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People of Red Rocket Rising, my fellow citizens. Our long night is over. I've been contacted by a benevolent people. They too have known great trials, but they have overcome them and made it their mission to help others do the same. They have offered us refuge, and passage to the nearest human worlds. They have the resources, and the patience and compassion, to evacuate every one of us. My fellow citizens, my friends, rescue is at hand!
The Daleks are advancing, their empire constantly expanding. The battles rage on across countless solar systems – and the Doctor finds himself stranded on board a starship near the frontline with a group of ruthless bounty hunters. Earth Command will pay these hunters for every Dalek they kill, every eyestalk they bring back as proof. With the Doctor's help, the bounty hunters achieve the ultimate prize: a Dalek prisoner – intact, powerless, and ready for interrogation. But with the Daleks, nothing is what it seems, and no one is safe. Before long the tables will be turned, and how will the Doctor survive when he becomes a prisoner of the Daleks? An adventure featuring the Tenth Doctor, as played by David Tennant
With unfinished business to attend to, the Seventh Doctor returns to where it all began: Coal Hill School in London in 1963. Last time he was here, the Doctor left something behind – a powerful Time Lord artefact that could unlock the secrets of time travel. Can the Doctor retrieve it before two rival factions of Daleks track it down? And even if he can, how will the Doctor prevent the whole of London becoming a war zone as the Daleks meet in explosive confrontation? An adventure featuring the Seventh Doctor as played by Sylvester McCoy and his companion Ace
The Daleks are one of the most iconic and fearsome creations in television history. Since their first appearance in 1963, they have simultaneously fascinated and terrified generations of children, their instant success ensuring, and sometimes eclipsing, that of Doctor Who. They sprang from the imagination of Terry Nation, a failed stand-up comic who became one of the most prolific writers for television that Britian ever produced. Survivors, his vision of a post-apocalyptic England, so haunted audiences in the Seventies that the BBC revived it over thirty years on, and Blake’s 7, constantly rumored for return, endures as a cult sci-fi classic. But it is for his genocidal pepperpots that Nation is most often remembered, and on the 50th anniversary of their creation they continue to top the Saturday-night ratings. Yet while the Daleks brought him notoriety and riches, Nation played a much wider role in British broadcasting’s golden age. He wrote for Spike Milligan, Frankie Howerd and an increasingly troubled Tony Hancock, and as one of the key figures behind the adventure series of the Sixties – including The Avengers, The Saint and The Persuaders! – he turned the pulp classics of his boyhood into a major British export. In The Man Who Invented the Daleks, acclaimed cultural historian Alwyn W. Turner, explores the curious and contested origins of Doctor Who's greatest villains, and sheds light on a strange world of ambitious young writers, producers and performers without whom British culture today would look very different.
For the first time, the never-before-told history of the Doctor’s most dangerous enemy, the Daleks, from their genesis thousands of years ago to their conquest of the universe. Doctor Who: Dalek, is the one and only volume devoted solely to the history of the Doctor’s greatest enemy. The Daleks, with their watchword cry "Exterminate!", are a race of cyborg aliens single-mindedly determined to conquer the universe and end all life forms they consider inferior. First appearing on Doctor Who in 1963, the Daleks are among the show’s most popular villains. Reminiscent of human-sized pepper shakers, the external mechanical casing of the Dalek protects a soft, repulsive creature whose electronic voice is reduced to a squeak when outside of its shell. Doctor Who: Dalek chronicles the Daleks’ genesis through the Time War and their ongoing conquest of the universe. Here are never-before-told stories about these legendary creatures—including terrifying near-mythical adventures, startling visual recreations of secret conflicts, and more. Each story sheds new light on what has become the most feared alien race in the universe. With a foreword by showrunner Steven Moffat, full-color illustrations, concept art, cutaways, diagrams, comic strips and more, Doctor Who: Dalek is the ultimate celebration of all things Dalek and a must have for devoted Whovians of every age.
Doctor Who has always contained a rich current of religious themes and ideas. In its very first episode it asked how humans rationalize the seemingly supernatural, as two snooping schoolteachers refused to accept that the TARDIS was real. More recently it has toyed with the mystery of Doctor's real name, perhaps an echo of ancient religions and rituals in which knowledge of the secret name of a god, angel or demon was thought to grant a mortal power over the entity. But why does Doctor Who intersect with religion so often, and what do such instances tell us about the society that produces the show and the viewers who engage with it? The writers of Religion and Doctor Who: Time and Relative Dimensions in Faith attempt to answer these questions through an in-depth analysis of the various treatments of religion throughout every era of the show's history. While the majority of chapters focus on the television show Doctor Who, the authors also look at audios, novels, and the response of fandom. Their analyses--all written in an accessible but academically thorough style--reveal that examining religion in a long-running series such as Doctor Who can contribute to a number of key debates within faith communities and religious history. Most importantly, it provides another way of looking at why Doctor Who continues to inspire, to engage, and to excite generations of passionate fans, whatever their position on faith. The contributors are drawn from the UK, the USA, and Australia, and their approaches are similarly diverse. Chapters have been written by film scholars and sociologists; theologians and historians; rhetoricians, philosophers and anthropologists. Some write from the perspective of a particular faith or belief; others write from the perspective of no religious belief. All, however, demonstrate a solid knowledge of and affection for the brilliance of Doctor Who.

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