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(Easy Piano Songbook). Easy solo arrangements of Carter Burwell's compositions for this hit film, including "Bella's Lullaby" and ten more: Dinner with His Family * Edward at Her Bed * I Dreamt of Edward * I Would Be the Meal * In Place of Someone You Love * The Lion Fell in Love with the Lamb * Phascination Phase * Stuck Here like Mom * Tracking * Who Are They? Includes full-color photos from the film!
(Big Note Songbook). Big-note arrangements of Carter Burwell's compositions for this hit film, including "Bella's Lullaby" and ten more: Dinner with His Family * Edward at Her Bed * I Dreamt of Edward * I Would Be the Meal * In Place of Someone You Love * The Lion Fell in Love with the Lamb * Phascination Phase * Stuck Here like Mom * Tracking * Who Are They? Includes fabulous full-color photos from the film!
Lorena Walsh offers an enlightening history of plantation management in the Chesapeake colonies of Virginia and Maryland, ranging from the founding of Jamestown to the close of the Seven Years' War and the end of the "Golden Age" of colonial Chesapeake agriculture. Walsh focuses on the operation of more than thirty individual plantations and on the decisions that large planters made about how they would run their farms. She argues that, in the mid-seventeenth century, Chesapeake planter elites deliberately chose to embrace slavery. Prior to 1763 the primary reason for large planters' debt was their purchase of capital assets--especially slaves--early in their careers. In the later stages of their careers, chronic indebtedness was rare. Walsh's narrative incorporates stories about the planters themselves, including family dynamics and relationships with enslaved workers. Accounts of personal and family fortunes among the privileged minority and the less well documented accounts of the suffering, resistance, and occasional minor victories of the enslaved workers add a personal dimension to more concrete measures of planter success or failure.
Shows and describes the historical background of fourteen colonial plantations
The origins of Clarke County, Virginia go back more than 250 years to the men and women who first settled in Shenandoah Valley and left their imprint upon the land. When, in the early 1830s, the people in one portion of old Frederick County moved to establish their own county, they were seeking to maintain the way of life they had inherited from this earlier generation. At the same time, they were acting in concert with contemporary forces that had a statewide, and in some ways national, significance. The origins of Clarke County--how it came to be, and why--are examined here for the first time. Warren R. Hofstra not only tells the story of the people who made Clarke County a separate place but also puts the movement for its formation in the context of Virginia and U.S. politics. It is a story fascinating in detail and rich in implication, for the issues that strained old Frederick to the breaking point--local control vs. an expanded federal government, conformity vs. pluralism, agrarian values vs. commercial pursuits--are still featured in the political debates today both regionally and nationally.
The entire town of Williamsburg, the 18th-century capital of Colonial Virginia, has been meticulously restored and preserved as a living museum. Williamsburg, named in honor of King William III, was designed to reflect the beliefs of the time that stated traditional cities should be centers of government, learning, and religion.
In Gardens and Gardening in the Chesapeake, Barbara Wells Sarudy recovers this lost world using a remarkable variety of sources - historic maps, travelers' accounts, diaries, paintings (some on the back of Baltimore painted chairs), account ledgers, catalogues, and newspaper advertisements. She offers an engaging account of the region's earliest gardens, introducing us to the people who designed and tended these often elaborate landscapes and explaining the forces and finances behind their creation. From the favorite books of early gardeners to the republican balance between table and ornamental gardens, Sarudy includes details that give us an understanding of Chesapeake gardening from settlement through the early national period.
Lewis Burwell immigrated from England to Gloucester County, Virginia about 1640 and died in 1658. Includes most descendants living in Virginia.
John Carter (1613-1669) emigrated from England to Corotoman, Lancaster County, Virginia in 1635; he had five wives and six children. His son, Robert Carter (1663-1732), married (1) Judith Armistead and (2) widow Betty (Landon) Willis. Descendants lived in Virginia, Washington, D.C., Pennsylvania, Maryland, New York, New Jersey, Tennessee, Alabama and elsewhere.

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