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At the height of their power in the late eleventh century, the Chaco Anasazi dominated a territory in the American Southwest larger than any European principality of the time. Developed over the course of centuries and thriving for over two hundred years, the Chacoans’ society collapsed dramatically in the twelfth century in a mere forty years. David E. Stuart incorporates extensive new research findings through groundbreaking archaeology to explore the rise and fall of the Chaco Anasazi and how it parallels patterns throughout modern societies in this new edition. Adding new research findings on caloric flows in prehistoric times and investigating the evolutionary dynamics induced by these forces as well as exploring the consequences of an increasingly detached central Chacoan decision-making structure, Stuart argues that Chaco’s failure was a failure to adapt to the consequences of rapid growth—including problems with the misuse of farmland, malnutrition, loss of community, and inability to deal with climatic catastrophe. Have modern societies learned from the experience and fate of the Chaco Anasazi, or are we risking a similar cultural collapse?
"This book treats the archaeology of Cyprus from the first-known human presence during the Late Epipalaeolithic (ca. 11,000 BC) through the end of the Bronze Age (ca. 1000 BC)"--
Black Mesa is a large elevated land mass which comprises a part of the Navajo and Hopi Indian reservations in the northeast corner of Arizona—one of the few large areas in the Southwest which had seldom seen the archaeologist’s shovel until the Black Mesa Project. Because of this paucity of excavation, scholars have pointed for years to Black Mesa as the source of many unanswered questions about the prehistory of the surrounding regions. This third volume, Papers on the Archaeology of Black Mesa, Arizona, edited by George J. Gumerman and Robert C. Euler, continues in the series’ tradition to unearth solutions to major archaeological problems long buried on Black Mesa: Who were the inhabitants? How did they live? Why did they abandon Northeastern Black Mesa? What is the cultural relationship of the Black Mesa prehistoric people to the Mesa Verde and Chaco branches? Contributing penetrating explanations and theories to these and other questions, in addition to the editors, are: Leonard W. Blake, Robert T. Clemen, Hugh C. Cutler, Charles L. Douglas, Thor N. V. Karlstrom, Steven E. Sessions, Alan C. Swedlund, and Albert E. Ward. Rich in explications and new dimensions to the prehistory of Black Mesa and the sur­rounding area, this third volume in the Black Mesa series is destined to be an invaluable reference for students and scholars of archaeology and cultural history specializing in the American Southwest.
Ancient Cities is unusual in presenting this wide range of Old World cultures in such comprehensive detail, giving equal weight to the Preclassical and Classical periods and in shoeing the links between these ancient cultures." "Ancient Cities will be essential reading for university students in archaeology, ancient history, and classical studies and will also appeal to students of ancient civilizations at high-school level."--BOOK JACKET.
A thrilling mystery for middle readers follows eleven-year-old Kathy Wicklow who, during her visit to an architectural dig in New Mexico, has frightening visions of a crystal skull that causes her to solve an ancient mystery. Simultaneous.
This magisterial volume unveils Richard and Shirley Flint’s deep research into the Latin American and Spanish archives in an effort to track down the history of the participants who came north with the Coronado expedition in 1540. Through their investigation into thousands of legal cases, financial records, proofs of service, letters, journals, and other primary materials, they provide social and cultural documentation on the backgrounds of hundreds of individuals who made up the Coronado expedition and show that the expedition was the first phase of a three-phase effort to complete the Columbian project: to delineate a westward route to Asia from Spain.
"How meaning is generated in cultural life is a vast and central topic for the social sciences, including archaeology. This book is a must for anyone interested in this area."-Chris Gosden, University of Oxford --

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