Download Free Chinese Negotiating Style Book in PDF and EPUB Free Download. You can read online Chinese Negotiating Style and write the review.

This book adds a valuable `Chinese voice' to the current Western-dominated forum on Chinese business negotiating style. The book provides the reader with an in-depth socio-cultural understanding of Chinese negotiating behaviour and tactics in the context of Sino-Western business negotiation. It addresses this fascinating and complex subject by looking systematically at various components of Chinese business culture which range from contemporary Chinese politics to ancient Chinese philosophies and military stratagems.
How precisely do the Chinese negotiate contracts and other agreements? Do they follow conventions similar to those of European negotiators? To the Japanese? Is there a pattern or style to their negotiations? These are the types of issues examined and resolved in Pye's guide. The volume is based on extensive interviews with Americans and Japanese who have had considerable first-hand experience negotiating with the Chinese, and an effort has been made to highlight the areas in which there has been the greatest amount of confusion and misunderstanding for American business people. Pye examines each step in the traditionally long negotiating process, from the first contacts to the responses after agreements have been reached. With an emphasis on cultural considerations and troubleshooting techniques, Pye gives solid, practical advice for business firms and individual negotiators. While the emphasis is on practical business negotiations, anyone concerned with Chinese culture will find much to ponder in this book.
This study analyzes Chinese commercial negotiating practices for two reasons. The first is to minimize future misunderstandings in such activities, and the second is to provide guidance for government-to-government negotiations. The research procedure used involved interviews with American businessmen and bankers with extensive experience in the China trade, and--in order to control for American cultural factors--interviews with comparable Japanese bankers and businessmen. What was learned from the experiences of businessmen is to value in government-to-government negotiations, even though there are substantial differences between commercial and diplomatic relationships. At present both Beijing and Washington seek a more cooperative and complementary relationship. (Author).
Provides a profile of each national negotiating style for China, the Soviet Union, Japan, France, Egypt and Mexico. Reviews each nation's historical and institutional setting, the characteristics of its political culture, the style of the negotiators themselves, and national strategies and tactics. Suggests bargaining guidelines for U.S. negotiators.
Chinese Foreign Policy offers an unprecedented survey of China's foreign relations since 1949. The contributors include leading historians, economists, and political scientists in the field of Chinese studies, as well as noteworthy international relations specialists. The principal purposes of the volume are to assess the variety of sources that give shape to Chinese foreign policy, and to trace four decades of Chinese interaction with the world. Individual chapters include consideration of the historical, perceptual, economic, and political sources of Chinese foreign policy; how the international strategic and technological systems impact on China and vice versa; China's evolving relations with the United States, the former Soviet Union, Europe, Africa, the Middle East, and Asia since the Chinese Communist Party came to power; patterns in China's co-operative and conflictual behaviour; how China negotiates; China's role in the international economy; and the relationship between international relations theory and the study of Chinese foreign policy. Studies of these subjects are retrospective, but they consider various scenarios for the future evolution of China's relations with the world community. Contributors: Wendy Frieman, Steven M. Goldstein, Carol Lee Hamrin, Harry Harding, Lillian Craig Harris, Harold C. Hinton, Samuel S. Kim, Wiliam C. Kirby, Paul H. Kreisberg, Steven I. Levine, Barry Naughton, James N. Rosenau, Madelyn C. Ross, Philip Snow, WilliamT. Tow, Wang Jisi, Allen S. Whiting, Michael B. Yahuda, and the editors.
After two decades of hostile confrontation, China and the United States initiated negotiations in the early 1970s to normalize relations. Senior officials of the Nixon, Ford, Carter, and Reagan administrations had little experience dealing with the Chinese, but they soon learned that their counterparts from the People s Republic were skilled negotiators.This study of Chinese negotiating behavior explores the ways senior officials of the PRC Mao Zedong, Zhou Enlai, Deng Xiaoping, and others managed these high-level political negotiations with their new American old friends. It follows the negotiating process step by step, and concludes with guidelines for dealing with Chinese officials.Originally written for the RAND Corporation, this study was classified because it drew on the official negotiating record. It was subsequently declassified, and RAND published the study in 1995. For this edition, Solomon has added a new introduction, and Chas Freeman has written an interpretive essay describing the ways in which Chinese negotiating behavior has, and has not, changed since the original study. The bibiliography has been updated as well."

Best Books