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Provides a comprehensive guide to climate change law in Australia and internationally, focusing on Australia's implementation of climate-related treaties.
In Climate Change Law in China in Global Context, seven climate change law scholars explain how the country’s legal system is gradually being mobilized to support the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions in China and achieve adaptation to climate change. There has been little English scholarship on the legal regime for climate change in China. This volume addresses this gap in the literature and focuses on recent attempts by the country to build defences against the impacts of climate change and to meet the country’s international obligations on mitigation. The authors are not only interested in China’s laws on paper; rather, the book explains how these laws are implemented and integrated in practice and sheds light on China’s current laws, laws in preparation, the changing standing of law relative to policy, and the further reforms that will be necessary in response to the 2015 Paris Agreement on Climate Change. This comprehensive and critical account of the Chinese legal system’s response to the pressures of climate change will be an important resource for scholars of international law, environmental law, and Chinese law.
The new edition of Regina S. Axelrod and Stacy D. VanDeveer’s award-winning volume, The Global Environment: Institutions, Law, and Policy, reflects the latest events in global environmental politics and sustainable development while providing balanced coverage of the key institutions, issues, laws, and policies. The volume has been reorganized to better highlight global environmental institutions, major state and non-state actors, and includes an expanded set of cases such as climate change, biodiversity, hazardous chemicals, ozone layer depletion, nuclear energy and resource consumption. Based on reviewer feedback, the new edition broadens coverage of the growing global environmental agenda and explores the relationships between states, NGOs, and international organizations.
Climate Law in Australia provides the first extended account of Australia's new climate law. It examines key federal and state legislation and the main cases brought before Australian courts. It combines incisive legal analysis with a deep understanding of climate-related issues and policy. The authors include leading academics such as Professors Robyn Eckersley, David Farrier, Rob Fowler and Jan McDonald, and leading practitioners such as Charles Berger, Kirsty Ruddock, Chris McGrath, Allison Warburton and Martijn Wilder. The editors are Professor Tim Bonyhady, Director of the Australian Centre for Environmental Law at the Australian National University, and Dr Peter Christoff of the University of Melbourne and Vice President of the Australian Conservation Foundation. The book examines pivotal issues in Australian climate law and policy - the Kyoto Protocol and its alternatives, emissions targets, carbon trading, geosequestration, nuclear decision-making, adaptation to climate change and legal liability. It contains detailed analysis of the leading cases involving the Hazelwood power station, the Anvil Hill, Xstrata and Bowen Basin coal mines, and the Bald Hills and Taralga wind farms. Climate Law in Australia explores both the need for conventional legal regulation and the potential of economic responses to climate change. It shows how climate law has grown in Australia - and how far the law still has to go.
The international community has long grappled with the issue of safeguarding the environment and encouraging sustainable development, often with little result. The 1992 Rio Declaration on Environment and Development was an emphatic attempt to address this issue, setting down 27 key principles for the international community to follow. These principles define the rights of people to sustainable development, and the responsibilities of states to safeguard the common environment. The Rio Declaration established that long term economic progress required a connection to environmental protection. It was designed as an authoritative and comprehensive statement of the principles of sustainable development law, an instrument to take stock of the past international and domestic practice, a guide for the design of new multilateral environmental regimes, and as a reference for litigation. This commentary provides an authoritative and comprehensive overview of the principles of the Declaration, written by over thirty inter-disciplinary contributors, including both leading practitioners and academics. Each principle is analysed in light of its origins and rationale. The book investigates each principle's travaux préparatoires setting out the main points of controversy and the position of different countries or groups. It analyses the scope and dimensions of each principle, providing an in-depth understanding of its legal effects, including whether it can be relied before a domestic or international court. It also assesses the impact of the principles on subsequent soft law and treaty development, as well as domestic and international jurisprudence. The authors demonstrate the ways in which the principles interact with each other, and finally provide a detailed analysis of the shortcomings and future potential of each principle. This book will be of vital importance to practitioners, scholars, and students of international environomental law and sustainable development.
The book principally addresses climate change and describes the remedial strategies for developing countries based on the 'Clean Development Mechanism' of the 'Kyoto Protocol'. It provides a very comprehensive account of the array of proposals and economic instruments devised by the international community - including the Joint Implementation and Emissions Trading initiatives of the Protocol - to abate global warming. The effects of other major atmospheric, land and water pollutants from industries and domestic sources are also covered.
