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The first book of its kind, Bushido, The Soul of Japan, first published in 1905, brings the rich ethics and traditions of the samurai to a Western audience. Never before had anyone explained the life of the samurai in English, nor had anyone traced how this code has shaped the character of the Japanese people. Nitobe explains all aspects of samurai life, from sword training to cultural education. History buffs and anyone interested in this unique culture will enjoy this thorough and engaging account of a warrior's code from a time long past. Japanese politician and author INAZO NITOBE (1862-1933) attended Sapporo Agricultural College, where he converted to Christianity. In 1884, he came to the United States to study at Johns Hopkins University and became a Quaker. He was a prolific writer, most remembered for writing about his native Japan for a Western audience.
"Bushido, the Soul of Japan" by Inazo Nitobe. Published by Good Press. Good Press publishes a wide range of titles that encompasses every genre. From well-known classics & literary fiction and non-fiction to forgotten−or yet undiscovered gems−of world literature, we issue the books that need to be read. Each Good Press edition has been meticulously edited and formatted to boost readability for all e-readers and devices. Our goal is to produce eBooks that are user-friendly and accessible to everyone in a high-quality digital format.
Inazo Nitobe lays out a beautiful and nostalgic picture of Japanese culture before it opened to Western Culture in 1853. The book allows a glimpse into the mythology and epic poetry of a bygone world. Bushido, the Soul of Japan argues that although the Bushido ethos is gone, it remains an integral part of Japanese identity.
Bushido is the code of moral principles which the knights were required or instructed to observe. It is not a written code; at best it consists of a few maxims handed down from mouth to mouth or coming from the pen of some well-known warrior or savant. More frequently it is a code unuttered and unwritten, possessing all the more the powerful sanction of veritable deed, and of a law written on the fleshly tablets of the heart. It was founded not on the creation of one brain, however able, or on the life of a single personage, however renowned. It was an organic growth of decades and centuries of military career. It, perhaps, fills the same position in the history of ethics that the English Constitution does in political history; yet it has had nothing to compare with the Magna Charta or the Habeas Corpus Act. True, early in the seventeenth century Military Statutes (Buké Hatto) were promulgated; but their thirteen short articles were taken up mostly with marriages, castles, leagues, etc., and didactic regulations were but meagerly touched upon. We cannot, therefore, point out any definite time and place and say, "Here is its fountain head." Only as it attains consciousness in the feudal age, its origin, in respect to time, may be identified with feudalism. But feudalism itself is woven of many threads, and Bushido shares its intricate nature. As in England the political institutions of feudalism may be said to date from the Norman Conquest, so we may say that in Japan its rise was simultaneous with the ascendancy of Yoritomo, late in the twelfth century. As, however, in England, we find the social elements of feudalism far back in the period previous to William the Conqueror, so, too, the germs of feudalism in Japan had been long existent before the period mentioned.
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The Samurai Series brings together three of the most important books dealing with the Samurai path and philosophy into one deluxe, illustrated hardcover volume. "The Book of Five Rings" was written by Miyamoto Musashi, a Samurai of legendary renown, about 1645. It is a masterpiece of simple exposition written by a master swordsman, who, near the end of his spectacular life, tried earnestly to explain the essentials of individual combat and the essence of being a Samurai. His book is widely considered to a cornerstone of the philosophy of "Bushido." "Hagakure - The Way of the Samurai," which means: "Hidden by Leaves," was composed from dialogs by the famous Samurai Yamamoto Tsunetomo, by a scribe, Tashiro Tsuramoto, about 1716 AD. It explains the major ideas and philosophy that are essential to the "way of the Samurai," by which is meant the "way of dying." It contains numerous tales of various Samurai and their deeds which illustrate their philosophy and practice. "Bushido - The Soul of Japan" by Inazo Nitobe was first published 1899. It is an extremely literate presentation by a Japanese intellectual who wished to present Japan and its fundamental philosophy in a way that could be understood by Westerners. It describes how the Shinto religion and Buddhism are the underpinnings of the essentially militaristic view of honor and life that are inherent in Bushido, the Samurai code. Excerpt from The Book of Five Rings. Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved. The Gaze in Strategy The gaze should be large and broad. This is the twofold gaze, "Perception and Sight." Perception is strong and sight, weak. In strategy, it is important to see distant things as if they were close, and to take a distanced view of close things. It is important in strategy to know the enemy's sword, yet not be distracted by insignificant movements of his sword. You must study this. The gaze is the same for single combat and for large-scale strategy. It is necessary in strategy to be able to look to both sides without moving the eyeballs. You cannot master this ability quickly. Learn what is written here; use this gaze in everyday life and do not vary it...
Honor: Samurai Philosophy of Life - The Essential Samurai Collection is comprised of three of the most influential books on the Samurai philosophy of honor and life. The Book of Five Rings by Miyamoto Musashi is a text on kenjutsu and the martial arts in general, written by the samurai warrior Miyamoto Musashi circa 1645. It is considered a classic treatise on military strategy, much like Sun Tzu's The Art of War and Chanakya's Arthashastra. There have been various translations made over the years, and it enjoys an audience considerably broader than only that of martial artists: for instance, some business leaders find its discussion of conflict and taking the advantage to be relevant to their work. The modern-day Hy h Niten Ichi-ry employs it as a manual of technique and philosophy. Hagakure: The Way of the Samurai is a practical and spiritual guide for a warrior, drawn from a collection of commentaries by the samurai Yamamoto Tsunetomo, former retainer to Nabeshima Mitsushige, the third ruler of what is now the Saga prefecture in Japan. Tsuramoto Tashiro compiled these commentaries from his conversations with Tsunetomo from 1709 to 1716; however, it was not published until many years after. Hagakure is also known as the The Book of the Samurai, Analects of Nabeshima or the Hagakure Analects. Bushido: The Soul of Japan by Inazo Nitobe is, along with the classic text Hagakure by Tsunetomo Yamamoto, a study of the way of the samurai. A best-seller in its day, it was read by many influential foreigners, among them President Theodore Roosevelt, President John F. Kennedy and Robert Baden-Powell. It may well have shaped Baden-Powell's ideas on the Boy Scout movement he founded."
