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Cool BritanniaSnowier times in 1580-1930 than sinceGlobal warming and climate change have become headline news in recent years. Climate, however, has always changed. Thick ice covered most of Britain in the last Ice Age, and prehistoric man thrived during a warm climate after the ice melted. In a later warm period the Vikings farmed in Greenland, but then came the cold of the Little Ice Age for several centuries up to the mid 1800s. Climatologists in the 1900s noted some old writings that told of more snow in northern Europe then, including Britain. For this authoritative new book, the most experienced observer of British snow patches has combined forces with the keenest recent enthusiast who has stimulated many new voluntary observers. A factual review, it gives more evidence of a colder snowier Britain in the 1580s to early 1900s than since 1930. The most comprehensive historical account yet published for snow patches on British hills, it also collates for the lowlands much evidence that was previously unpublished or in obscure, little-known sources. The authors recount a few past extraordinary cases of severe snow affecting British folk, even in lowland southern England. Their verbatim quotations from early writers give a remarkably live impression, so that readers feel they are out in the cold with these pioneers of long ago. The modern scientific evidence is clear that the cool centuries described by the authors for Britain also affected the rest of Europe and indeed all other continents across the globe. Hence this book will be of interest to many readers far beyond Britannia.AuthorsAdam Watson, BSc, PhD, DSc, DUniv, raised in lowland Aberdeenshire, is a retired research ecologist aged 80. He began lifelong interests on winter snow in 1937, snow patches in 1938, the Cairngorms in 1939. A mountaineer and ski-mountaineer since boyhood, he has experienced Scotland, Iceland, Norway, Sweden, mainland Canada, Newfoundland, Baffin Island, Finland, Switzerland, Italy, Vancouver Island and Alaska. His main research was and is on population biology, behaviour and habitat of northern birds and mammals. In retirement he has contributed 16 scientific publications on snow patches since 1994. He is a Fellow of the Arctic Institute of North America, Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Royal Meteorological Society, Royal Society of Edinburgh, and Society of Biology. Since 1954 he has been a member of the Scottish Mountaineering Club and since 1968 author of the Club's District Guide to the Cairngorms.Iain Cameron, 37, was brought up in lowland Renfrewshire, and works as an environmental, safety and health manager. Since 2007 he has been a co-author with Adam Watson on the annual snow-patch paper published by the Royal Meteorological Society in their scientific journal Weather. Although living in south-east England, he spends many weekends each summer and autumn in the Scottish Highlands, doing detailed fieldwork on snow patches. During preparation of this book, he inspected works by early authors at the British Library, and visited sites in lowland England where early writers reported extraordinary summer snow patches. Since 2008 he has stimulated and coordinated many new voluntary observers of snow patches across Britain. Through them, he contributed the first comprehensive note on snow patches in England and Wales in summer 2010, published in Weather.
Cool Britannia and Multi-Ethnic Britain: Uncorking the Champagne Supernova attempts to move away from the melancholia of Cool Britannia and the discourse which often encases the period by repositioning this phenomenon through an ethnic minority perspective. In March 1997, the front page of the magazine Vanity Fair announced ‘London Swings! Again!’ This headline was a direct reference to the swinging London of the 1960s – the English capital which became the era-defining epicentre of the world for its burgeoning rock and pop music scene, with its daring new youth culture, and the boutique fashion houses of Carnaby Street captured most indelibly by the Mods, Rockers, and psychedelic hippies of the time. In the 1990s this renewed interest in the swinging 60s seemed to reinvigorate popular culture, after a global period in the 1980s which would see the collapse of traditional communism and the ending of Cold War, while ushering in the beginnings of a new technological age spearheaded by Apple, Microsoft, and IBM. The dawn of the 1990s meant that peace and love would once again reign supreme, with Britannia being at the forefront of ‘cool’ again. Godfathers of the Mancunian Rock scene New Order would declare ‘Love had the world in motion’ and, for a fleeting period, Britain was about to encounter its second coming as the cultural epicentre of the world. Although history proffers a period of utopia, inclusion, and cultural integration, the narrative alters considerably when exploring this euphoric period through a discriminatory and racialised lens. This book repositions the ethnic minority–lived experience during the 1990s from the societal and political margins to the centre. The lexicon explored here attempts to provide an altogether different discourse that allows us to reflect on seminal and racially discriminatory episodes during the 1990s that subsequently illuminated the systemic racism sustained by the state. The Cool Britannia years become a metaphoric reference point for presenting a Britain that was culturally splintered in many ways. This book utilises storytelling and auto-ethnography as an instrument to unpack the historical amnesia that ensues when unpacking the racialised plights of the time.
