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Arabic Grammar in Context offers a unique and exciting approach to learning grammar. It presents grammar as a necessary and essential tool for understanding Arabic and for developing comprehension and production skills. Features include: authentic texts from a rich variety of sources, literary and non-literary, used as the starting point for the illustration and explanation of key areas of Arabic grammar clear and authoritative demonstration of the relevance of grammar for understanding and interpreting Arabic a wide range of appropriate exercises designed to consolidate learning fully vocalized exercises and texts a glossary of vocabulary and expressions provided at the end of the book audio readings of the texts available online for additional listening practice. Suitable for class use and independent study, Arabic Grammar in Context is ideal for intermediate to advanced learners of Arabic.
Fundamentals of Arabic Grammar provides an authoritative guide to Modern Standard Arabic (MSA) grammar. It has been organised to promote a thorough understanding of MSA grammar and presents its complexities in a cohesive and user-friendly format, filling many gaps left by other textbooks. Explanations are clear, full and accessible and extensive cross-referencing, two generous indices and six appendices provide users with easy access to the information they require. No prior knowledge of linguistic terminology is required. Features include: Expert treatment of a full range of grammar topics and structures, including the case system, Idhaafa, the equational sentence, quantifiers and the vocative, generously spread across thirty eight chapters Special attention to parts of speech, such as nouns, pronouns, adjectives, adverbs and propositions, given at the beginning of the book to acquaint students with the basic units of Arabic and provide a solid foundation for further learning A wide range of contemporary examples drawn from real life to provide solid context to grammar points, further supported by word glosses and idiomatic translations of sentences Grammatical terms given in both Arabic and English A wide variety of supplementary learning resources such as practice sheets, exercises and verb tables available for free download at http://www.routledge.com/books/details/9780415710046/ Substantial bibliography incorporating primary Arabic grammar sources in addition to secondary sources in Arabic and in English Fundamentals of Arabic Grammar has been field tested over a number of years and has been written by a highly experienced teacher of Arabic. It will be an essential resource for students and teachers of Arabic at all university levels and is suitable for use both as a companion reference text in Arabic language courses and as a standalone text in independent grammar classes.
Al-'Arabiyya is the annual journal of the American Association of Teachers of Arabic and serves scholars in the United States and abroad. Al-'Arabiyya includes scholarly articles and reviews that advance the study, research, and teaching of Arabic language, linguistics, literature, and pedagogy.
Abdallah Nacereddine first taught Arabic in the United States before moving to Switzerland, where he led Arabic language courses at the League of Arab States and in conjunction with the Arab-Swiss Chamber of Commerce. He directed his own Institute for Arabic Language Teaching in Geneva, Lausanne, Bern, and Zurich, and taught Arabic at the United Nations in Geneva for over twenty-two years. At present, he is teaching at the International Labour Office. His teaching materials are the result of this experience and have been thoroughly tested in class. One of the first Arabic grammar books was published in the 13th century, under the title al-Alfia (didactic treatise in one thousand lines) by Ibn Malek (600-673 A. H. / 1203-1274 A. D) Since that time, Arabic grammar has not changed at all. In 1636, Thomas Erpenius published his definitive work, Grammatica Arabica, in Latin at Leiden. He followed a methodology which suited the European mind and adopted a specific terminology, which had to be applied by every non Arabic-speaking grammarian. Following this, several Arabic grammar books were published in different languages. Contrary to the grammar of other languages which have continued to evolve, Arabic grammar has remained unchanged. There are already a certain number of Arabic grammar books. What then is the point of publishing yet another? From his childhood, the author studied Arabic grammar, mainly from the al-Alfia treatise. He started to teach it in exactly the same archaic manner that he had learnt it. It was when he began to teach Arabic at the United Nations in Geneva to non-Arabic speakers in a multicultural context that he had to learn a new teaching method and its terminology. He therefore started to follow the European methodology for teaching Arabic grammar and to use its terminology.
