Download Free Arctic Daughter Book in PDF and EPUB Free Download. You can read online Arctic Daughter and write the review.

Setting off in an overloaded canoe, they journeyed down the Yukon River and walked upstream into the remote Brooks Range to build a cabin and live off the land. She was twenty-two, daughter of a famous woman adventurer. He was her childhood sweetheart. Four years later, they emerged from the Alaskan wilds. Now in her sixties, Jean Aspen updates her spellbinding tale of adventure in a harsh and beautiful land for a new generation. ARCTIC DAUGHTER is at once an extraordinary journey of self-discovery and a lyrical odyssey. A READER'S DIGEST book selection, this remarkable tale of survival and courage measures the value of dreams against the unforgiving realities of the natural world. First published in 1988 by Bergamot Books, Minneapolis, MN.
The chronicle of a family’s first year alone in Alaskan wilderness, Arctic Son is a poetic journey of discovery into what we value in life. In 1992 Jean Aspen and her husband, Tom, left Arizona and took their young son to live in Alaska's interior wilderness, building a cabin out of logs, hunting for food, and letting the vast, harsh beauty of the Arctic close in around them. While Jean had faced Alaska's wilderness before in a life‐altering experience she described in Arctic Daughter. This journey would be different. Dogged by sickness and hardships, cut off from the rest of the world, her family faced not only a test of endurance, but of its own well‐being and survival. From a daily struggle against the elements to an encounter with a grizzly bear at arm's length, from moments of breathtaking beauty and self‐realization to a harrowing, six‐hundred‐mile river passage back to civilization, Arctic Son chronicles fourteen remarkable months in the Alaskan wilderness. At once a portrait of courage and a heart‐pounding adventure story, Arctic Son portrays a family's extraordinary journey into America's last frontier.
The Flight of the Arctic Tern, first published in 1952, chronicles the travels and adventures of husband and wife Constance and Harmon Helmericks. Beginning in Connecticut, then flying across Canada to the north of Alaska in a Cessna 140, the couple begin a lifelong pioneering adventure of living simply in the wilds of Alaska.
After author Shannon Huffman Polson’s parents are killed by a wild grizzly bear in Alaska’s Arctic, her quest for healing is recounted with heartbreaking candor in North of Hope. Undergirded by her faith, Polson’s expedition takes her through her through the wilds of her own grief as well as God’s beautiful, yet wild and untamed creation—ultimately arriving at a place of unshaken hope. She travels from the suburbs of Seattle to the concert hall, performing Mozart’s Requiem with the Seattle Symphony, to the wilderness of Alaska—where she retraces their final days along an Arctic river. This beautifully written book is for anyone who has experienced grief and is looking for new ways to understand overwhelming loss. Readers will find empathy and understanding through Polson’s journey. North of Hope is also for those who love the outdoors and find solace and healing in nature, as they experience Alaska’s wild Arctic through the author’s travels.
In suburban Arizona, 1964, Connie Helmericks announced to her two daughters, 12-year-old Ann and 14-year-old Jean, "We're going to make a canoe expedition to the Arctic Ocean." And for two successive summers, that's exactly what they did. Down the Wild River North is the vividly told story of their adventures in the remote northern reaches of Canada and the Arctic, in a twenty-foot canoe, amidst a wondrous and vast landscape. A wilderness adventure, and a story of family bonds and spiritual renewal.
The Frozen Toe Guide to Real Alaskan Livin' both embraces and instructs readers on everything one needs to know to be a true Alaskan, or at least to look the part. Combining both handbook format with anecdotal bits about the author’s own experiences moving to the state, the book advises readers on such topics ranging from winter survival skills to regional fashion to Alaskan dating advice to extreme sports. Learn how to make ice cream from snow, or how to seek out a career in dog mushing. Find out where to travel for weekend trips, and what Alaskans do for entertainment.
All her life, Katherine Keith has hungered for remote, wild places that fill her soul with freedom and peace. Her travels take her across America, but it is in the vast and rugged landscape of Alaska that she finds her true home. Alaska is known as a place where people disappear—at least a couple thousand go missing each year. But the same vast and rugged landscape that contributed to so many people being lost is precisely what has gotten her found. She and her husband build a log cabin miles away from the nearest road and create a life of love. An idyllic existence, but with isolation and brutal living conditions can also come heartbreak. Chopping wood and hauling water are not just parts of a Zen proverb but a requirement for survival. Keith experiences tragic loss and must push on, with her infant daughter, alone in the Alaskan backcountry. Long-distance dog sledding opens a door to a new existence. Racing across the state of Alaska offers the best of all worlds by combining raw wilderness with solitude and athleticism. The Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race, the “Last Great Race on Earth,” remains a true test of character and offers the opportunity to intimately explore the frontier that she has come to love. With every thousand miles of winter trail traversed in total solitude, she confronts challenges that awaken internal demons, summoning all the inner grief and rage that lies dormant. In the tradition of Cheryl Strayed’s Wild and John Krakauer’s Into the Wild, Epic Solitude is the powerful and touching story of how one woman found her way—both despite and because of—the difficulties of living and racing in the remote wilderness.

Best Books