Download Free Buy The Horse A Guinness Book in PDF and EPUB Free Download. You can read online Buy The Horse A Guinness and write the review.

He was the perfect horse, it was said, "the horse God built." Most of us know the legend of Secretariat, the tall, handsome chestnut racehorse whose string of honors runs long and rich: the only two-year-old ever to win Horse of the Year, in 1972; winner in 1973 of the Triple Crown, his times in all three races still unsurpassed; featured on the cover of Time, Newsweek, and Sports Illustrated; the only horse listed on ESPN's top fifty athletes of the twentieth century (ahead of Mickey Mantle). His final race at Toronto's Woodbine Racetrack is a touchstone memory for horse lovers everywhere. Yet while Secretariat will be remembered forever, one man, Eddie "Shorty" Sweat, who was pivotal to the great horse's success, has been all but forgotten---until now. In The Horse God Built, bestselling equestrian writer Lawrence Scanlan has written a tribute to an exceptional man that is also a backroads journey to a corner of the racing world rarely visited. As a young black man growing up in South Carolina, Eddie Sweat struggled at several occupations before settling on the job he was born for---groom to North America's finest racehorses. As Secretariat's groom, loyal friend, and protector, Eddie understood the horse far better than anyone else. A wildly generous man who could read a horse with his eyes, he shared in little of the financial success or glamour of Secretariat's wins on the track, but won the heart of Big Red with his soft words and relentless devotion. In Scanlan's rich narrative, we get a groom's-eye view of the racing world and the vantage of a man who spent every possible moment with the horse he loved, yet who often basked in the horse's glory from the sidelines. More than anything else, The Horse God Built is a moving portrait of the powerful bond between human and horse.
This illustrated reference book contains up-to-date records for more than eighty sports and includes various men's and women's collegiate championships as well as professional and amateur records
Cover: The only flag that counted in the life of my father Patrick John Dunleavy was the American flag with its forty eight stars. The flag with the harp is not the British one under which my father may have grown up. Rather it is a flag design used at different times to express Irish nationalism. It was created in the United States by a group of Irish volunteers who joined the Mexican side in the U.S.-Mexican war from 1846 to 1848 as the Los San Patricios or Saint Patricks Battalion. The motto Erin Go Bragh underneath the harp means Ireland Forever. The current Irish tricolor flag was flown in the Easter Rising in 1916 and officially adopted in 1919 by the Republic during its War of Independence. Photographed by Niall Mackey, the flags are a framed gift from Nora Geraghty, purchased during a Harris Auction sale in Delgany, County Wicklow, Ireland, in the 1960s. Nora thought it belonged in my home nearby, Carriglea, in Greystones, County Wicklow, Ireland.
Albania is the least-known and least developed country in Europe. It has a long, rich and troubled past, characterised by unrest and isolationism. Today, very little is known of its people - beyond those who have emigrated to other countries in Europe - and its landscapes have remained virtually untravelled for centuries. Determined to discover the country behind the stereotypes and preconceptions, Robin Hanbury-Tenison and his wife Louella rode across Albania, from Thethi in the north to the border with Greece in the south. Following in the footsteps of Byron, Edward Lear and Edith Durham they crossed some of the most wild and arrestingly beautiful landscape in Europe. Through soaring mountain ranges and hidden valleys dotted with Illyrian, Roman and Byzantine ruins they lived simply; staying in the homes of communities untouched by the 21st century and in towns bursting with artistic creativity. They discovered an ancient land, proud and fiercely independent, struggling to emerge from the darkness of repression and poverty and from the shadows of its more popular neighbours. Land of Eagles is the story of a lyrical and dramatic journey, peppered with adventure and mishap, discovery and unexpected encounters. Adorned with the history, legends and literature of Albania and with the tales of past travellers, it is a luminous portrait of this mysterious and eccentric country, which has for too long been forgotten by Europe.
The history of Guinness, one of the world’s most famous brands, reveals the noble heights and generosity of a great family and an innovative business. It began in Ireland in the mid 1700s. The water in Ireland, indeed throughout Europe, was famously undrinkable, and the gin and whiskey that took its place devastated civil society. It was a disease ridden, starvation-plagued, alcoholic age, and Christians like Arthur Guinness—as well as monks and even evangelical churches—brewed beer that provided a healthier alternative to the poisonous waters and liquors of the times. This is where the Guinness tale began. Now, 250 years and over 150 countries later, Guinness is a global brand, one of the most consumed beverages in the world. The tale that unfolds during those two and a half centuries has power to thrill audiences today: the generational drama, business adventure, industrial and social reforms, deep-felt faith, and the noble beer itself. "Frothy, delicious, intoxicating and nutritious! No, I'm not talking about Guinness Stout—I'm talking about Stephen Mansfield's fabulous new book...The amazing and true story of how the Guinness family used its wealth and influence to touch millions is an absolute inspiration." — Eric Metaxas, New York Times best-selling author "It's a rare brew that takes faith, philanthropy and the frothy head of freshly-poured Guinness and combines them into such an inspiriting narrative. Cheers to brewmaster Stephen Mansfield! And cheers to you, the reader! You're in for a treat." — R. Emmett Tyrrell Jr., Founder and editor-in-chief of The American Spectator
Al Byrne started working for Guinness at the age of 14, and continued to work for the company until her retired 40 years later. In this book, Al recalls a working life in the Guinness brewery.
Now in Paperback! Straight from the Horse's Mouth provides a fascinating, first-hand account of a unique filmmaker, who began his career as assistant cameraman on Hitchcock's first talkie, Blackmail, and went on to direct Maggie Smith, Judy Garland, Walter Matthau, and many other prominent performers. The book includes tales of the on-and-off-the-set antics of comedian George Formby, and original accounts of his experiences working with Noel Coward and David Lean. This is not simply an autobiography, but rather a history of British cinema from the 1920s through the 1960s, and Hollywood cinema from the 1960s through the present.
Presents record-breaking achievements of pets, particularly the warm-blooded varieties.
Covering the ancient world to the space age, this book recounts the stories of famous explorers and of many less well-known expeditions. Background information is provided on each phase of exploration, the equipment and technology available and the people and places discovered.
Updates world and American records and reports new categories established during the year.

Best Books