Download Free Arguing About Law An Introduction To Legal Philosophy Book in PDF and EPUB Free Download. You can read online Arguing About Law An Introduction To Legal Philosophy and write the review.

Using the rule of law as its main theme, this text shows how abstract questions and concepts of legal philosophy are connected to concrete legal, political, and social issues. The text addresses several modern controversies and challenges students to consider both sides of an argument, using sound, reasoned thinking.
Arguing about Law introduces philosophy of law in an accessible and engaging way. The reader covers a wide range of topics, from general jurisprudence, law, the state and the individual, to topics in normative legal theory, as well as the theoretical foundations of public and private law. In addition to including many classics, Arguing About Law also includes both non-traditional selections and discussion of timely topical issues like the legal dimension of the war on terror. The editors provide lucid introductions to each section in which they give an overview of the debate and outline the arguments of the papers, helping the student get to grips with both the classic and core arguments and emerging debates in: the nature of law legality and morality the rule of law the duty to obey the law legal enforcement of sexual morality the nature of rights rights in an age of terror constitutional theory tort theory. Arguing About Law is an inventive and stimulating reader for students new to philosophy of law, legal theory and jurisprudence.
The controversy surrounding targeted killings represents a crisis of conscience for policymakers, lawyers, philosophers and leading military experts grappling with the moral and legal limits of the war on terror. The book examines the legal and philosophical issues raised by government efforts to target suspected terrorists without giving them the safeguards of a fair trial.
Philosophy of Law: An Introductionprovides an ideal starting point to students of philosophy and law, assuming no prior knowledge of either subject. The book is structured around the key issues and themes: * What is the law? - the major legal theories including realism, positivism and natural law * the reach of the law - authority, rights, liberty, privacy and tolerance * criminal responsibility and punishment - legal defenses, crime, diminished responsibility and theories of punishment. The second edition expands the original focus on mainstream legal theory to look at contemporary critical perspectives such as feminist theories on pornography and freedom of speech, and Foucault's radical approach to criminal responsibility. The book has also been updated to include recent developments such as cases of conjoined twins, and the Human Rights Act. With study questions at the end of each chapter and a new conclusion assessing both traditional legal theory and the various critical perspectives, this is the ideal textbook for introducing students to the philosophy of law.
The articles in this new edition of A Companion to Philosophy ofLaw and Legal Theory have been updated throughout, and theaddition of ten new articles ensures that the volume continues tooffer the most up-to-date coverage of current thinking inlegal philosophy. Represents the definitive handbook of philosophy of law andcontemporary legal theory, invaluable to anyone with an interest inlegal philosophy Now features ten entirely new articles, covering the areas ofrisk, regulatory theory, methodology, overcriminalization,intention, coercion, unjust enrichment, the rule of law, law andsociety, and Kantian legal philosophy Essays are written by an international team of leadingscholars
A Liberal Theory of International Justice advances a novel theory of international justice that combines the orthodox liberal notion that the lives of individuals are what ultimately matter morally with the putatively antiliberal idea of an irreducibly collective right of self-governance. The individual and her rights are placed at center stage insofar as political states are judged legitimate if they adequately protect the human rights of their constituents and respect the rights of all others. Yet, the book argues that legitimate states have a moral right to self-determination and that this right is inherently collective, irreducible to the individual rights of the persons who constitute them. Exploring the implications of these ideas, the book addresses issues pertaining to democracy, secession, international criminal law, armed intervention, political assassination, global distributive justice, and immigration. A number of the positions taken in the book run against the grain of current academic opinion: there is no human right to democracy; separatist groups can be morally entitled to secede from legitimate states; the fact that it is a matter of brute luck whether one is born in a wealthy state or a poorer one does not mean that economic inequalities across states must be minimized or even kept within certain limits; most existing states have no right against armed intervention; and it is morally permissible for a legitimate state to exclude all would-be immigrants.
This advanced introduction to central questions in legal philosophy attempts to breathe new life into stalled research.

Best Books