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The internet and the mobile phone have disrupted many of our conventional understandings of ourselves and our relationships, raising anxieties and hopes about their effects on our lives. In this second edition of her timely and vibrant book, Nancy Baym provides frameworks for thinking critically about the roles of digital media in personal relationships. Rather than providing exuberant accounts or cautionary tales, it offers a data-grounded primer on how to make sense of these important changes in relational life Fully updated to reflect new developments in technology and digital scholarship, the book identifies the core relational issues these media disturb and shows how our talk about them echoes historical discussions about earlier communication technologies. Chapters explore how we use mediated language and nonverbal behavior to develop and maintain communities, social networks, and new relationships, and to maintain existing relationships in our everyday lives. The book combines research findings with lively examples to address questions such as: Can mediated interaction be warm and personal? Are people honest about themselves online? Can relationships that start online work? Do digital media damage the other relationships in our lives? Throughout, the book argues that these questions must be answered with firm understandings of media qualities and the social and personal contexts in which they are developed and used. This new edition of Personal Connections in the Digital Age will be required reading for all students and scholars of media, communication studies, and sociology, as well as all those who want a richer understanding of digital media and everyday life.
Explores and analyzes past and current technologies and trends in multimedia communication Digital natives—those persons born in the digital age—have an ever-widening range of wireless-enabled devices at their disposal. They are the drivers of multimedia communications, continually seeking out the technologies and distribution channels that best match their needs. This book outlines the changes in telecommunications that are occurring to meet these needs. It addresses the continually increasing requirement to provide connections that make the electronic encounter as natural and convenient as possible, exploring the vast assortment of devices that exist as part of everyday living for digital natives. Featuring precise diagrams and tables to illustrate the evolving environment, the book begins by describing the competitive interactions of telephone, cable TV, and cellular mobile companies in providing services and content. It outlines the creation of digital multimedia streams and how they are transported, explains what multimedia connections are available, and summarizes the activities of competitors while providing an overview of their markets and customer statistics. This book uniquely covers wireline, optical fiber, cable, and wireless access methods, explaining the coding required to create digital streams. It combines ethernet with provider bridging and multi-protocol label switching and highlights the necessity to serve legacy streams. In addition, the book addresses controversial issue: will incumbent communications providers ever overtake Internet as the chief source of digital feeds and popular contents? Featuring extensive references and a glossary of multimedia terms, Connections for the Digital Age is written for digital natives and other persons with an interest in multimedia communications; industrial, commercial, and financial managers; engineers; software professionals and Internet specialists; and students at technical schools and universities.
"Links" are among the most basic---and most unexamined---features of online life. Bringing together a prominent array of thinkers from industry and the academy, The Hyperlinked Society addresses a provocative series of questions about the ways in which hyperlinks organize behavior online. How do media producers' considerations of links change the way they approach their work, and how do these considerations in turn affect the ways that audiences consume news and entertainment? What role do economic and political considerations play in information producers' creation of links? How do links shape the size and scope of the public sphere in the digital age? Are hyperlinks "bridging" mechanisms that encourage people to see beyond their personal beliefs to a broader and more diverse world? Or do they simply reinforce existing bonds by encouraging people to ignore social and political perspectives that conflict with their existing interests and beliefs? This pathbreaking collection of essays will be valuable to anyone interested in the now taken for granted connections that structure communication, commerce, and civic discourse in the world of digital media. "This collection provides a broad and deep examination of the social, political, and economic implications of the evolving, web-based media environment. The Hyperlinked Society will be a very useful contribution to the scholarly debate about the role of the internet in modern society, and especially about the interaction between the internet and other media systems in modern society." ---Charles Steinfield, Professor and Chairperson, Department of Telecommunication, Information Studies, and Media, Michigan State University Joseph Turow is Robert Lewis Shayon Professor at the Annenberg School for Communication, University of Pennsylvania. He was named a Distinguished Scholar by the National Communication Association and a Fellow of the International Communication Association in 2010. He has authored eight books, edited five, and written more than 100 articles on mass media industries. His books include Niche Envy: Marketing Discrimination in the Digital Age and Breaking up America: Advertisers and the New Media World. Lokman Tsui is a doctoral candidate at the Annenberg School for Communication, University of Pennsylvania. His research interests center on new media and global communication. Cover image: This graph from Lada Adamic's chapter depicts the link structure of political blogs in the United States. The shapes reflect the blogs, and the colors of the shapes reflect political orientation---red for conservative blogs, blue for liberal ones. The size of each blog reflects the number of blogs that link to it. digitalculturebooks is an imprint of the University of Michigan Press and the Scholarly Publishing Office of the University of Michigan Library dedicated to publishing innovative and accessible work exploring new media and their impact on society, culture, and scholarly communication. Visit the website at www.digitalculture.org.
