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Character assassination in presidential politics is as American as apple pie. Anything for a Vote is a candid look at 200+ years of dirty tricks and bad behaviour in presidential elections, from John Adams to the present day.These bizarre-but-true anecdotes from American history are whimsically illustrated, showing the presidents at their (alleged) worst.
The Crusades, Custer's Last Stand, the Charge of the Light Brigade, D-Day — we've all heard of these momentous events, but how much do we really know about them? The ultimate popular history book, History's Greatest Hits brings together, in one elegantly designed volume, the forty most famous events from our past. Author Joseph Cummins recounts each episode with a storyteller's flair. In doing so, he offers fascinating insights into the minds of the protagonists, including many of the greatest names in history, from Hannibal to Churchill and Columbus to Kennedy, as well as new perspectives on conventional history. He reveals just what made these incidents so significant and why they have gained a permanent place in our collective consciousness. Short, easily digestible chapters make this an ideal way to catch up on the history we've heard of and ought to know more about. Illustrations and period photography enhance each story. History's Greatest Hits is the perfect gift for amateur history buffs, students and anyone else seeking to understand the world we live in today.
First published in 1987. This volume traces the arguments of early suffragists through the last three decades of the nineteenth century. Includes the texts of the House of Commons Debate on the 1871 Disabilities Bill, 1982 Women's Franchise Bill and key documents by those who were opposed to women's suffrage
Tricksters are known by their deeds. Obviously not all the examples in American Tricksters are full-blown mythological tricksters like Coyote, Raven, or the Two Brothers found in Native American stories, or superhuman figures like the larger-than-life Davy Crockett of nineteenth-century tales. Newer expressions of trickiness do share some qualities with the Trickster archetype seen in myths. Rock stars who break taboos and get away with it, heroes who overcome monstrous circumstances, crafty folk who find a way to survive and thrive when the odds are against them, men making spectacles of themselves by feeding their astounding appetites in public--all have some trickster qualities. Each person, every living creature who ever faced an obstacle and needed to get around it, has found the built-in trickster impulse. Impasses turn the trickster gene on, or stimulate the trick-performing imagination--that's life. To explore the ways and means of trickster maneuvers can alert us to pitfalls, help us appreciate tricks that are entertaining, and aid us in fending off ploys which drain our resources and ruin our lives. Knowing more about the Trickster archetype in our psyches helps us be more self-aware.
Before 1893 no woman anywhere in the world had the vote in a national election. A hundred years later almost all countries had enfranchised women, and it was a sign of backwardness not to have done so. This is the story of how this momentous change came about. The first genuinely global history of women and the vote, it takes the story of women in politics from the earliest times to the present day, revealing startling new connections across time and national boundaries - from Europe and North America to Asia, Africa, Latin America, and the Muslim world post-9/11. A story of individuals as well as of wider movements, it includes the often dramatic life-stories of women's suffrage pioneers from across the world, painting vivid biographical portraits of everyone from Susan B. Anthony and the Pankhursts to hitherto lesser-known activists in China, Latin America, and Africa. It is also the first major post-feminist history of women's struggle for the vote. Controversially, Jad Adams rejects the widely accepted idea that success was primarily a result of the pressure group politics of the suffragists and their supporters. Ultimately, he argues, it was nationalism, not feminism, that was the most important factor in winning women the vote.

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