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Everyone's talking about calcium these days. And with good reason. Because whether you're pregnant or nursing, lactose-intolerant, allergic to dairy, concerned about preventing osteoporosis as you get older, or just want to eat healthier, the fact is that you need to ensure an adequate level of calcium to maintain strong, healthy bones.Now anyone can get the calcium they need from healthful, plant-based foods. Here you'll find over 120 calcium-rich recipes for a wide range of vegetarian dishes -- from appetizers to main courses to deserts -- that will appeal to every member of the family.
Since 1941, Recommended Dietary Allowances (RDAs) has been recognized as the most authoritative source of information on nutrient levels for healthy people. Since publication of the 10th edition in 1989, there has been rising awareness of the impact of nutrition on chronic disease. In light of new research findings and a growing public focus on nutrition and health, the expert panel responsible for formulation RDAs reviewed and expanded its approach--the result: Dietary Reference Intakes. This new series of references greatly extends the scope and application of previous nutrient guidelines. For each nutrient the book presents what is known about how the nutrient functions in the human body, what the best method is to determine its requirements, which factors (caffeine or exercise, for example) may affect how it works, and how the nutrient may be related to chronic disease. The first volume of Dietary Reference Intakes includes calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, vitamin D, and fluoride. The second book in the series presents information about thiamin, riboflavin, niacin, vitamin B6, folate, vitamin B12, pantothenic acid, biotin, and choline. Based on analysis of nutrient metabolism in humans and data on intakes in the U.S. population, the committee recommends intakes for each age group--from the first days of life through childhood, sexual maturity, midlife, and the later years. Recommendations for pregnancy and lactation also are made, and the book identifies when intake of a nutrient may be too much. Representing a new paradigm for the nutrition community, Dietary Reference Intakes encompasses: Estimated Average Requirements (EARs). These are used to set Recommended Dietary Allowances. Recommended Dietary Allowances (RDAs). Intakes that meet the RDA are likely to meet the nutrient requirement of nearly all individuals in a life-stage and gender group. Adequate Intakes (AIs). These are used instead of RDAs when an EAR cannot be calculated. Both the RDA and the AI may be used as goals for individual intake. Tolerable Upper Intake Levels (ULs). Intakes below the UL are unlikely to pose risks of adverse health effects in healthy people. This new framework encompasses both essential nutrients and other food components thought to pay a role in health, such as dietary fiber. It incorporates functional endpoints and examines the relationship between dose and response in determining adequacy and the hazards of excess intake for each nutrient.
It has been estimated that over 7.5% of the U.S. population lives dairy-free, yet so few resources cater to this expansive and diverse group. To aid this niche, Alisa Fleming founded the informational website GoDairyFree.org in 2004, and produced the limited edition guidebook Dairy Free Made Easy in 2006, which quickly sold out. Back by popular demand, Alisa has updated and expanded her guide to address additional FAQs and to include an expansive cookbook section. Within this complete dairy-free living resource, you will discover ... Over 225 Delicious Dairy-Free Recipes with numerous options to satisfy dairy cravings, while focusing on naturally rich and delicious whole foods.A Comprehensive Guide to Dairy Substitutes which explains how to purchase, use, and prepare alternatives for butter, cheese, cream, milk, and much more, from scratch.Grocery Shopping Information from suspect ingredients lists and label-reading assistance to food suggestions and money-saving tips.A Detailed Calcium Chapter to identify calcium-rich foods and supplements and understand other factors involved in building and maintaining strong bones.An In-Depth Health Section that explains dairy, details the signs and symptoms of various dairy-related illnesses, and thoroughly addresses protein, fat, and nutrient issues in the dairy-free transition.Everyday Living Tips with suggestions for skincare, supplements, store-bought foods, restaurant dining, travel, celebrations, and other social situations.Infant Milk Allergy Checklists that go into detail on signs, symptoms, and solutions for babies with milk allergies or intolerances.Multiple Food Allergy and Vegan-Friendly Resources including a recipe index to quickly reference which recipes are vegan and which are free from soy, eggs, wheat, gluten, peanuts, and/or tree nuts.
DIVWhile 4% of the population suffers from diagnosed lactose intolerance, it is estimated that a staggering 50 million Americans suffer from some degree of dairy intolerance/allergy. Moreover, recent research has linked milk protein (casein) to cancer and autoimmune illnesses and found evidence that our bodies quit making the enzymes necessary to digest milk as we age--thus setting up those who consume a dairy-rich diet for IBS, allergies and other autoimmune and digestive difficulties. Dairy has become the "new gluten"--something that people are realizing needs to be minimized in our diet whether they have a formally diagnosed allergy or not. /divDIV /divDIVThe Dairy-Free Kitchen contains 100 delicious recipes for the foods you love without the dairy. It also provides you with a wealth of information on weeding out hidden dairy in everyday foods and getting adequate levels of calcium and minerals from a dairy-free diet./divDIV /divDIVGoing dairy-free isn’t as complicated as you think. You can do it! The Dairy-Free Kitchen will help./divDIV /div
If ONE simple change could resolve most of your symptoms and prevent a host of illnesses, wouldn't you want to try it? Go Dairy Free shows you how! There are plenty of reasons to go dairy free. Maybe you are confronting allergies or lactose intolerance. Maybe you are dealing with acne, digestive issues, sinus troubles, or eczema—all proven to be associated with dairy consumption. Maybe you're looking for longer-term disease prevention, weight loss, or for help transitioning to a plant-based diet. Whatever your reason, Go Dairy Free is the essential arsenal of information you need to change your diet. This complete guide and cookbook will be your vital companion to understand dairy, how it affects you, and how you can eliminate it from your life and improve your health—without feeling like you're sacrificing a thing. Inside: More than 250 delicious dairy-free recipes focusing on naturally rich and delicious whole foods, with numerous options to satisfy those dairy cravings A comprehensive guide to dairy substitutes explaining how to purchase, use, and make your own alternatives for butter, cheese, cream, milk, and much more Must-have grocery shopping information, from sussing out suspect ingredients and label-reading assistance to money-saving tips A detailed chapter on calcium to identify naturally mineral-rich foods beyond dairy, the best supplements, and other keys to bone health An in-depth health section outlining the signs and symptoms of dairy-related illnesses and addressing questions around protein, fat, and other nutrients in the dairy-free transition Everyday living tips with suggestions for restaurant dining, travel, celebrations, and other social situations Infant milk allergy checklists that describe indicators and solutions for babies and young children with milk allergies or intolerances Food allergy- and vegan-friendly resources, including recipe indexes to quickly find gluten-free and other top food allergy-friendly options and fully tested plant-based options for every recipe

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