless one can be indiscreet to intimate friends,' wrote Isaiah Berlin to a correspondent. Flourishing inaugurates a keenly awaited edition of Berlin's letters that might well adopt this remark as an epigraph. Berlin's life was enormously worth living, both for himself and for us; and fortunately he said a great deal to his friends on paper as well as in person. The indiscretions- only part of the story, of course- are not those of Everyman. Berlin is one of the towering intellectual figures of the twentieth century, the most famous English thinker of the post- war era, and the focus of growing interest and discussion. Above all, he is one of the best modern exponents of the disappearing art of letter- writing. When this volume opens Berlin is eighteen, a pupil at St Paul's School, London. He becomes an undergraduate at Oxford, then a Fellow of All Souls, where he writes his famous biography of Karl Marx. He then moves to New College to teach philosophy, and after the outbreak of the World War 2 sails to America in somewhat mysterious circumstances with Guy Burgess. He stays in the USA, working for the British Government, until July 1946, when he returns to Oxford. Berlin's letters are marvellously accessible, and as entertaining as a novel. During the two decades covered here we see his personality and career growing and blooming. In America he writes a regular telegram to his anxious parents, often saying just 'Flourishing'; the word is entirely apt, not only for his wartime experience, but for the whole of his early life, vividly displayed in this book in all its multi-faceted delightfulness.
Written by one of the most dynamic author teams in the field of Reading and Literacy, the second edition ofAll Children Readcontinues to offer K-8 teachers the best practices for nurturing emergent literacy, teaching early literacy concepts, and developing reading and writing inallstudents — those of varying reading levels and abilities, as well as those who are English language learners. The new edition increases its emphasis on the professional aspects of literacy instruction, and also includes significant new coverage of fluency and vocabulary, differentiated instruction (and connections to the SIOP), and the all-important topics of literacy assessment. Central to the text are the six overriding themes--the troubled reader, family/community literacy, technology, writing and reading connections, language diversity, and phonics/phonetic awareness---interwoven throughout, making this book the most contemporary and critical learning aid to come out in the field in years.
What makes children happy, confident and successful? How can you help a child to flourish? Their environment is important, but the real difference is in your hands – every adult has the tools to help a child achieve psychological wellbeing. This book provides a practical model for helping children flourish and achieve their personal potential in every area of their lives. Drawing on ideas from positive psychology and child development theory, the model explores the five key areas of wellbeing: personal strengths, emotional wellbeing, positive communication, learning strengths, and resilience. Practical activities are included for each area, and a questionnaire provides an assessment to enable you to keep track of progress. Suitable for use with children aged 3–11, this step-by-step guide is an ideal resource for professionals working with children, including counsellors, social workers, teachers, and psychotherapists, as well as parents.
This anthology explores a variety of positions on recent, controversial, social problems—all of which involve government policy. The wide-range of contemporary issues includes allowing/encouraging immigration, use of school vouchers, government control over drugs and guns, same-sex marriages, government support of the arts, affirmative action, the death penalty, and the legitimacy of legally restricting the sale of pornography. For anyone seeking to clarify their understanding and thinking about rights and wrongs in public affairs.

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