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"Conflict across Cultures is written by a new generation of conflict resolution scholars from four parts of the world: Canada, South Africa, Japan and the US. They describe processes and help build the skills necessary for successful conflict resolution. Here is a new framework for understanding others-a map for making progress through differences that can otherwise overwhelm us. Conflict across Cultures offers hope in countering the view that differences must divide us. Book jacket."--Jacket.
Believing not only that conflict is inevitable in human life but that it is essential and can be quite constructive, Augsburger proposes a shift to an "international" approach in resolving conflict. Augsburger focuses on interpersonal and group conflicts and provides a comparison of conflict patterns within and among various cultures.
Since the early 1980s John Paul Lederach has traveled worldwide as a mediation trainer and conflict resolution consultant. Currently the director of the International Conciliation Committee, he has worked with governments, justice departments, youth programs, and other groups in Latin America, the Philippines, Cambodia, as well as Asia and Africa. Lederach blends a special training method in mediation with a tradition derived from his work in development. Throughout the book, he uses anecdote and pertinent experiences to demonstrate his resolution techniques. With an emphasis on the exchange involved in negotiation, Lederach conveys the key to successful conflict resolution: understanding how to guide disputants, transform their conflicts, and launch a process that empowers them.
Communicating Across Cultures is an innovative short course for learners of business English who want to function effectively in an international environment by developing their intercultural skills in English. Drawing on inspirational advice from leading figures in the world of cross-cultural communication, Communicating Across Cultures covers all types of oral and written communication, from meetings to negotiations, telephone calls to emails, and deals with situations ranging from working in international teams to managing conflict. Students are invited to analyse their own intercultural competence and helped to develop a personal action plan for further use beyond the classroom. The Student's Book comes with an audio CD that contains authentic interviews with people from the world of business and extracts from meetings that exemplify the communication strategies presented.
ACE-ing business through intercultural conflict resolution Questioning others' professionalism is an immediate negative reaction that many international executives have when facing workplace behavior which is culturally different from theirs. 'Professionalism' becomes the alibi for ethnocentrism which in turn jeopardizes relationships at work and reduces chances of success in the ever-growing multicultural business world. Such phenomenon may help explain why 70% of Merger and Acquisitions that fail are due to cultural differences, whether these may be corporate or national. According to another research, 60 to 80% of all difficulties in organizations stem from conflicts between employees. These difficulties increase when cultures collide. This book goes beyond individual views of "professionalism" to discuss the complex intercultural conflict phenomenon at work and propose practical ways to resolve it effectively. The distillation of our research enabled us to unveil a framework for intercultural conflict resolution called ACE, which consists of three parts: i) Attending to the emotions; ii) Contextualizing the conflict; iii) Exploring conflict resolutions.
"Description: This highly regarded text--now revised and expanded with 50% new material--helps students and professionals mindfully build their knowledge and competencies for effective intercultural communication on any setting. The authors' comprehensive, updated theoretical framework (integrative identity negotiation theory) reveals how both verbal and nonverbal communication are affected by multilayered facets of identity. Written in a candid, conversational style, the book is rich with engaging examples illustrating cultural conflicts and misunderstandings that arise in workplace, educational, interpersonal, and community contexts. Readers learn how to transform polarized conversations into successful intercultural engagements by combining culture-specific knowledge with mindful listening and communication skills. Key Words: intercultural communication, cross-cultural communication, human communication, communication skills, cultural competence, ethnic relations, ethnic studies, multicultural counseling, international business relations, cultural diversity, cross-cultural psychology, ethnography, mindful communication, mindfulness, intergroup communication, integrative identity negotiation theory, acculturation, adjustment, immigration, immigrants, listening skills, textbooks, texts, college classes, college courses, college students, undergraduates, graduates, foreign students, refugees, social psychology, sociolingustics, international competence"--
From high-level business negotiations to casual conversations among friends, every interpersonal interaction is shaped by cultural norms and expectations. Seldom is this more clearly brought to light than in encounters between people from different cultural backgrounds, when dissimilar communication practices may lead to frustration and misunderstanding. This thought-provoking text presents a new framework for understanding the impact of culture on communication and for helping students build intercultural communication competence. With illustrative examples from around the globe, the book shows that verbal and nonverbal communication involves much more than transmitting a particular message--it also reflects each participant's self-image, group identifications and values, and privacy and relational needs. Readers learn to move effectively and appropriately through a wide range of transcultural situations by combining culture-specific knowledge with mindful listening and communication skills. Throughout, helpful tables and charts and easy-to-follow guidelines for putting concepts into practice enhance the book's utility for students.