The book advances knowledge about climate change adaptationpractices through a series of case studies. It presents importantevidence about adaptation practices in agriculture, businesses, thecoastal zone, community services, disaster management, ecosystems,indigneous populations, and settlements and infrastructure. Inaddition to 38 case studies across these sectors, the book containshorizon-scoping essays from international experts in adaptationresearch, including Hallie Eakin, Susanne Moser, Jonathon Overpeck,Bill Solecki, and Gary Yohe. Australia’s social-ecological systems have a long historyof adapting to climate variability and change, and in recentdecades has been a world-leader in implementing and researchingadaptation, making this book of universal relevance to all thoseworking to adapt our environment and societies to climatechange.
How do dominant views and arguments about environmental problems traverse and connect international and public law?
The book examines whether the jurisdiction of coastal States under international law can be extended to include powers of intervention towards vessels posing a significant risk to their coastal and marine environment, but which have not yet been involved in any incident or accident. The books sets out how it is that coastal State jurisdiction can indeed be seen as including powers of intervention towards High Risks Vessels before an incident or accident happens, on the basis of the precautionary principle. The precautionary principle requires taking action when a risk of damage to the environment is suspected, but cannot be confirmed scientifically.The book thus considers the potential opportunities for the coastal state under international law to regulate international shipping where they consider vessels to an unacceptable risk to the environment, in order to prevent or minimise the risk of occurrence of the accident or incident leading to damage. The book acknowledges that this puts into question some very old and established principles of the law of the sea, most importantly the principle of freedom of navigation. But Bénédicte Sage-Fuller contends that this change would itself be a consequence of the evolution, since the end of WWII, of on the one hand international law of the sea itself, and of international environmental law on the other hand.
The IUCN Academy of Environmental Law Research Studies' third colloquium of 2005 brought together more than 130 experts from 27 nations on nearly every continent. This book brings together a number of the papers presented there and offers a global perspective on biodiversity conservation and the maintenance of sustainable cultures. It addresses issues from international, regional, and country-specific perspectives. The book is organized thematically to present a broad spectrum of issues, including the history and major governance structures in this area; the needs, problems, and prerequisites for biodiversity; area-based, species-based, and ecosystem-based conservation measures; the use of components of biodiversity and the processes affecting it; biosecurity; and access to and sharing of benefits from components of biodiversity and their economic value.
Educating girls and women is a powerful route to improving societies worldwide. When women receive more education, literacy rates in children rise, maternal and infant death rates drop, and women enjoy an increased earning capacity. Yet in parts of the developing world, women’s education is considered a low priority at best and a dangerous countercultural activity at worst. In Europe and North America, the number of women’s colleges is shrinking—yet women-only institutions are growing in size and number in many other regions of the world, where they provide access to female students who are prevented for legal, cultural, religious, or practical reasons from attending coeducational universities. Women’s Colleges and Universities in a Global Context is the first book to provide a comprehensive comparative analysis of the increasing significance of single-sex higher education institutions for women around the world. Based on Kristen A. Renn’s on-site study of thirteen women’s colleges and universities in ten different countries—Australia, Canada, China, India, Italy, Japan, Kenya, South Korea, the United Arab Emirates, and the United Kingdom—this timely and provocative volume combines interviews of campus leaders, faculty, and students with extensive online and archival research. Renn provides an overview of each country’s political, economic, and educational situation, then explores the theoretical and practical themes she uncovers in their educational institutions for women. In the end, this volume addresses not only the role of women’s colleges in their own countries but also what these institutions can teach us that would benefit higher education worldwide.
This challenging book takes a broad and thought-provoking look at the precautionary principle and its implementation, or potential implementation, in a number of fields. In particular, the essays within the book explore the challenges faced by public decision-making processes when applying the precautionary principle, including its role in risk management and risk assessment. Frameworks for improved decision making are considered, followed by a detailed analysis of prospective applications of the precautionary principle in a number of emerging fields including: nanotechnology, climate change.
