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Three and a half centuries before Google Maps there was... Joan Blaeu's atlas, the finest ever published "There can be few books out there more jaw-droppingly gorgeous than this extraordinary Atlas. The reprint more than does justice to Blaeu's masterpiece." TNT Magazine, London The finest and most comprehensive baroque atlas was Joan Blaeu's exceptional Atlas Maior, completed in 1665. The original 11-volume Latin edition, containing 536 maps, put Blaeu ahead of his staunch competitor, mapmaker Johannes Janssonius, whose rivalry inspired Blaeu to produce a grandiose edition of the largest and most complete atlas to date. Covering Arctica, Europe, Africa, Asia, and America, Blaeu's Atlas Maior was a remarkable achievement and remains to this day one of history's finest examples of mapmaking. This reprint is made from the National Library of Vienna's complete, colored, gold-heightened copy, thus assuring the best possible detail and quality. The book's introduction, by the University of Utrecht's Peter van der Krogt, discusses the historical and cultural context and significance of the atlas; Krogt also provides detailed descriptions of the maps, allowing modern readers to fully appreciate Blaeu's masterwork. Text in English, French, and German
Maps of Italy from Joan Blaeu's exquisite world atlas of 1665 The finest and most comprehensive baroque atlas was Joan Blaeu's exceptional Atlas Maior, completed in 1665. The original eleven-volume Latin edition, containing 594 maps, put Blaeu ahead of his staunch competitor, mapmaker Joanes Janssonius, whose rivalry inspired Blaeu to produce a grandiose edition of the largest and most complete atlas to date. Covering Arctica, Europe, Africa, Asia, and America, Blaeu's Atlas Maior was a remarkable achievement and remains to this day one of history's finest examples of mapmaking. This reprint, including all 60 maps of Italy, is made from the National Library of Vienna's colored, gold-heightened copy, thus assuring the best possible detail and quality. Alongside original quotes from Joan Blaeu relating to the individual maps, the new text by Peter van der Krogt explains the historical and cultural associations and introduces the reader into the fascinating world of early modern cartography. The text is in Italian, English and German. The author: Peter van der Krogt, the leading expert in the field of Dutch atlases, is a collaborator on the Explokart Research Program for the History of Cartography at the University of Utrecht's Faculty of Geosciences. Since 1990 he has been working on Koeman's Atlantes Neerlandici, the carto-bibliography of atlases published in the Netherlands. His second project is the compilation, in co-operation with the Nijmegen University, of an illustrated and annotated catalogue of the Atlas Blaeu-Van der Hem, the most important multi-volume atlas preserved in the Austrian National Library, which was added to Unesco's ?Memory of the World? register in 2004.
The Atlas Maior, the cartographical masterpiece of the Baroque period, was brought out between 1662 and 1665 by the Amsterdam publisher Joan Blaeu, one of Holland’s leading cartographers. Originally appearing in Latin, the atlas comprised 594 maps in 11 volumes, which depicted the whole of the world as known to early modern Europe. It was the largest and most expensive book published during the 17th century. For more than 100 years it remained the definitive atlas of the world, and today is among the most sought-after and valuable antiquarian rarities. This reprinted edition in six volumes is based on the hand-colored, gold-heightened copy in the Österreichische Nationalbibliothek in Vienna, thus ensuring the best possible detail and quality. Alongside Joan Blaeu’s original commentaries on the individual maps, a new text by Peter van der Krogt explains the historical and cultural associations and introduces the reader to the fascinating world of early modern cartography. This volume features all 60 maps of Italy and the text is in Italian, English, and German.
A complete descriptive and illustrated catalogue of one of the largest and finest atlases ever assembled. Now housed in the Österreichische Nationalbibliothek in Vienna, the 46-volume atlas is an expanded version of Joan Blaeu's Atlas Maior or 'Great Atlas', published in Amsterdam between 1660 and 1663. Though the core of the atlas consists of the several hundred maps issued by Blaeu, the original owner of the atlas, Laurens van der Hem (1621-1678), added other maps, views, and drawings of his own choice, including four volumes of manuscript maps of Africa and Asia made for the Dutch East India Company (VOC). The practice of augmenting atlases was common in the seventeenth century, but few of these personalized atlases have survived the centuries. The catalogue in 7 volumes (plus a volume about the making of the facsimile) will include all the sheets in the atlas reproduced in black-and-white, with cartographical historical and arthistorical descriptions by P. van der Krogt and E. de Groot. Each volume will contain approximately 16 full-colour illustrations. I. Spain, Portugal and France (vols. 1-8). 1996. With about 700 illustrations. 632 pp. ISBN 978 90 6194 278 8 II. Italy, Malta, Switzerland and the Netherlands (vols. 9-17). 1999. With about 700 illustrations. 732 pp. ISBN 978 90 6194 348 8 III. British Isles, northern and eastern Europe (vols. 18-24). 2002. With about 700 illustrations. 552 pp. ISBN 978 90 6194 189 7 IV. German Empire, Hungary and Greece, including Asia Minor. Descriptive catalogue of the vols. 25-34 of the Atlas. 2004. Sm.folio. Cloth. With about 800 illustrations, including 16 in colour. 708 pp. ISBN 978 90 6194 179 8 V. Africa, Asia and America, including the "Secret" Atlas of the Dutch East India Company (VOC). Descriptive catalogue of volumes 35-46 of the Atlas. 2005. Sm. folio. Cloth. With about 700 illustrations, including 17 in colour. 640 pp. ISBN 978 90 6194 199 6 VI. Descriptive catalogue of volumes 47-50 (E1-E4) of the Atlas and general indices. 2008. Sm. Folio. Cloth. With about 300 illustrations. Approx. 500 pp. ISBN 978 90 6194 439 3 VII. Groot, E. de. The world of a seventeenth-century collector. The Atlas Blaeu-Van der Hem. 2006. Sm. folio. Cloth, with full colour dustjacket. With 150 black & white and 16 colour illustrations. 395 pp. ISBN 978 90 6194 359 4 VIII. The Atlas Blaeu-Van der Hem. The history of the Atlas and the making of the facsimile. An accompanying publication with background information on the Atlas Blaeu-Van der Hem and the production of the facsimile. Cloth with full colour dust jacket. 244 pp. 137 full colour illustrations. ISBN 978 90 6194 300 6.