Cool Britannia? draws on new research to create a critical framework for approaching the drama of this period. It examines the work of established playwrights as well as the generation of young writers who emerged in the mid-1990s and explores a wide variety of key issues including cultural politics and constructions of race and gender.
Seminar paper from the year 2004 in the subject English Language and Literature Studies - Culture and Applied Geography, grade: 2,1, Dresden Technical University (Institut fur Anglistik), course: Hauptseminar London, 13 entries in the bibliography, language: English, abstract: The turning of the millennium was not only nervously expected by computer experts because of the millennium bug, but it also left its imprint on British political and cultural history. This date in the calendar, 2000 years after the birth of Christ, has offered a unique opportunity to celebrate human achievements and was a good reason to speculate about the future. This paper wants to discuss the reasons and the role of the millennium projects realised by the Labour government towards the end of the 20th century.
This volume explores the appropriation of the past in modern British culture. The twelve essays argue that to distinguish between "the new" and "the traditional" today often draws a false dichotomy. It argues that Britishness, in fact, has been the product of continuous creation throughout the 19th and 20th centuries.
Nation branding is the most recent feature of imagined nation-making in the history of nations. Facing global competition, national decision-makers aim to distinguish their countries from others by means of branding. Quite a few nations have considered the term ‘cool’ suitable for describing some essence of their country’s brand. Cool Nations. Media and the Social Imaginary of the Branded Country traces the mediated ways in which the transnational idea of "cool" has circulated from popular culture, fashion, and marketing into describing nations. The book explores the commodification of the nation, the shift to a promotional political culture, and the role of media in contributing to the circulation of the idea of the Cool Nation. The social imaginary of nation branding takes its theory and practices from marketing, unlike earlier imaginations based on ideas of democracy or citizenship. Cool Nations argues that "cool" is one of the vehicles through which the commodification of nations takes place.
A survey of " ... 60 diverse contemporary perspectives on Britishness ... " and its influence on life in Northern Ireland.
Provides an international forum where theatrical scholarship and practice can meet.
Beginning in 1994 and closing in the first months of 1998, the UK passed through a cultural moment as distinct and as celebrated as any since the war. Founded on rock music, celebrity, boom-time economics, and fleeting political optimism, this was "Cool Britannia." Records sold in the millions, a new celebrity elite emerged, and Tony Blair's Labour Party found itself returned to government. Drawing on interviews from all the major bands including Oasis, Blur, Elastica, and Suede, and from music journalists, record executives, and those close to government, Britpop! charts the rise and fall of the Britpop moment. In this wonderfully engaging, page-turning narrative, John Harris, currently the hottest young music journalist in the UK, argues that the high point of British music's cultural impact also signaled its effective demise. After all, if rock stars were now friends of government, how could they continue to matter?"Cool Britannia was an empty promise that was bound to end in tears. John Harris captures the moment when New Labour, desperately wanting to seem hip, invited Britpop into Downing Street. Irresistible."-Billy Bragg
The world sees Britain through the antics of Monty Python’s Flying Circus, the stiff-lipped, painfully class-conscious societies depicted in Gosford Parkand Remains of the Day, and the scathing diatribes of American Idol’s Simon Cowell. The images being projected from the island nation of England are so disparate these days that it’s hard to know what to think of the British. Chris Rojek explores this dilemma, looking at the myths, misconceptions, and stereotypes of the British. Drawing upon a wide range of sources in pop culture, politics, art, and history, Rojek examines how Britons are viewed both at home and abroad. From Austin Powers to King Arthur and Albion, and from Big Brother to international opinion polls, Rojek investigates what it means to be British in a globalized, multicultural world. Brit-Myth deftly avoids extreme nationalism or abstract scholarship, offering a new conception of Britishness that transcends race and emphasizes the integral role of individualism and nonconformity in British identity. Full of thought-provoking insights and engaging anecdotes, Brit-Myth will entertain both Anglophiles and those who want to learn more about the land under the Union Jack.