Written by two of the field's most eminent experts, this exciting new introduction to mass media makes connections between communication research and the reality of the media industry. Understanding Media in the Digital Age shows readers how to navigate the world of traditional and new media while fostering an understanding of mass communication theory, history, active research findings, and professional experience.
"Teaching and Learning with Digital Technologies is for all those concerned with the crucial impact of emerging digital technologies on teaching on learning. It explores what we mean by the digital age, its influence on teenage cultural practices and how it informs our understanding of knowledge, pedagogy and practice. By examining teaching with digital technologies through new learning theories cognisant of the digital age, it aims to both advance thinking and offer strategies for teaching technology-savvy students that will ensure meaningful learning. Illustrated throughout with case studies from across the subjects and the age range, key issues considered include: - How young people create and share knowledge both in and beyond the classroom and how current and new pedagogies can support this level of achievement - The use of complexity theory as a framework to explore teaching in the digital age - The way learning occurs - one way exchanges, online and face to face interactions, learning within a framework of constructivism, and in communities - What we mean by critical thinking, why it is important in a digital age, and how this can occur in the context of teaching - How students can create knowledge through a variety of teaching and learning activities, and how the knowledge being created can be shared, critiqued and evaluated. With an emphasis throughout on what it means for practice, this book aims to improve understanding of how learning theories currently work and can evolve in the future to promote truly effective learning in the digital era. It is essential reading for all student teachers, those engaged in Masters' level work, as well as students on Education Studies courses"-- Provided by publisher.
Gonzalez explains how companies can use temporary retail to generate customer loyalty, understand new markets, and test innovative concepts. She shows the seven most important ways that your brand can benefit from a pop-up ; why educating and empowering the customer is often the best marketing tool ; where retail is going and how to stay ahead of the curve ; and what to consider when launching a pop-up.
The debate over whether the Net is good or bad for us fills the airwaves and the blogosphere. But for all the heat of claim and counter-claim, the argument is essentially beside the point: It's here; it's everywhere. The real question is, do we direct technology, or do we let ourselves be directed by it and those who have mastered it? "Choose the former," writes Rushkoff, "and you gain access to the control panel of civilization. Choose the latter, and it could be the last real choice you get to make." In ten chapters, composed of ten "commands" accompanied by original illustrations from comic artist Leland Purvis, Rushkoff provides cyber enthusiasts and technophobes alike with the guidelines to navigate this new universe. In this spirited, accessible poetics of new media, Rushkoff picks up where Marshall McLuhan left off, helping readers come to recognize programming as the new literacy of the digital age--and as a template through which to see beyond social conventions and power structures that have vexed us for centuries. This is a friendly little book with a big and actionable message.
Robert Schleicher wrote the book on slot car racing—literally. In the three short years since Schleicher’s Slot Car Racing: Tips, Tricks & Track Plans was published, the hobby has been virtually transformed by new products and technologies. This new volume, a perfect complement to its predecessor, brings readers and racers up to date, offering a concise, comprehensive overview of slot car racing’s developments, along with expert, practical guidance for putting this information to good use. A primer on the latest digital and analog developments for both 1/32 and HO scales, Schleicher’s book delivers the lowdown on building cars from individual components on ready-to-race chassis, as well as popular tune-up tips to get even more speed and better handling out of today’s cars. Schleicher also provides track tests of 70 cars and a slot-car shootout featuring 23 more vehicles. Finally, Schleicher includes nearly 50 track plans: 14 tabletop-size plans for Scalextric, Classic, Carrera, Sport, SCX, and Ninco brand track; 14 plans modeled on real circuits like Watkins Glen, Monaco, Spa-Francorchamps, Sears Point, and the Bahrain and Shanghai F1 courses; and 17 4x8-foot HO scale plans. Illustrated throughout with color photography and track plan line art, this is the book that no serious slot car racer can afford to be without.