A novel work in the history of cartography, The Sovereign Map argues that maps are as much about thinking as seeing, as much about the art of persuasion as the science of geography. As a classicist, Christian Jacob brings a fresh eye to his subject—which includes maps from Greek Antiquity to the twentieth century—and provides a theoretical approach to investigating the power of maps to inform, persuade, and inspire the imagination. Beginning with a historical overview of maps and their creation—from those traced in the dirt by primitive hands to the monumental Dutch atlases and ornate maps on Italian palace walls—Jacob goes on to consider the visual components of cartography: the decorative periphery, geometric grid, topographical lines, dots, details of iconographic figures, and many other aspects. Considering text on maps—titles, toponyms, legends, and keys—Jacob proposes that writing can both clarify and interfere with a map's visual presentation. Finally Jacob examines the role of the viewer in decoding a map's meaning and the role of society in defining the power of maps as authoritative depictions of space. Innovative in its philosophical motivation and its interdisciplinary approach to looking at and writing about maps, The Sovereign Map is eagerly awaited by scholars from many different fields.
Over the course of ten centuries, Islam developed a rich written heritage that is visible in paintings, calligraphies, and manuscripts. The Islamic Manuscript Tradition explores this aspect of Islamic history with studies of the materials and tools of literate culture, including pens, inks, and papers, Qur'ans, Persian and Mughal illustrated manuscripts, Ottoman devotional works, cartographical manuscripts, printed books, and Islamic erotica. Seven essays present new scholarship on a wide range of topics including collection, miniaturization, illustrated devotional books, the history of the printing press in Islamic lands, and the presence and function of erotic paintings. This beautifully produced volume includes 111 color illustrations and provides a valuable new resource for students and scholars of Islamic art.
Jerry Brotton is the presenter of the acclaimed BBC4 series 'Maps: Power, Plunder and Possession'. Here he tells the story of our world through maps. Throughout history, maps have been fundamental in shaping our view of the world, and our place in it. But far from being purely scientific objects, world maps are unavoidably ideological and subjective, intimately bound up with the systems of power and authority of particular times and places. Mapmakers do not simply represent the world, they construct it out of the ideas of their age. In this scintillating book, Jerry Brotton examines the significance of 12 maps - from the mystical representations of ancient history to the satellite-derived imagery of today. He vividly recreates the environments and circumstances in which each of the maps was made, showing how each conveys a highly individual view of the world - whether the Jerusalem-centred Christian perspective of the 14th century Hereford Mappa Mundi or the Peters projection of the 1970s which aimed to give due weight to 'the third world'. Although the way we map our surroundings is once more changing dramatically, Brotton argues that maps today are no more definitive or objective than they have ever been - but that they continue to make arguments and propositions about the world, and to recreate, shape and mediate our view of it. Readers of this book will never look at a map in quite the same way again.
The untold story of how the Dutch conquered the European book market and became the world's greatest bibliophiles The Dutch Golden Age has long been seen as the age of Rembrandt and Vermeer, whose paintings captured the public imagination and came to represent the marvel that was the Dutch Republic. Yet there is another, largely overlooked marvel in the Dutch world of the seventeenth century: books. In this fascinating account, Andrew Pettegree and Arthur der Weduwen show how the Dutch produced many more books than pictures and bought and owned more books per capita than any other part of Europe. Key innovations in marketing, book auctions, and newspaper advertising brought stability to a market where elsewhere publishers faced bankruptcy, and created a population uniquely well-informed and politically engaged. This book tells for the first time the remarkable story of the Dutch conquest of the European book world and shows the true extent to which these pious, prosperous, quarrelsome, and generous people were shaped by what they read.
When the University of Chicago Press launched the landmark History of Cartography series nearly thirty years ago, founding editors J.B. Harley and David Woodward hoped to create a new basis for map history. They did not, however, anticipate the larger renaissance in map studies that the series would inspire. But as the renown of the series and the comprehensiveness and acuity of the present volume demonstrate, the history of cartography has proven to be unexpectedly fertile ground. Cartography in the European Renaissance treats the period from 1450 to 1650, long considered the most important in the history of European mapping. This period witnessed a flowering in the production of maps comparable to that in the fields of literature and fine arts. Scientific advances, appropriations of classical mapping techniques, burgeoning trade routes—all such massive changes drove an explosion in the making and using of maps. While this volume presents detailed histories of mapping in such well-documented regions as Italy and Spain, it also breaks significant new ground by treating Renaissance Europe in its most expansive geographical sense, giving careful attention to often-neglected regions like Scandinavia, East-Central Europe, and Russia, and by providing innovative interpretive essays on the technological, scientific, cultural, and social aspects of cartography. Lavishly illustrated with more than a thousand maps, many in color, the two volumes of Cartography in the European Renaissance will be the unsurpassable standard in its field, both defining it and propelling it forward.
This four-volume work contains all of Monet's 2000 pictures, as well as almost 100 rediscovered canvases. The first volume acts as an introduction to Monet's life, and the others present his complete work in chronological, historical and scientific terms.

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