'A grade, A list oral history' The Sunday Times 'Eminently, moreishly readable' The New Statesmen 'A rollicking read' Mail on Sunday 'Entertaining' Observer The nineties was the decade when British culture reclaimed its position at the artistic centre of the world. Not since the 'Swinging Sixties' had art, comedy, fashion, film, football, literature and music interwoven into a blooming of national self-confidence. It was the decade of Lad Culture and Girl Power; of Blur vs Oasis. When fashion runways shone with British talent, Young British Artists became household names, football was 'coming home' and British film went worldwide. From Old Labour's defeat in 1992 through to New Labour's historic landslide in 1997, Don't Look Back In Anger chronicles the Cool Britannia age when the country united through a resurgence of patriotism and a celebration of all things British. But it was also an era of false promises and misplaced trust, when the weight of substance was based on the airlessness of branding, spin and the first stirrings of celebrity culture. A decade that started with hope then ended with the death of the 'people's princess' and 9/11 - an event that redefined a new world order. Through sixty-eight voices that epitomise the decade - including Tony Blair, John Major, Noel Gallagher, Damon Albarn, Tracey Emin, Keith Allen, Meera Syal, David Baddiel, Irvine Welsh and Steve Coogan - we re-live the epic highs and crashing lows of one of the most eventful periods in British history. Today, in an age where identity dominates the national agenda, Don't Look Back In Anger is a necessary and compelling historical document.
Prompted by the near-simultaneous rise to political influence of more than a dozen apparently similar parties across Western Europe, this collection offers a range of European case studies with selected global examples, such as the Front National, the late Pim Fortuyn, and India and the BJP.
The last few decades have been among the most dynamic within recent British cultural history. Artists across all genres and media have developed and re-fashioned their practice against a radically changing social and cultural landscape – both national and global. This book takes a fresh look at some of the themes, ideas and directions which have informed British art since the later 1980s through to the first decade of the new millennium. In addition to discussing some iconic images and examples, it also looks more broadly at the contexts in which a new ‘post-conceptual’ generation of artists, those typically born since the late 1950s and 1960s have approached and developed aspects of their professional practice. Contemporary British Art is an ideal introduction to the field. To guide the reader, the book is organised around genres or related practices – painting; sculpture and installation; and film, video and performance. The first chapter explores aspects of the contemporary art market and some of the contexts within which art is made, supported and exhibited. The chapters that discuss various genres of art practice also mention books that may be useful to support further reading. Extensively illustrated with a wide range of work (both known, and less well-known) from artists such as Chris Ofili, Rachel Whiteread, Damien Hirst, Banksy, Anthony Gormley, Jack Vettriano, Sam Taylor-Wood, Steve McQueen and Tracey Emin, and many more.