This edited book discusses the exciting field of Digital Creativity. Through exploring the current state of the creative industries, the authors show how technologies are reshaping our creative processes and how they are affecting the innovative creation of new products. Readers will discover how creative production processes are dominated by digital data transmission which makes the connection between people, ideas and creative processes easy to achieve within collaborative and co-creative environments. Since we rely on our senses to understand our world, perhaps of more significance is that technologies through 3D printing are returning from the digital to the physical world. Written by an interdisciplinary group of researchers this thought provoking book will appeal to academics and students from a wide range of backgrounds working or interested in the technologies that are shaping our experiences of the future.
Interfacing Ourselves consists of new work that examines digital life on three levels: individuals and digital identity; relationships routinely intertwining digital and physical connections; and broader institutional and societal realities that define the context of living in the digital age. A key focus is what it means in varied social arenas when most individuals live as co-presentor multi-present--simultaneously engaged in digital and physical space--alone and with others. Topics include how: digital life contributes to well-being; individuals experience digital dependency; a smartphone is more than a smartphone; netiquette reveals social change; some online communities become prosocial salient havens while others reinforce social inequality; Millennials build intimacy; Latinx do familismo; and digital surveillance and big data redefine consumerism, advocacy, and civic engagement. Six chapters incorporate insights from hourly journals of Millennials undergoing a period of digital abstinence. Other chapters draw from surveys, digital auto-ethnography, content analysis, and other methods to explore digital life at the level of individual and interactive experience, and at a broader institutional and societal level. Ultimately, the book presents the need for living a mindful digital life by developing greater awareness as an individual, a social being, and a netizen and citizen. rate insights from hourly journals of Millennials undergoing a period of digital abstinence. Other chapters draw from surveys, digital auto-ethnography, content analysis, and other methods to explore digital life at the level of individual and interactive experience, and at a broader institutional and societal level. Ultimately, the book presents the need for living a mindful digital life by developing greater awareness as an individual, a social being, and a netizen and citizen.
Creating Authentic Customer Connections in a High-Tech World In The Relationship Economy, author John DiJulius teaches business leaders about the importance of relationship building in the digital age. He argues that in spite of (and because of) the advances in tech, we've become a less connected society. We have dramatically evolved away from face-to-face communication, and the skill of building rapport is evaporating. This means that customer personalization and relationships are more important now than ever—and they will be the key to success for businesses moving forward. As he aptly states, “Being able to build true sustainable relationships is the biggest competitive advantage in a world where automation, artificial intelligence, and machine learning are eliminating the human experience, which is what creates the emotional connections that build true customer loyalty.” This book reminds readers of the importance of personal connections and shows them how to attain meaningful, lasting relationships with their customers.
The nexus between the digital revolution and adolescent sexual behavior has posed significant challenges to mental health practitioners, attorneys, and educators. These digital technologies may facilitate dangerous behaviors and serious consequences for some youth. Adolescent Sexual Development in the Digital Age considers adolescent sexual behavior in both clinical and legal contexts and provides a basis for clinicians, legal professionals, educators, policy makers, parents and the general public to understand the impact that technology has on human growth and development. The book's contributing authors are leading authorities in adolescent development, law, and ethics, fostering an interdisciplinary dialogue within the text. New technology poses many opportunities for both normal and risky sexual behavior in youth; including "sexting," social networking, cyber-sexual harassment, commercial exploitation of children, and child pornography. Beyond just cataloging the various technologies impacting sexual behavior, this volume offers guidance and strategies for addressing the issues created by the digital age.
How can you create an authentic learning environment—one where students ask questions, do research, and explore subjects that fascinate them—in today’s standards-driven atmosphere? Author Larissa Pahomov offers insightful answers based on her experience as a classroom teacher at the Science Leadership Academy—a public high school in Philadelphia that offers a rigorous college-prep curriculum and boasts a 99 percent graduation rate. Pahomov outlines a framework for learning structured around five core values: inquiry, research collaboration, presentation and reflection. For each value, she presents: * A detailed description of how the value can transform classroom practice and how a “digital connection” can enhance its application. * A step-by-step outline for how to implement the value, with examples from teachers in all subject areas. * Solutions to possible challenges and roadblocks that teachers may experience. * Suggestions for how to expand the value beyond the classroom to schoolwide practice.* Anecdotes from students, offering their perspectives on how they experienced the value in the classroom and after graduation. The framework is a guide, not a prescription, and middle and high school teachers—individually or as a team—can use it to structure whatever content and skills their current school or district requires. The book also includes suggestions for how to integrate technology into inquiry-based education, but the principles and approaches it describes can be applied successfully even in places without abundant technology. Both practical and inspiring, Authentic Learning in the Digital Age is an indispensable handbook for reinvigorating teaching and learning in a new era.