Nitobe was a prolific writer. He published many scholarly books as well as books for general readers (see below). He also contributed hundreds of articles to popular magazines and newspapers. Nitobe, however, is perhaps most famous in the west for his work Bushido: The Soul of Japan (1900), which was one of the first major works on samurai ethics and Japanese culture written originally in English for Western readers (The book was subsequently translated into Japanese and many other languages). Although sometimes criticized as portraying the samurai in terms so Western as to take away some of their actual meaning, this book nonetheless was a pioneering work of its kind.
The Manchurian "Incident" of 1931 led to a Japanese occupation, the birth of Manchoukuo and the withdrawal of Japan from the League of Nations. At the time it seemed as if the army and navy were exerting a supreme influence. This volume points out that this influence is not new and that there are strong reasons for its existence and continuance. It shows how it is fostered by the peculiar political structure of the country, and how, though often unintelligible to Europeans, it may be understood and accounted for in the light of the historical and political background of Japan.
This graphic novel version of the cult classic Bushido brings the timeless secrets of the samurai to life. First published in the early 1900s, Bushido was the first book to introduce Westerners to the samurai ethos. Written by Inazo Nitobe, one of the foremost Japanese authors and educators of the time, it describes the characteristics and virtues that are associated with bushido—honor, courage, justice, loyalty, self-control—and explains the philosophy behind how samurai were educated and trained; the connection between the sword and the samurai; seppuku; and the position of women in samurai culture; among other themes. To this day, Bushido is considered a must-read for anyone who wants to understanding the soul of Japan and navigate their world with integrity and honor.
Thesis (M.A.) from the year 2010 in the subject English Language and Literature Studies - Literature, grade: 3,0, University of Würzburg (englische Literaturwissenschaft), language: English, abstract: Japanese-British writer Kazuo Ishiguro is not very fond of critics concentrating on Japanese elements in his works , however, his first short stories and the following two novels take place – even if, as it is the case with A Pale View of Hills, only partly– in Japan, making it hard not to concentrate on the writer ́s apparent preoccupation with his Japanese heritage. His third novel, featuring an English setting and characters – an old mansion, a butler, and his employer, may have been viewed as an attempt to break away from this line of interpretation on the one hand, on the other, however, it was the one work which first merited a mention of the similarities between the butler ́s philosophy of life and the samurai code of honour. To the author, though, his three novels, namely A Pale View of Hills, An Artist of the Floating World, and The Remains of the Day, are linked primarily by their characters, who all seem to be stuck in similar situations, having to face their past – in all three cases the past ultimately revolves around their choices before, during and in the immediate aftermath of the Second World War – and consequently struggle with their long-repressed feelings of regret and even shame... Table of Contents 1. Introduction 2. Samurai Ethics in the Novels of Kazuo Ishiguro 2.1. Samurai Ethics – An Overview 2.2. The Position of Woman – Ishiguro’s Female Characters 2.3. Suicide 2.4. The Duty of Loyalty 2.4.1. Filial Piety 2.4.2. Teacher-Student relationship 2.4.3. Loyalty to the Master 2.4.4. Serving a Higher Purpose 2.5. Self-Control 2.6. Ishiguro’s Imaginary Homeland(s) 3. Conclusion 4. Bibliography
This volume examines the development of the 'way of the samurai' (bushidō), which is popularly viewed as a defining element of the Japanese national character and even the 'soul of Japan' - to provide an overview of modern Japanese social, cultural, and political history.
A simple guide for using Japanese candlesticks correctly, and profitably Candlesticks have gotten a lot of attention lately, but few traders truly know how to use them wisely and profitably. Without the proper context, candlestick charting won't work. In this book, technical analysis expert Felipe Tudela shares candlestick creator Sokyu Honma's Great Market Cycle theory. With the Great Market Cycle, candlesticks reveal their powerful and simple logic and give traders the insight and context they need to use them successfully. Using these insights, readers will be able to trade each market phase in accordance with his or her own personal strategy. Felipe Tudela (Paris, France) is a researcher and specialist in technical analysis, as well as President of the Center of Financial Research in Paris.
If the financial crisis has taught us anything, it is that Americans save too little, spend too much, and borrow excessively. What can we learn from East Asian and European countries that have fostered enduring cultures of thrift over the past two centuries? Beyond Our Means tells for the first time how other nations aggressively encouraged their citizens to save by means of special savings institutions and savings campaigns. The U.S. government, meanwhile, promoted mass consumption and reliance on credit, culminating in the global financial meltdown. Many economists believe people save according to universally rational calculations, saving the most in their middle years as they plan for retirement, and saving the least in welfare states. In reality, Europeans save at high rates despite generous welfare programs and aging populations. Americans save little, despite weaker social safety nets and a younger population. Tracing the development of such behaviors across three continents from the nineteenth century to today, this book highlights the role of institutions and moral suasion in shaping habits of saving and spending. It shows how the encouragement of thrift was not a relic of indigenous traditions but a modern movement to confront rising consumption. Around the world, messages to save and spend wisely confronted citizens everywhere--in schools, magazines, and novels. At the same time, in America, businesses and government normalized practices of living beyond one's means. Transnational history at its most compelling, Beyond Our Means reveals why some nations save so much and others so little. Some images inside the book are unavailable due to digital copyright restrictions.

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