In recent years British theatre has seen a renaissance in playwriting that has been accompanied by a proliferation of writing awards, new writing groups and a ceaseless quest for fresh, authentic voices that will ensure the vitality and relevance of theatre in the twenty-first century. Rewriting the Nation is a perfect companion to Britain's burgeoning theatre writing scene that will prove invaluable to anyone wanting a better appreciation of why British theatre - at its best - remains one of the most celebrated and vigorous throughout the world. The books opens by defining what is meant by 'new writing' and providing a study of the system in which it is produced. It considers the work of the leading 'new writing' theatres, such as the Royal Court, the Traverse, the Bush, the Hampstead and the National theatres, together with the London fringe and the work of touring companies. In the second part, Sierz provides a fascinating survey of the main preoccupations and issues that have characterised new plays in the first decade of the twenty-first century. It argues that while under New Labour economic, political and social change continued apace, generating anxiety and uncertainty in the population, theatre has been able to articulate not only those anxieties and uncertainties but also to offer powerful images of the nation. At a time when the idea of a national identity is hotly debated, British theatre has made its own contribution to the debate by offering highly individual and distinctive visions of who we are and what we might want to become. In examining the work of many of the acclaimed and emerging British playwrights the book serves to provide a narrative of contemporary British playwriting. Just as their work has at times reflected disturbing truths about our national identity, Sierz shows how British playwrights are deeply involved in the project of rewriting the nation.
Contemporary Britain is the latest book from the bestselling author of British Civilization and American Civilization. It is a wide-ranging collection of sources concerning every important aspect of life in Britain today, from national identity to moral panics and offers an accurate snapshot of life in Britain at the beginning of the twenty-first century. Topics covered include: * Britain's role in world affairs * British national identity * constitutional reform within Britain * social institutions including the NHS * political parties * Morality and religion. Lively and accessible Contemporary Britain is the essential companion for anyone studying current British civilization.
Britpop and the English Music Tradition is the first study devoted exclusively to the Britpop phenomenon and its contexts. The genre of Britpop, with its assertion of Englishness, evolved at the same time that devolution was striking deep into the hegemonic claims of English culture to represent Britain. It is usually argued that Britpop, with its strident declarations of Englishness, was a response to the dominance of grunge. The contributors in this volume take a different point of view: that Britpop celebrated Englishness at a time when British culture, with its English hegemonic core, was being challenged and dismantled. It is now timely to look back on Britpop as a cultural phenomenon of the 1990s that can be set into the political context of its time, and into the cultural context of the last fifty years – a time of fundamental revision of what it means to be British and English. The book examines issues such as the historical antecedents of Britpop, the subjectivities governing the performative conventions of Britpop, the cultural context within which Britpop unfolded, and its influence on the post-Britpop music scene in the UK. While Britpop is central to the volume, discussion of this phenomenon is used as an opportunity to examine the particularities of English popular music since the turn of the twentieth century.
First published in 2006, Alek's Sierz's The Theatre of Martin Crimp provided a groundbreaking study of one of British theatre's leading contemporary playwrights. Combining Sierz's lucid prose and sharp analysis together with interviews with Martin Crimp and a host of directors and actors who have produced the work, it offered a richly rewarding and engaging assessment of this acutely satirical playwright. The second edition additionally explores the work produced between 2006 and 2013, both the major new plays and the translations and other work. The second edition considers The City, the 2008 companion play to The Country, Play House from 2012 and the new work for the Royal Court in late 2012. The two works that have brought Crimp considerable international acclaim in recent years, the updated rewrite of The Misanthrope which in 2009 played for several months in the West End starring Keira Knightley, and Crimp's translation of Botho Strauss's Big and Small (Barbican, 2012), together with Crimp's other work in translation are all covered. The Theatre of Martin Crimp remains the fullest, most readable account of Crimps's work for the stage.
A guide to all of the plays of Martin Crimp. For a decade, Martin Crimp has been in the vanguard of new writing for the British stage. His main stage plays include Dealing with Clair, The Treatment, Attempts on Her Life, The Country, and Cruel and Tender, with his 1997 masterpiece, Attempts on Her Life, arguably being one of the best plays of the past quarter century. By the author of the landmark study of contemporary British drama, In-Yer-Face Theatre, this is the first study of Martin Crimp's work for stage and radio. Arguing that Crimp is one of the most acute satirists of contemporary British society, Aleks Sierz provides an accessible and fascinating account of the playwright's work. As well as an account of each of Crimp's plays and an analysis of his oeuvre, the volume includes a wide-ranging interview with Crimp himself and interviews with all the key directors responsible for staging his work, including Sam Walters, Katie Mitchell, James Mcdonald and Lindsay Posner.

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