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Beauty tames beastly bachelor? Good luck! All men were not created equal, and Phoebe Lane had quickly deduced that her sexy new neighbor, Wyatt Madison, had been created with one bad attitude. True, he was heartbreakingly handsome and distractingly distinguished, but Wyatt had the nerve to think Phoebe was husband hunting and that he was her prey. The beautiful and brainy gal was interested only in hooking Wyatt up with her best friend. Yet the thought of taming this older man and letting him go was becoming an increasingly uncomfortable proposition. Suddenly this confirmed bachelorette wanted the beast all to herself…and a wedding to boot! 2001 Ways to Wed: This little book on finding Mr. Right is guaranteed to help three friends make it to the altar!
Staging Philanthropy is a history of women's philanthropic associations during Germany's "long" nineteenth century. Challenged by the French Revolution and the Napoleonic occupation and war, dynastic groups in Germany made community welfare and its defense part of newly-gendered social obligations, sponsoring a network of state women's associations, philanthropic institutions, and nursing orders which were eventually coordinated by the German Red Cross. These patriotic groups helped fashion an official nationalism that defended conservative power and authority in the new nation-state. An original and truly multi-disciplinary work, Staging Philanthropy uses archival research to reconstruct the neglected history of women's philanthropic organizations during the 'long' nineteenth century. Borrowing from cultural anthropologists, Jean Quataert explores how meaning is created in the theater of politics. Linking gender with nationalism and war with humanitarianism, Quataert weaves her analysis together with themes of German historiography and the wider context of European history. Staging Philanthropy will interest readers in German history, women's history, politics and anthropology, as well as those whose interest is in medicalization and the German Red Cross. This book situates itself in the middle of a string of debates pertaining to modern German history and, thus, should also appeal to readers from the general educated public. Jean Quataert is Professor of History and Women's Studies, Binghamton University. She has previously published a number of books, including Connecting Spheres: European Women in a Globalizing World, 1500 to the Present with Marilyn J. Boxer (Oxford, 1999).
Should we ever again trust Germany to behave itself? Germany on the March attempts to answer this question, treating familiar material in a unique, refreshing manner. The author explores the actual people, events, and ideas behind this stream of disturbing images and distrust associated with Germany. Kolkey provides special reference to the central role of domestic politics, relating it to the decision making process involved in the outbreak of all modern German wars. Germany on the March will be of interest to students of modern German History.
An intriguing story woven around a regular guy who starts life hitchhiking with his buddy and moves to Southern California and enters into the construction business. He is then elected to the California state senate. He soon has a devastating affair and is arrested for murder. Story moves to Carson City, Nevada. Richard is overtaken by revenge and takes on a dramatic plan to tunnel into the bottom of Lake Tahoe.
He and Him is an autobiography dealing with both psychology and archaeology in the author's life. He was born during the Great Depression. His parents were an Ohio .farmerette and a man from the Tennessee mountains who had become an alcoholic on moonshine whiskey. It was a dysfunctional family from the start. The mom soon developed very serious emotional problems apparently because she wasn't satisfied with the man whom she had married. When the author was a six-year-old boy she told him that she planned to take him and leave his dad. However, she did the exact opposite and had more kids. Upon adding more offspring to the household; the author, then seven years old, became the victim of terrible physical and emotional abuse, as well as complete neglect. From the age of seven the author had to essentially raise himself. He tried to avoid his parents as much as possible by spending his days in the fields and meadows by himself collecting butterflies, pretty rocks, and looking for prehistoric Indian arrowheads. After finding a few Indian arrowheads on farms in Ohio he started a collection of Indian arrowheads and other artifacts at a very young age. His collection eventually turned into a very renowned private museum as he got a little older. When the author was almost thirteen years old his parents quit farming and started operating their own country store in a different community. Chapter 3 in this book describes life in country stores in Ohio during the 1940s and 1950s. The author lived in such a country store environment until he turned eighteen and went away to college. He was the first of any of his relatives to ever go away to college. His mother furnished him money to attend college, but he did it completely on his own with absolutely no family encouragement or support to get a degree. From "the time that the author started getting educated his mom refused to ever call him by his given name. She only referred to him as either "He or Him." Others in the family soon became full of covetousness towards him because they perceived that he had advantages which they didn't have. Competitive jealousy of others in the household mounted, their believinq that they had to try to outdo the educated member of the family. A long, drawn-out, bitter family war against the author ensued. Disrespect for the author's higher education continued in later years by not only the third generation, but also by in-laws who didn't even know the author when he was in college! After receiving both a BS degree and an MA degree in geology, with a master's thesis dealing with archaeology of Archaic Indian sites near his hometown, the author took a temporary summer job as a national park ranger at Canyon de Chelly National Monument at Chinle, Arizona. Canyon de Chelly is located in the center of the vast Navajo Indian Reservation. Getting to live and work in such a beautiful natural area was like a dream come true. That first summers work at Canyon de Chelly motivated the author to eventually work as a seasonal park ranger in six other national parks and monuments. After working at Canyon de Chelly for one summer , the author ended up going back to Arizona where he lived for ten more years. He married a woman in Kansas who he hardly even knew, then he went to the University of Arizona where he spent two years working towards a PhD degree. After that, he and his wife spent eight more years back on the Navajo Indian Reservation. During those years on the reservation he taught Navajo Indian children on a substitute teaching certificate. It was a full-time job in the winter. Almost all of his students were Navajo Indians. He taught all grade levels from kindergarten through high school. Chapters 6, 7, and 8 of this book are devoted to stories about life in remote areas of the reservation in the 1960s and 1970s. At that time the author's doctor and grocery stores were 145 miles from where he lived. There we
A completely fresh look at the culture clash between Britain and Germany that all but destroyed Europe. Half a century before 1914, most Britons saw the Germans as poor and rather comical cousins - and most Germans looked up to the British as their natural mentors. Over the next five decades, each came to think that the other simply had to be confronted - in Europe, in Africa, in the Pacific and at last in the deadly race to cover the North Sea with dreadnoughts. But why? Why did so many Britons come to see in Germany everything that was fearful and abhorrent? Why did so many Germans come to see any German who called dobbel fohlt while playing Das Lawn Tennis as the dupe of a global conspiracy? Packed with long-forgotten stories such as the murder of Queen Victoria's cook in Bohn, the disaster to Germany's ironclads under the White Cliffs, bizarre early colonial clashes and the precise, dark moment when Anglophobia begat modern anti-Semitism, this is the fifty-year saga of the tragic, and often tragicomic, delusions and miscalculations that led to the defining cataclysm of our times - the breaking of empires and the womb of horrors, the Great War. Richly illustrated with the words and pictures that formed our ancestors' disastrous opinions, it will forever change the telling of this fateful tale.
Book 2 of The Survivalist Series No electricity. No running water. No food. No end in sight. If life as you knew it changed in an instant, would you be prepared? In A. American’s first novel, Going Home, readers were introduced to Morgan Carter, the resourceful, tough-as-nails survivalist who embarks on a treacherous 250-mile journey across Florida following the collapse of the nation’s power grid. Now reunited with his loving wife and daughters in this follow-up to Going Home, Morgan knows that their happiness is fleeting, as the worst is yet to come. Though for years Morgan has been diligently preparing for emergency situations, many of his neighbors are completely unready for life in this strange new world—and they’re starting to get restless. With the help of his closest companions, Morgan fights to keeps his home secure—only to discover shocking information about the state of the nation in the process. Fans of James Wesley Rawles, William R. Forstchen's One Second After, and The End by G. Michael Hopf will revel in A. American's apocalyptic tale.

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