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Catalog of an exhibition held at the Museum of Modern Art, New York.
In the late 1920s, conservative policies were the norm among traditional museums--that is, until three progressive patrons of the arts decided to establish an institution devoted exclusively to modern art. When The Museum of Modern Art was founded in 1929, its first director, Alfred H. Barr, Jr., dedicated it to helping people understand and enjoy the new visual arts of the time; his hope was that this new institution would offer New York "perhaps the greatest museum of modern art in the world." The public responded with enthusiasm--and has continued to do so over the history of the Museum's extraordinary development. Published on the occasion of the Museum's 75th birthday and the opening of its new building, "Art in Our Time: A History of The Museum of Modern Art is a picture book of historical photographs and archival documents, many of which have never before been published. Included are images of the various Museum buildings and gardens, from its original home in the Heckscher Building on 57th Street, to its present location in Yoshio Taniguchi's complex on 53rd Street; major exhibitions and important events at the Museum; and photographs of curatorial staff and Museum officials whose discerning policies helped shape our understanding of modern art. Documents include excerpts from letters, invitations, and other archival materials that tell the story of The Museum of Modern Art from its beginnings to the present.
The Encyclopedia of Twentieth-Century Photography explores the vast international scope of twentieth-century photography and explains that history with a wide-ranging, interdisciplinary manner. This unique approach covers the aesthetic history of photography as an evolving art and documentary form, while also recognizing it as a developing technology and cultural force. This Encyclopedia presents the important developments, movements, photographers, photographic institutions, and theoretical aspects of the field along with information about equipment, techniques, and practical applications of photography. To bring this history alive for the reader, the set is illustrated in black and white throughout, and each volume contains a color plate section. A useful glossary of terms is also included.
Editor’s note : These definitions err on the side of succinctness and are intended to be beginning points for the serious student. An attempt to standardize terminology commonly found in the medium of fine arts photographs that avoids copyrighted term or trade names (‘‘dye-destruction print’’ in lieu of ‘‘Cibachrome’’ and so on) has been made using guidelines set forth by the J. Paul Getty Institute. In acknowledgment of the increase in collecting vintage prints and the perennial interest in historical processes, many nineteenth century processes and obsolete terms are included. Cross referencing within the glossary is indicated by italics; encyclopedia entries are indicated by small capitals. Additive colors The primary colors of red, green and blue which are mixed to form all other colors in photo- graphic reproduction. See entry COLOR THEORY: NATURAL AND SYNTHETIC . Agfacolor Trade name for a subtractive color film manufactured by the European company Agfa-Gevaert; analogous to Kodachrome and Ansocolor. Albumen print Prints obtained from a process in wide use during the nineteenth century in which paper is prepared with an albumen emulsion obtained from egg whites and made light sensitive with a silver nitrate solution. See also Collodion process ; Dry plate processes . Amberlith An orange acetate historically used for masking mechanicals during the process of preparing plates for commercial printing. The area so masked photographs as black to the camera, printing clear on the resulting positive film. See also Rubylith . Ambrotype An image created by the collodion process, historically on glass, which gives the illusion of being positive when placed against a dark backing, often a layer of black lacquer, paper, or velvet. Also see Ferrotype . Anamorphic image An image featuring differing scales of magnification across the picture plane, especially varying along the vertical and horizontal axes, with the result being extreme distortion. Aniline A rapid-drying oil-based solvent used in the preparation of dyes and inks for photographic applications. Aniline process A method of making prints directly from line art (drawings) on translucent materials bypassing the need for a negative. Also see Diazo process . Aniline printing See Flexography . Angle of incidence The measurement in degrees in terms of the deviation from the perpendicular of the angle at which light hits a surface. Angle of view The measurement in degrees of the angle formed by lines projected from the optical center of a lens to the edges of the field of view. This measurement is used to identify lenses and their appropriateness to capture various widths or degrees of actual space in a photographic representation, thus an extreme telephoto lens captures between 6 and 15
"How shall the two-dimensional print in black and white suggest the flux of activity of the metropolis, the interaction of human beings and solid architectural constructions, all impinging upon each other in time?" Picturing New York presents myriad answers to this question posed by photographer Berenice Abbott in the 1930s. Depicting the iconic New York that captivates the world's imagination and the idiosyncratic details that define New Yorkers' sense of home, this anthology of photographs from The Museum of Modern Art's extraordinary collection celebrates the city in all its vitality, ambition, and beauty. Made by artists responding to the city as well as professionals on assignment - including Berenice Abbott, Diane Arbus, Harry Callahan, Henri Cartier-Bresson, Walker Evans, Lee Friedlander, Helen Levitt, Lisette Model, Irving Penn, Cindy Sherman, Alfred Stieglitz, Weegee, and many more - the works reveal the deeply symbiotic relationship between photography and New York. Evocative excerpts from literary works about New York and a lively essay by Sarah Hermanson Meister, Associate Curator in the Department of Photography at MoMA, accompany the selection of classic images and lesser-known gems. Both an exploration of the life of the city and a documentation of photography's evolution throughout the twentieth century, Picturing New York celebrates the great and continuing tradition of capturing the grit and glamour of one of America's greatest urban centers.
A reference guide to the history and production of photography provides definitions, biographies, a timeline of photographic milestones, and information on genres and technical and aesthetic achievements.

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