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Provides a clear and succinct introduction to teaching the language arts to elementary students Key Features Focuses on integrating the six language arts—reading, writing, listening, speaking, viewing, and visually representing—with other subject areas Provides guidance on differentiating instruction to bring out the best in the rapidly growing number of students with special needs and English language learners in the regular classroom Includes a detailed lesson plan in each chapter along with instructional activities and techniques to integrate the language arts across all the subjects in the elementary curriculum Accompanied by High-Quality Ancillaries! Student Resource CD: Bundled with the book, this CD includes video clips and discussion questions that correlate with important chapter concepts. Web-based student study site This interactive study site provides practice tests, flashcards, chapter summaries, links to NCTE/IRA and state-specific Language Arts standards, and much more. Instructor Resources on CD: Available by contacting SAGE Customer Care at 1-800-818-SAGE (7243), this CD for instructors offers resources such as lecture outlines, PowerPoint slides, a test bank, and sample syllabi for semester and quarter courses. Intended Audience This book is intended for undergraduate and graduate courses in elementary language arts methods, which teaches pre-service teachers and licensure/certification candidates specifically how to teach their students the basics of the six language arts – reading, writing, listening, speaking, viewing, and visually representing.
Using children’s and young adult literature is a great way to enhance a variety of college classes in fields as varied as biology, computer game development, political science and history. This collection of new essays by educators from a number of disciplines describes how to use such works as Where the Wild Things Are, The Tale of Peter Rabbit, Swamp Thing, Percy Jackson, and Harry Potter to introduce complex concepts and spark interest in difficult subjects. The contributors describe innovative teaching strategies using dystopian fiction, graphic narratives, fairy tales and mythology. Often overlooked or dismissed by teachers, children’s literature can support student learning by raising levels of academic rigor, creativity and critical thinking.
Four-hundred-twenty-five books are reviewed in this superb collection. A Second Look, Native Americans in Childrens Books gives a thorough examination of the books as a guide for parents, teachers, librarians, and administrators interested in books for children. Anyone involved in selecting books will find this guide useful in working through the maze of available materials. Andie Peterson, one of the few women to be awarded an Eagle Feather, has provided a meaningful criteria to help in judging books. She outlines ways for objectively studying books to draw conclusions as to the suitability for the reader. She writes candidly about books filled with stereotypes, hurtful images, and damaging text and illustrations. She writes eloquent, glowing reviews of the books that are real treasures. She writes: On a daily basis, children must face the hidden curriculum that lets them know where they fit in, whether they can achieve their goals, whether they even dare to dream. An overwhelming part of that hidden curriculum begins with books that are more narrative and illustrations; they are books that carry a message of politics and values. Andie advises that in selecting Native American books, the non-Native child must be considered, also. She counsels that hurtful books set in motion attitudes of prejudice that persist for years. She states that she has reviewed books with older copyrights because they are still on the shelves in libraries and available via the Internet. She says reading the older books helps to understand how adults have formed ideas about Native people. She says: After all, if its in a book in the library, people believe it to be true. Its time to disturb the peace and end the ritual of damage. A Second Look, Native Americans in Childrens Books By Andie Peterson
A pioneering history of the experiences of children during Russia's most disrupted century How a country views its children reveals a great deal about that country. This landmark history of childhood in twentieth-century Russia presents an enthralling and detailed picture of a society where childhood was celebrated everywhere but children's real needs were often neglected by the state. Catriona Kelly, one of the foremost cultural historians of modern Russia, explores every aspect of children's lives, including the stresses and joys of ordinary family life, friendships, sports and games, first love, clothing, and schools. She examines the experiences of children in institutions, orphanages, and Stalin's camps, as well as the impact on their lives of such historical tragedies as revolution, civil and world war, and political purges. Based on unprecedented research in archives, hundreds of interviews, and the study of a huge range of newspapers, books, and pamphlets, the book has an immediacy which is startling. Over 100 illustrations sharpen the focus still more. Kelly weaves together information about the relationships between children and adults, prevailing ideas about childhood, and the actual experiences of children to create an unforgettable account of the intimate workings of Russian and Soviet society.
Originally published: Minneapolis, Minn.: CompCare Publishers, 1984.
The all new essays in this book discuss Black cultural retellings of traditional, European fairy tales. The representation of Black protagonists in such tales helps to shape children's ideas about themselves and the world beyond their limited experiences. Allowing them to see themselves in traditional tales strengthens connections with the world and can ignite a will to read books representing diverse ethnic and cultural characters. Also discussed is the need for a multicultural text set which includes the multiplicity of cultures within the Black Diaspora.The tales referenced in the text are rich and diverse in perspective, illuminating stories such as Aesop's fables, Cinderella, Rapunzel and Ananse. Readers will see that stories from Black perspectives adhere to the dictates of traditional literary conventions while steeped in literary traditions that can be traced back to Africa or the diaspora.

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