Despite the status of Arabic as a global language and the high demand to learn it, the field of Arabic second language acquisition remains underinvestigated. Second language acquisition findings are crucial for informing and advancing the field of Arabic foreign language pedagogy including Arabic language teaching, testing, and syllabus design. Arabic Second Language Learning and Effects of Input, Transfer, and Typology provides data-driven empirical findings for a number of basic and high-frequency morphosyntactic structures with two novel typological language pairings, examining Arabic second language acquisition data from adult L1 Chinese- and Russian-speaking learners of Arabic as a foreign language. Alhawary’s study examines the different processes, hypotheses, and acquisition tendencies from the two learner groups, and documents the extent of the successes and challenges faced by such learners in their L2 Arabic grammatical development during the first three years of learning the language. In addition, the book offers both theoretical and practical implications related to input exposure, L1 and L2 transfer, and typological and structural proximity effects. This book serves as a valuable resource for both second language acquisition experts and foreign language teaching practitioners.
This volume offers in-depth introductions into major aspects of the Foundations of Arabic Linguistics, early Syriac and medieval Hebrew linguistic traditions. It presents S?bawayhi in the context of his grammatical legacy and reviews his work in the light of modern theories.
This book is a comprehensive study of SAbawayhi's methodological concepts and methods. It analyzes a wide range of the KitAba (TM)s passages, demonstrates the coherency of its authora (TM)s system of grammatical analysis, and highlights its huge influence on the grammatical tradition.
The Arabic grammatical tradition is one of the great traditions in the history of linguistics, yet it is also one that is comparatively unknown to modern western linguistics. The purpose of the present book is to provide an introduction to this grammatical tradition not merely by summarizing it, but by putting it into a perspective that will make it accessible to any linguist trained in the western tradition. The reader should not by put off by the word 'medieval': Arabic grammatical theory shares a number of fundamental similarities with modern linguistic theory. Indeed, one might argue that one reason Arabic theory has gone unappreciated for so long is that nothing like it existed in the West at the time of its 'discovery' by Europeans in the 19th century, when the European orientalist tradition was formed, and that it it only with the development of a Saussurean and Bloomfieldian structural tradition that a better perspective has become possible.
A Reference Grammar of Modern Standard Arabic is a comprehensive handbook on the structure of Arabic. Keeping technical terminology to a minimum, it provides a detailed yet accessible overview of Modern Standard Arabic in which the essential aspects of its phonology, morphology and syntax can be readily looked up and understood. Accompanied by extensive carefully-chosen examples, it will prove invaluable as a practical guide for supporting students' textbooks, classroom work or self-study, and will also be a useful resource for scholars and professionals wishing to develop an understanding of the key features of the language. Grammar notes are numbered for ease of reference, and a section is included on how to use an Arabic dictionary, as well as helpful glossaries of Arabic and English linguistic terms and a useful bibliography. Clearly structured and systematically organised, this book is set to become the standard guide to the grammar of contemporary Arabic.
Modern Written Arabic is a complete reference guide to the grammar of modern written Arabic. The Grammar presents an accessible and systematic description of the language, focusing on real patterns of use in contemporary written Arabic, from street signs to literature. Examples are drawn from authentic texts, both literary and journalistic, published since 1990. This comprehensive work is an invaluable resource for intermediate and advanced students of Arabic and anyone interested in Arabic linguistics and the way modern written Arabic works. Features include: comprehensive coverage of all parts of speech full cross-referencing authentic examples, given in Arabic script, transliteration and translation a detailed index.
The study focuses on a famous work by a mediaeval Arab grammarian who was once called the 'second Sibawayhi' (the pioneer of Arabic grammatical studies).
This book sets out to deal with the concept of taʿlīl by investigating the major works of those grammarians who have contributed most in theoretical terms to its development and elaboration in the Arabic Grammatical Tradition.
