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From the ancient Etruscans and Romans, to the Renaissance masters of Michelangelo and Raphael, the Vatican Museums represent an aspect of the history of humanity through art. The Indigenous Australian collection is a little known and an unexplored part of that story. Being amongst some of the earliest known documentations of Australian Indigenous cultures, the collection includes the earliest extant set of Pukumani poles from Melville and Bathurst Islands alongside more recent contributions of artworks and cultural objects, and presents materials that have not been exhibited before in Australia. The responsibility to culturally reconnect relevant contemporary Indigenous communities to their material heritage held in the museum has been realized and is documented in this catalog, which includes a catalog of objects, and essays by Indigenous and non-Indigenous authors. During the process of community visits and consultations, images of the objects brought old and young people together, instigating intergenerational dialogue about the past. Now, in collaboration with communities, the Indigenous collection can be seen in this catalogue and is represented at the heart of the Vatican Museums where the objects have become cultural ambassadors inviting others to come and learn more about Australian Indigenous cultures.
Dark Emu puts forward an argument for a reconsideration of the hunter-gatherer tag for pre-colonial Aboriginal Australians. The evidence insists that Aboriginal people right across the continent were using domesticated plants, sowing, harvesting, irrigating and storing - behaviors inconsistent with the hunter-gatherer tag. Gerritsen and Gammage in their latest books support this premise but Pascoe takes this further and challenges the hunter-gatherer tag as a convenient lie. Almost all the evidence comes from the records and diaries of the Australian explorers, impeccable sources.
Anthology of Indigenous authored fiction (poetry, short story, short film script and a tweetyarn) by emerging and established writers from around Australia.
A collection of stories and essays by the award-winning author of Dark Emu, showcasing his shimmering genius across a lifetime of work. This volume of Bruce Pascoe’s best and most celebrated stories and essays, collected here for the first time, traverses his long career and explores his enduring fascination with Australia’s landscape, culture and history. Featuring new fiction alongside Pascoe’s most revered and thought-provoking nonfiction – including from his modern classic Dark Emu – Salt distils the intellect, passion and virtuosity of his work. It’s time all Australians know the range and depth of this most marvellous of our writers. ‘Salt demonstrates why Bruce Pascoe’s voice is important to the country.’ —Kim Scott ‘A paradigm shift ... a wonderful expanse of thinking and storytelling ... In prose that is funny in one moment and devastating the next, Pascoe moves us from wry humour [to] the deep sadness that follows the wonder of discovering a history of richness and fullness deliberately obscured.’ —Marie Matteson, Readings
A collection of short stories by Australian writers
Written with gentle humour and a beautiful interpretation of landscape, this adventure story about Jack and his family is reminiscent of endless summers, azure seas and sandy white beaches. Jack, his dad Vince, sister Tanya, and mum Carla, escape to Seahorse Bay whenever they can. Idyllic days are spent exploring the waters of the bay, diving, fishing and cooking up feasts on the beach - and, for Jack, daydreaming of long-gone shipwrecks and forgotten treasure. Jack cannot believe his luck when he comes across a sunken boat not far off the coast. When he shows his father, they discover it is in pristine condition and decide to take on the challenge of salvaging it. But what is the story behind this mysterious boat? How long has it been in the bay? How did it get there? And who is the man on the cliff with the binoculars? When the boat is finally raised, the adventure begins...
Published in conjunction with an exhibition at the National Library, this is an illustrated insight into changing social traditions in New Zealand. There are over 100 pages of new photographs by Bruce Foster and historical photographs from the Alexander Turnbull Library. The second part is an 8,000-word essay by Lloyd Jones on the rituals and fantasies of Saturday. Jones is the author of 'Swimming to Australia' and 'Biografi'.

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