Museum Object Lessons for the Digital Age explores the nature of digital objects in museums, asking us to question our assumptions about the material, social and political foundations of digital practices. Through four wide-ranging chapters, each focused on a single object – a box, pen, effigy and cloak – this short, accessible book explores the legacies of earlier museum practices of collection, older forms of media (from dioramas to photography), and theories of how knowledge is produced in museums on a wide range of digital projects. Swooping from Ethnographic to Decorative Arts Collections, from the Google Art Project to bespoke digital experiments, Haidy Geismar explores the object lessons contained in digital form and asks what they can tell us about both the past and the future. Drawing on the author’s extensive experience working with collections across the world, Geismar argues for an understanding of digital media as material, rather than immaterial, and advocates for a more nuanced, ethnographic and historicised view of museum digitisation projects than those usually adopted in the celebratory accounts of new media in museums. By locating the digital as part of a longer history of material engagements, transformations and processes of translation, this book broadens our understanding of the reality effects that digital technologies create, and of how digital media can be mobilised in different parts of the world to very different effects.
The college application process—which entails multiple forms, essays, test scores, and deadlines—can be intimidating. For students without substantial school and family support, the complexity of this process can become a barrier to access. William G. Tierney, Tracy Fullerton, and their teams at the University of Southern California approach this challenge innovatively. Using the tools of online games and social media, they have developed ways to make applying for college much less intimidating. While the vast majority of college students use social media and gaming in their everyday lives, colleges and universities have been slow to recognize and harness the power of either. Postsecondary Play explores the significance of games and social media in higher education, and particularly how they can be used to attract, retain, educate, and socialize students. Tierney, a past president of the American Educational Research Association, has gathered some of the best research on the emerging role of games and social media in the classroom and how these tools can boost student confidence and increase college access. Scholars writing from a wide variety of disciplines—college access, social media, game studies, and learning sciences—provide concrete examples to illustrate the new and complex ways in which students learn in response to social media and games. Tierney and the contributors find that, although games can be powerful tools for encouraging underserved students, quality game design and mastering the concept of play—the ability to develop skills while engaging in the game—are essential in the effective use of serious games in teaching and learning. Summarizing a decade of research in game design and learning, Postsecondary Play will appeal to higher education scholars and students of learning, online gaming, education, and the media.
This book provides a recent and relevant coverage based on a systematic approach. Especially suitable for practitioners and managers, the book has also been classroom tested in IS/IT courses on security. It presents a systematic approach to build total systems solutions that combine policies, procedures, risk analysis, threat assessment through attack trees, honeypots, audits, and commercially available security packages to secure the modern IT assets (applications, databases, hosts, middleware services and platforms) as well as the paths (the wireless plus wired network) to these assets. After covering the security management and technology principles, the book shows how these principles can be used to protect the digital enterprise assets. The emphasis is on modern issues such as e-commerce, e-business and mobile application security; wireless security that includes security of Wi-Fi LANs, cellular networks, satellites, wireless home networks, wireless middleware, and mobile application servers; semantic Web security with a discussion of XML security; Web Services security, SAML (Security Assertion Markup Language)and .NET security; integration of control and audit concepts in establishing a secure environment. Numerous real-life examples and a single case study that is developed throughout the book highlight a case-oriented approach. Complete instructor materials (PowerPoint slides, course outline, project assignments) to support an academic or industrial course are provided. Additional details can be found at the author website (www.amjadumar.com)
Provides classroom teachers, instructional coaches, building and district administrators with a concrete road map to implement the tenets of 21st Century skills/themes using Digital Age Best Practices that includes the necessary research base, exemplars, and implementation strategies.
This book explores the phenomenon of online social networking in the contexts of a global multicultural society caught in the turmoil of the information and communication revolution. It offers readers an up-to-date overview of the field and pushes the area into new understandings of the topic within a multidimensional space.

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