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In Colonial Spirits, Steven Grasse presents a historical manifesto on drinking, including 50 colonial era– inspired cocktail recipes. The book features a rousing timeline of colonial imbibing and a cultural overview of a dizzying number of drinks: beer, rum and punch; temperance drinks; liqueurs and cordials; medicinal beverages; cider; wine, whiskey, and bourbon—all peppered with liquored-up adages from our founding fathers. There is also expert guidance on DIY methods for home brewing. Imbibe your way through each chapter, with recipes like the Philadelphia Fish House Punch (a crowd pleaser!) and Snakebites (drink alone!). Hot beer cocktails and rattle skulls have never been so completely irresistible.
A complete guide to home uses for neutral spirits, from infusions and tinctures to cocktails and cleaning solutions. A bottle of rectified alcohol, like The Good Reverend’s Universal Spirit from Tamworth Distilling, is a bottle of possibilities. In these pages, you’ll discover over 100 recipes for infusions, tinctures, cocktails, cordials, elixirs, punches, and even household cleaners. This handbook will teach you to replicate famous liqueurs and classic cocktails, and help you prepare perfect garnishes and celebratory toasts. With step-by-step instructions and photos, you’ll learn processes culinary, scientific, and alchemical to improve everything from your parties to your health. You’ll learn the processes of osmosis and dissolution that create the perfect infusions. You’ll be given the secrets to prep for guests lists of 1 or 100. You’ll be guided through pairing your alcoholic creations with the rhythms of nature. Yes, with a bottle of purified spirits, you’ll be able to purify your own human spirit. These recipes explain not just the flavor benefits of their ingredients, but also the spiritual and supernatural. Discover the meanings of herbs, the ratio of the Fibonacci sequence, and the effects of moon phases, among so much more. Come for the drinks, but stay for the magic.
Revive your inner pilgrim and master the art of colonial cooking with sixty recipes celebrating America's earliest days! From their voyage on the Mayflower to the days of the American Revolution, early American settlers struggled to survive in the New World. Join us as we travel through time and discover how our forefathers fed their families and grew a nation, from eating nuts and berries to preparing fantastic feasts of seafood and venison, and learn how you can cook like them, too! With gorgeous and whimsical hand-drawn illustrations from beginning to end, A Thyme to Discover, spanning the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, is an illustrated historical cookbook for foodies, history buffs, and Americans alike. Cohen and Graves reimagine old original colonial recipes from pilgrims, presidents, and Native Americans, and modify them to suit modern palates and tastes. Arranged chronologically as the English settlers cooked and ate their way into becoming Americans, these deliciously historical recipes include: The First Thanksgiving, 1621: Venison over Wild Rice Cakes and Pumpkin Pudding with Rum Sauce Alexander Hamilton's Beef Stew with Apple Brandy and Abraham Lincoln's Chicken Fricasee Rhode Island's Bacon-Kissed Clam Cakes and Massachusett's Chowdahhhhh Forefather's Day, 1749: Sufferin' Succcotash with Buttered Lobster Jim Beam's Bourbon Oatmeal Raisin Cookies And many more! Including a Tipsy Timeline of New World alcoholic beverages, the menus of the oldest taverns in America, and other bite-sized tidbits to satiate your curiosity and hunger, A Thyme to Discover revives forgotten culinary traditions and keeps them alive, on your own dinner table.
Indian peoples made some four hundred treaties with the United States between the American Revolution and 1871, when Congress prohibited them. They signed nine treaties with the Confederacy, as well as countless others over the centuries with Spain, France, Britain, Mexico, the Republic of Texas, Canada, and even Russia, not to mention individual colonies and states. In retrospect, the treaties seem like well-ordered steps on the path of dispossession and empire. The reality was far more complicated. In Pen and Ink Witchcraft, eminent Native American historian Colin G. Calloway narrates the history of diplomacy between North American Indians and their imperial adversaries, particularly the United States. Treaties were cultural encounters and human dramas, each with its cast of characters and conflicting agendas. Many treaties, he notes, involved not land, but trade, friendship, and the resolution of disputes. Far from all being one-sided, they were negotiated on the Indians' cultural and geographical terrain. When the Mohawks welcomed Dutch traders in the early 1600s, they sealed a treaty of friendship with a wampum belt with parallel rows of purple beads, representing the parties traveling side-by-side, as equals, on the same river. But the American republic increasingly turned treaty-making into a tool of encroachment on Indian territory. Calloway traces this process by focusing on the treaties of Fort Stanwix (1768), New Echota (1835), and Medicine Lodge (1867), in addition to such events as the Peace of Montreal in 1701 and the treaties of Fort Laramie (1851 and 1868). His analysis demonstrates that native leaders were hardly dupes. The records of negotiations, he writes, show that "Indians frequently matched their colonizing counterparts in diplomatic savvy and tried, literally, to hold their ground." Each treaty has its own story, Calloway writes, but together they tell a rich and complicated tale of moments in American history when civilizations collided.

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