Download Free Anthropology Of Environmental Education Education In A Competitve And Globalizing World Book in PDF and EPUB Free Download. You can read online Anthropology Of Environmental Education Education In A Competitve And Globalizing World and write the review.

This book aims to substantiate the growing body of research of socio-cultural contexts in which environmental education, formal or informal, take place. Innovation in environmental education that takes local contexts into account is necessary, in terms of both recognising global and historical forces that lead to environmental degradation and social and technological changes that could potentially provide solutions to environmental problems. Today, we face some of the greatest environmental challenges in global history, including climate change, deforestation, desertification and the rapid extinction of species of plants and animals. As with many social concerns and issues, the education system is widely seen as the appropriate vehicle for wide scale social reform. Environmental education is becoming increasingly important due to a number of changes in society.
This volume delivers a cutting-edge analysis on vernacular globalization, or how local forces mediate global trends. It delves into the vital facets of the quest for global competitiveness, including: Global university rankings World-class universities University mergers Quality assurance Cross-border higher education International education hubs. The authors situate their topics within current international scholarship and demonstrate the myriad avenues through which local actors in higher education may respond to global competition. They pose critical questions about the impact of global competition in an increasingly hierarchical higher education environment, interrogating the potential for social injustice that arises. By providing an alternative perspective to the descriptive, normative approach that dominates the scholarship on global competition in higher education, the chapters in this volume open a fresh and invaluable dialogue in this arena. This is the 168th volume of the Jossey-Bass quarterly report series New Directions for Higher Education. Addressed to presidents, vice presidents, deans, and other higher education decision makers on all kinds of campuses, it provides timely information and authoritative advice about major issues and administrative problems confronting every institution.
Reviews theories of competition and existing literature, and examines the attributes of market competition and strategies adhered to by firms in the global marketplace. Provides an in-depth analysis of a broad spectrum of important topics on competitive strategies and tactics.
This volume presents new theoretical approaches, methodologies, subject pools, and topics in the field of environmental anthropology. Environmental anthropologists are increasingly focusing on self-reflection - not just on themselves and their impacts on environmental research, but also on the reflexive qualities of their subjects, and the extent to which these individuals are questioning their own environmental behavior. Here, contributors confront the very notion of "natural resources" in granting non-human species their subjectivity and arguing for deeper understanding of "nature," and "wilderness" beyond the label of "ecosystem services." By engaging in interdisciplinary efforts, these anthropologists present new ways for their colleagues, subjects, peers and communities to understand the causes of, and alternatives to environmental destruction. This book demonstrates that environmental anthropology has moved beyond the construction of rural, small group theory, entering into a mode of solution-based methodologies and interdisciplinary theories for understanding human-environmental interactions. It is focused on post-rural existence, health and environmental risk assessment, on the realm of alternative actions, and emphasizes the necessary steps towards preventing environmental crisis.
Developing the Global Student addresses the question of how students of higher education can emerge from their university life better equipped to dwell more effectively, ethically, and comfortably amidst the turmoils of a globalizing world. It does this from a number of theoretical perspectives, illustrating the nature of the personal and educational challenges facing the individual student and the teaching professional. The book explores the massive social changes wrought by the technologies and mobilities of globalization, particularly how present and future generations will relate to, work with and dwell alongside the global other. It outlines a range of social, psychological and intercultural perspectives on human tendencies to seek out comfort among communities of similitude, and illustrates how the experience of life in a global era requires us to transcend the limits of our own biographies and approach university education as a matter of knowledge deconstruction and identity reconstruction, rather than reproduction. This book brings these considerations directly into the daily business of higher education by drawing out the implications for practice at a number of levels. It examines: the implications of a globally interconnected world and individual biographies for the design of the curriculum; a holistic view of learning in the context of the need to develop the global self; what the impact on non-academic practice will be if universities as institutions are to enable these changes; ways in which the broader student community can transform to offer an experience which is more supportive of the development of global selves. Linking theoretical perspectives to present a model of learning as change, this book will be of great interest to those working in higher education, and particularly to anyone involved in policy design and the delivery of the student experience.
Tools for Teaching in an Educationally Mobile World examines the challenges that undergraduate and postgraduate teachers often encounter when working with students from different national and cultural backgrounds. It focuses on the consequences for interactive teaching and for course design in a world where students, ideas and courses are mobile, using examples and experiences from a wide range of disciplines and national contexts. It not only considers Anglophone countries, including the USA, Canada, the UK, Australia and New Zealand, but also the use of English as a language of instruction in countries where neither teachers nor students are native English speakers. This book offers ideas for adjusting and adapting teaching approaches for culturally and linguistically diverse student groups. Students may cross national boundaries to seek accreditation, or the courses may be ‘transnational’, being designed in one country and delivered in another using local as well as ‘fly-in’ faculty. It draws upon growing good practice recommendations using tried and tested methods alongside the extensive and varied experience of the author. The book is structured around a selection of the most common issues and statements of belief held by educators, with key topics including: the impact of educational mobility on teaching and learning; teachers as mediators between academic cultural differences; learning and teaching in English; inclusive teaching and learning; encouraging student participation; assessing diverse students. With a wealth of practical tips and tools that help deal with these issues, this book will be of value to any educator working with students from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds. It will also interest those involved in the design of curriculum and pedagogy.
Advanced undergraduate and postgraduate students and researchers in international business, international management and cross-cultural management, and all concerned with the transfer of knowledge in the global economy. It will also be a valuable source of concepts and ideas to cross-cultural trainers and to various categories of practitioners within knowledge management and international human resource management. This book forges a break with the concept of culture that has dominated management thinking, education, and research for several decades. Culture, rather than being presented as a source of difference and antagonism, is presented as a form of organisational knowledge that can be converted into a resource for underpinning core competence. This perspective based on extensive research into the operations of four major international corporations, challenges traditional thinking by contending that cross-cultural management is a form of knowledge management. Key to this text are the four global case companies contrasting experiences, presented as insightful case studies about rarely observed aspects of firms cross-cultural communication behaviour.

Best Books