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The church cannot overcome the world without declaring boldly the dangerous idea at the core of its beliefs. This Mini Book focuses on Christianity's most dangerous idea, why it is so dangerous, and what Christians need to do in relation to this idea.
Today many in Hollywood and the media have declared open warfare on the family, education, and Christianity in general. Intellectuals have labeled religion, particularly Christianity, as mere wish fulfillment or a virus of the mind, something to be eradicated at all costs. In Christianity's Dangerous Idea, Jonas Alexis picks up where he left off in his previous books and continues to examine the ideological fallacies that have been fabricated in order to attack Christianity--and the people who promote those fallacies. This latest book is a tour de force of rigorous logic and testable evidence for the Christian worldview from history, science, experience, common sense, and final destiny. More importantly, Alexis subjects the rivals of Christianity to the same rigorous testing. Christianity's Dangerous Idea clearly demonstrates the destructive nature of popular atheistic and anti-Christian philosophies, spread throughout Western culture by such famous people as Friedrich Nietzsche, Sigmund Freud, Carl Jung, David Cronenberg, Steven Spielberg, Alan Moore, William S. Burroughs, Philip K. Dick, Bruce Lee, Ayn Rand, Bart D. Ehrman, Richard Dawkins, and many more. In a scholarly yet readable fashion, Alexis shows that what the ancient Greeks often referred to as "the cult of Dionysus" has become mainstream in our modern age.
A New Interpretation of Protestantism and Its Impact on the World The radical idea that individuals could interpret the Bible for themselves spawned a revolution that is still being played out on the world stage today. This innovation lies at the heart of Protestantism's remarkable instability and adaptability. World-renowned scholar Alister McGrath sheds new light on the fascinating figures and movements that continue to inspire debate and division across the full spectrum of Protestant churches and communities worldwide.
Ideas have consequences, sometimes far-reaching and world-changing. The Christian faith contains many volatile truths that challenged--and continue to challenge--the cultural and religious status quo of the world. None of these have been so world-changing as the assertion that Christ was raised from the dead. In a world where Christian belief and practice are increasingly under fire, this short ebook will give you the confidence to impact the world for Christ--for good
Who ought to hold claim to the more dangerous idea--Charles Darwin or C. S. Lewis? Daniel Dennett argued for Darwin in Darwin's Dangerous Idea (Touchstone Books, 1996). In this book Victor Reppert champions C. S. Lewis. Darwinists attempt to use science to show that our world and its inhabitants can be fully explained as the product of a mindless, purposeless system of physics and chemistry. But Lewis claimed in his argument from reason that if such materialism or naturalism were true then scientific reasoning itself could not be trusted. Victor Reppert believes that Lewis's arguments have been too often dismissed. In C. S. Lewis's Dangerous Idea Reppert offers careful, able development of Lewis's thought and demonstrates that the basic thrust of Lewis's argument from reason can bear up under the weight of the most serious philosophical attacks. Charging dismissive critics, Christian and not, with ad hominem arguments, Reppert also revisits the debate and subsequent interaction between Lewis and the philosopher Elizabeth Anscombe. And addressing those who might be afflicted with philosophical snobbery, Reppert demonstrates that Lewis's powerful philosophical instincts perhaps ought to place him among those other thinkers who, by contemporary standards, were also amateurs: Socrates, Plato, Aristotle, Aquinas, Descartes, Spinoza, Locke and Hume. But even more than this, Reppert's work exemplifies the truth that the greatness of Lewis's mind is best measured, not by his ability to do our thinking for us, but by his capacity to provide sound direction for taking our own thought further up and further in.
This new collection of essays edited by Kyle Strobel and Jamin Goggin offers an evangelical hermeneutic for reading the Christian spiritual classics. Addressing the why, what and how of reading these texts, these essays challenge us to find our own questions deepened by the church's long history of spiritual reflection.
Traditional understandings of the genesis of the separation of church and state rest on assumptions about "Enlightenment" and the republican ethos of citizenship. In The Religious Roots of the First Amendment, Nicholas P. Miller does not seek to dislodge that interpretation but to augment and enrich it by recovering its cultural and discursive religious contexts--specifically the discourse of Protestant dissent. He argues that commitments by certain dissenting Protestants to the right of private judgment in matters of Biblical interpretation, an outgrowth of the doctrine of the priesthood of all believers, helped promote religious disestablishment in the early modern West. This movement climaxed in the disestablishment of religion in the early American colonies and nation. Miller identifies a continuous strand of this religious thought from the Protestant Reformation, across Europe, through the English Reformation, Civil War, and Restoration, into the American colonies. He examines seven key thinkers who played a major role in the development of this religious trajectory as it came to fruition in American political and legal history: William Penn, John Locke, Elisha Williams, Isaac Backus, William Livingston, John Witherspoon, and James Madison. Miller shows that the separation of church and state can be read, most persuasively, as the triumph of a particular strand of Protestant nonconformity-that which stretched back to the Puritan separatist and the Restoration sects, rather than to those, like Presbyterians, who sought to replace the "wrong" church establishment with their own, "right" one. The Religious Roots of the First Amendment contributes powerfully to the current trend among some historians to rescue the eighteenth-century clergymen and religious controversialists from the enormous condescension of posterity.

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