Climate change on a global scale has been described as 'the mother of all environmental issues', with many scientists warning of the dire consequences already facing us, even if remedial action is undertaken immediately. It is almost certainly the largest, most difficult environmental challenge the world now faces. And it has also provided the Australian federal government with one of its most awkward political issues - with the nation being transformed in the eyes of many from a world environmental leader into an international pariah. Running from the Storm is a timely book from one of Australia's most prominent commentator on the issue. It provides a lively, comprehensive and provocative account of the key issues that affect climate change policy in Australia. It details the many policy failures, the murky politics of climate change, the corruption of the policy process, the influence of the fossil-fuel industries on our politicians and policy makers, and the ethical issues that underpin the public debate. All of these are discussed in the context of the momentous international developments before and after the landmark Kyoto Protocol in December 1997.
Police organizations across the globe are experiencing major changes. Many nations cope with funding constraints as pressures within their societies, terrorism and transnational crime, and social and political transformations necessitate a more democratic form of policing. Drawn from the proceedings at the International Police Executive Symposium i
This edited collection, the result of an international seminar held at the International Institute for the Sociology of Law, Oñati, Spain in 2010, explores the potential legal and criminological consequences of climate change, both domestically and for the international community. A novel feature of the book is the consideration given to the potential synergies between the two disciplinary foci, thus to encourage among legal scholars and criminologists not only an analysis of the consequences of climate change from these perspectives but to bring these fields together to provide a unique, inter-disciplinary exploration of the ways in which climate change does, or could, impact on our societies. Such an inter-disciplinary approach is necessary given that climate change is a multifaceted phenomenon and one which is intimately linked across disciplines. To study this topic from the point of view of a single social science discipline restricts our understanding of the societal consequences of climate change. It is hoped that this edited collection will identify emerging areas of concern, illuminate areas for further research and, most of all, encourage future academic discussion on this most critical of issues.
Explores normative and institutional innovation in international law as a response to the challenges to global order posed by rapid environmental change.
This book explores the impacts of global economic, political and cultural shifts on various international legal frameworks and legal norms. The economic growth of states throughout Asia, South and Central America and Africa is having a profound effect on the dynamics of international relations, with a resulting impact on the operation and development of international law. This book examines the influence of emerging economies on international legal rules, institutions and processes. It describes recent and predicted changes in economic, political and cultural powers, flowing from the growth of emerging economies such as China, India, Brazil, South Africa and Russia, and analyses the influence of these changes on various legal frameworks and norms. Expert contributors drawn from a variety of fields, including international law, politics, environmental law, human rights, economics and finance, provide a broad analysis of the nature of the shifting global dynamic in its historical and contemporary contexts, and a range of perspectives on the impact of these changes as they relate to specific regimes and issues, including climate change regulation, collective security, indigenous rights, the rights of women and girls, environmental protection and foreign aid and development. The book provides a fresh and comprehensive analysis of an issue with extensive implications for international law and politics. Shifting Global Powers and International Law will be of interest to students and scholars of international relations; international law; international political economy, human rights; and development.
Australia has a long, rich and significant history in Antarctic affairs. Since 1933 Australia has asserted a claim to 42 per cent of the continent as the Australian Antarctic Territory. Australia was an original signatory to the 1959 Antarctic Treaty and has subsequently played an active role in international governance of Antarctica under the Antarctic Treaty System (ATS). Almost half a century after the adoption of the Antarctic Treaty, and in the first decade of the 21st century, Antarctica is better known but is still not completely understood to science. It has been designated a natural reserve devoted to peace and science and whilst some matters, such as mining, have been put on hold, other issues present both continuing and new challenges. These challenges include the implications for Antarctica of global climate change, and indeed the continent's role in the generation of the world's weather; the environmental, political and ethical implications of increasing human activity in the region; and the goals of maintaining or developing the most appropriate governance mechanisms given the complex legal circumstances. There had been no contemporary analysis of Australia's involvement in Antarctic matters until 1984 when "Australia's Antarctic Policy Options", edited by Professor Stuart Harris, brought together a diverse and intellectually powerful array of Australians focussed on Antarctic law, policy and the social sciences. This volume provided a benchmark by which to measure the tenor of Australia's Antarctic agenda and as such has been of great assistance to the development of Looking South. Consequently, 20 years on Looking South explores how the issues identified have developed, what significant new issues have emerged and how Antarctica is placed in the current political Australian agenda.

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