This book explores speakers’ intentions, and the structural and pragmatic resources they employ, in spoken Arabic – which is different in many essential respects from literary Arabic. Based on new empirical findings from across the Arabic world this book elucidates the many ways in which context and the goals and intentions of the speaker inform and constrain linguistic structure in spoken Arabic. This is the first book to provide an in-depth analysis of information structure in spoken Arabic, which is based on language as it is actually used, not on normatively-given grammar. Written by leading experts in Arabic linguistics, the studies evaluate the ways in which relevant parts of a message in spoken Arabic are encoded, highlighted or obscured. It covers a broad range of issues from across the Arabic-speaking world, including the discourse-sensitive properties of word order variation, the use of intonation for information focussing, the differential role of native Arabic and second languages to encode information in a codeswitching context, and the need for cultural contextualization to understand the role of "disinformation" structure. The studies combine a strong empirical basis with methodological and theoretical issues drawn from a number of different perspectives including pragmatic theory, language contact, instrumental prosodic analysis and (de-)grammaticalization theory. The introductory chapter embeds the project within the deeper Arabic grammatical tradition, as elaborated by the eleventh century grammarian Abdul Qahir al-Jurjani. This book provides an invaluable comprehensive introduction to an important, yet understudied, component of spoken Arabic.
This volume presents papers given at the second Symposium on the History of Arabic Grammar (Nijmegen, 1987). The subject has many aspects and invites many different approaches, which might roughly be categorized into three main groupings, viz. treatments of individual grammarians, examinations of particular grammatical topics, and analysis of medieval concepts from the perspective of contemporary linguistics.
Arabic, one of the official languages of the United Nations, is spoken by more than half a billion people around the world and is of increasing importance in today’s political and economic spheres. The study of the Arabic language has a long and rich history: earliest grammatical accounts date from the 8th century and include full syntactic, morphological, and phonological analyses of the vernaculars and of Classical Arabic. In recent years the academic study of Arabic has become increasingly sophisticated and broad. This state-of-the-art volume presents the most recent research in Arabic linguistics from a theoretical point of view, including computational linguistics, syntax, semantics, and historical linguistics. It also covers sociolinguistics, applied linguistics, and discourse analysis by looking at issues such as gender, urbanization, and language ideology. Underlying themes include the changing and evolving attitudes of speakers of Arabic and theoretical approaches to linguistic variation in the Middle East.
This volume gathers fifteen interdisciplinary papers on the history of Arabic in celebration of the 400th anniversary of the chair of Arabic at Leiden, ranging from the epigraphy of pre-Islamic Arabia to the modern spoken dialects, and everything in between.
This ebook is a selective guide designed to help scholars and students of Islamic studies find reliable sources of information by directing them to the best available scholarly materials in whatever form or format they appear from books, chapters, and journal articles to online archives, electronic data sets, and blogs. Written by a leading international authority on the subject, the ebook provides bibliographic information supported by direct recommendations about which sources to consult and editorial commentary to make it clear how the cited sources are interrelated related. A reader will discover, for instance, the most reliable introductions and overviews to the topic, and the most important publications on various areas of scholarly interest within this topic. In Islamic studies, as in other disciplines, researchers at all levels are drowning in potentially useful scholarly information, and this guide has been created as a tool for cutting through that material to find the exact source you need. This ebook is a static version of an article from Oxford Bibliographies Online: Islamic Studies, a dynamic, continuously updated, online resource designed to provide authoritative guidance through scholarship and other materials relevant to the study of the Islamic religion and Muslim cultures. Oxford Bibliographies Online covers most subject disciplines within the social science and humanities, for more information visit www.aboutobo.com.
Despite the historical and contemporary significance of the Sharia, it has not yet been possible to solve the puzzle of its origins. Whereas previous research has postulated a greater or lesser degree of endogenous Islamic development, the present study reaches a different conclusion, namely that at the end of the 8th century Muslim state lawyers in Baghdad codified an Islamic "Imperial Law", oriented strongly towards Roman-Byzantine law. It is part of an Islamic-Byzantine context, and can only be explained against this intercultural background.

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