This volume provides comprehensible, strength-based perspectives on contemporary research and practice related to navigating mistakes, errors and failures across cultures. It addresses these concepts across cultural contexts and explores any or all of these three concepts from a positive psychology or positive organisational perspective, highlighting their potential as resources. The volume further discusses the consequences of errors and failures at individual, organisational and societal levels, ranging from severe personal problems to organisational and collective crises, perspectives how those can be turned into opportunities for contingent and sustainable improvement processes. The book shows that there are significant cultural differences in the understanding, interpretation and handling of errors and failures. This volume provides practical guidance for transcultural understanding of mistakes, errors and failure through new models, ideas for self-reflection, therapeutic and counselling interventions and organisational change management processes. This book is a must for researchers and practitioners working on mistakes, errors and failures across cultures and disciplines!
In any conflict the players seem to invariably view that conflict through the filter of their own cultural experiences. This collection of essays draws on a variety of disciplines to analyze fundamental assumptions about how conflict arises and how it is resolved.
After years of relative neglect, culture is finally receiving due recognition as a key factor in the evolution and resolution of conflicts. Unfortunately, however, when theorists and practitioners of conflict resolution speak of culture, they often understand and use it in a bewildering and unhelpful variety of ways. With sophistication and lucidity, "Culture and Conflict Resolution" exposes these shortcomings and proposes an alternative conception in which culture is seen as dynamic and derivative of individual experience. The book explores divergent theories of social conflict and differing strategies that shape the conduct of diplomacy, and examines the role that culture has (and has not) played in conflict resolution. The author is as forceful in critiquing those who would dismiss or diminish culture s relevance as he is trenchant in advocating conflict resolution approaches that make the most productive use of a coherent concept of culture. In a lively style, Avruch challenges both scholars and practitioners not only to develop a clearer understanding of what culture is, but also to take that understanding and incorporate it into more effective conflict resolution processes."
In keeping with a broad conception of interpersonal conflict, this book is organized into two parts. The first focuses on conflict on different types of couple relationships -- homosexual, cross cultural, dating but violent, engaged, and married -- and group relationships -- student peers, parents and their young children, and adult children and their aging parents. The chapters not only review past research on conflict in some relationships, but also take a significant step forward in introducing a variety of other relationship types for future research on conflict. These chapters also offer evidence that conflict is experienced differently in different types of interpersonal relationships. The second part of this book describes basic underlying principles and programs for dealing with interpersonal conflicts. Chapters in this section discuss patterns of argument in everyday life, issues associated with competence in interpersonal conflict, and mediation as a form of intervention for resolution.
Duane Elmer offers a thorough and practical handbook for conflict resolution across Asian, Hispanic, African and Western cultures.
The Dynamics of Conflict When it was published in 2000, Bernie Mayer's The Dynamics of Conflict Resolution quickly became one of the seminal works in the conflict resolution field. The book bridged the gap between abstract theoretical approaches and practical handbooks and became an immensely valuable and accessible resource for experienced and novice practitioners, as well as for professors and students of conflict management who needed a deep yet practical view of conflict and methods for dealing with it. The Dynamics of Conflict is the second edition of Mayer's classic book. While building on the strengths of the first edition, this thoroughly revised and updated book keeps pace with the most current trends and research in the field and explores four key concepts: interactional dynamics, system dynamics, culture and conflict, and conflict engagement. Like the first edition, the focus of the new edition is on the ways we can productively think about conflict and conflict intervention, rather than on specific techniques and processes. Mayer presents ideas about conflict as a set of conceptual tools that build on one another and contribute to a multifaceted view of conflict and conflict intervention but that also stand on their own. Filled with illustrative examples, the book draws from the author's thirty years of experience with interpersonal, family, community, organizational, labor management, environmental, public policy, and international disputes and includes instances of conflicts that have been in the news. In addition, this vital resource contains information on the most important work that has been done in the past decade on culture, systems, and conflict engagement and shows how conflict concepts apply to new technologies such as online communication and conflict resolution efforts on the Web. In the concluding chapter Mayer explores how conflict intervention efforts fit into more general values about peace, democracy, and social justice, and the personal impact that conflict work as a field has on conflict specialists.
Argues that organisations need mediators, rather than divisive dictators, and outlines the 8 powerful skills required for cross-border leadership.
This volume's central purpose is to provide a clearly written, scholarly exploration of cultural variation regarding conflict resolution and in so doing, highlight certain alternatives to violence. It presents an interdisciplinary examination of how conflicts are perceived and handled in a variety of cultural settings. Drawing on data and models from anthropology, psychology, and political science, the chapters analyze conflict resolution across the societal spectrum, including cases from Western and non-Western traditions, complex and tribal societies, and violent and non-violent cultures. While demonstrating the extremely important impact of culture on conflict resolution processes, the book does not solely emphasize cultural specificity. Rather--through introductory chapters, section introductions, and a concluding chapter--the volume editors draw attention to cross-cultural patterns in an attempt to further the search for more general conflict principles. An explicit message throughout the book is that alternatives to violence exist. The volume demonstrates that at various levels--from the interpersonal to the international-- conflicts can be handled in ways that cause far less pain and destruction than violence. Chapters by psychologists discuss social and cognitive processes for facilitating the learning of alternatives to violence among children and youth. Anthropology contributors explore mechanisms for dealing with social conflict which allow some cultures to remain relatively peaceful and consider implications of their work for reducing violence in other societies. Chapters by former President of Costa Rica, Oscar Arias, and by political scientists examine how non-violent political solutions can be employed as alternatives to warfare and violent resistence.
Offering a primary focus on North American cultural and ethnic diversity while addressing global questions and issues, Counseling Across Cultures, Seventh Edition, edited by Paul B. Pederson, Walter J. Lonner, Juris G. Draguns, Joseph E. Trimble, and María R. Scharrón-del Río, draws on the expertise of 48 invited contributors to examine the cultural context of accurate assessment and appropriate interventions in counseling diverse clients. The book’s chapters highlight work with African Americans, Asian Americans, Latinos/as, American Indians, refugees, individuals in marginalized situations, international students, those with widely varying religious beliefs, and many others. Edited by pioneers in multicultural counseling, this volume articulates the positive contributions that can be achieved when multicultural awareness is incorporated into the training of counselors.
The second edition of this popular textbook explores the latest approaches to cross-cultural management, as well as presenting strategies and tactics for managing international assignments and global teams. With a clear emphasis on learning and development, the text encourages students to acquire skills in multicultural competence that will be highly valued by their future employers. This has never been as important as now, in a world where, increasingly, all managers are global managers and where management practices and processes can differ significantly across national and regional boundaries. This new edition has been updated after extensive market feedback to include new features: a new chapter on working and living abroad; applications boxes showing how theories and key concepts can be applied to solve real-life management problems; student questions to encourage critical thinking; and updated examples and references. Supplementary teaching and learning materials are available on a companion website at www.cambridge.org/steers. In addition, recommended in-depth cases for each chapter are available at www.iveycases.com/CaseMateBrowse.aspx.
For centuries Western military theory and practice focused on wars conducted in Europe among Europeans. Wars between the European powers and other peoples were thought to be unimportant by students of military affairs, and wars between non-Europeans were viewed as distant and irrelevant. Attention was focused on Great Power confrontations, and the many "little" wars fought throughout the globe were ignored or given short attention. As the twenty-first century approaches and the threat of war between the superpowers declines, our attention is drawn to conflicts between nations or ethnic groups with vastly different cultures. The United States, the last superpower, is divided in its motives to maintain its giant Cold War military structure or to create a new world police force that will react to and influence the outcome of intercultural conflict. Brought together by James C. Bradford, these essays by prominent military historians cover three thousand years and five continents in treating various examples of intercultural interaction. In his introduction, Roger Beaumont traces the evolution from Great Power conflicts to multinational and intercultural wars and examines in general terms the cross-cultural dimensions of warfare that have been heretofore largely ignored by military historians. The first two essays look at examples of intercultural cooperation in warfare. John F. Guilmartin, Jr., describes the use of diverse cultural elements in armies from Xenophon's Persians to the Hessians of the American Revolution. In a similar vein, Dennis Showalter examines the transference of European forms of warfare by regional military groups. Along the military frontier of the American West, Robert M. Utley finds classic examples of simple cultures at odds with a technologically complex one. John W. Bailey presents the diverse styles of American commanders in the post–Civil War West and deals with the dichotomy between civilizing mission and uncivilized methods. Richard W. Slatta reveals patterns in Argentina's military and cultural subjection of its Indians and gauchos over three centuries. Douglas Porch studies the strategy and tactics employed by France in its conquest of northwestern Africa. Carol Morris Petillo examines the American involvement in the Philippines, arguing that a half-century of military imperialism was a shaping experience for a new generation of military professionals. Finally, Robin Higham closes the book with a wide-ranging and impressionistic essay on intercultural command. Scholars of military history as well as the layperson interested in cross-cultural issues and the study of warfare will find The Military and Conflict between Cultures to be a thought provoking collection of essays on an important topic--one which has become increasingly significant in the post–Cold War era

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