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"In the country of the blind, the one-eyed man is king." Or is he? In H. G. Wells' acclaimed tale, a stranded mountaineer encounters an isolated society in which his apparent advantage proves less than valuable. This thought-provoking fable is accompanied by other short stories, including "The Star," a gripping tale about a massive celestial object hurtling toward the Earth, as well as "The New Accelerator," "The Remarkable Case of Davidson's Eyes," "Under the Knife," and "The Queer Story of Brownlow's Newspaper." With the 1895 publication of his first novel, The Time Machine, Wells established himself as the foremost science-fiction writer of his era. This entertaining collection was selected and edited by Martin Gardner, who also provides an Afterword that offers insight into the liveliness and originality of Wells’ imagination.
In the nineteenth century, a small group of American idealists managed to actually build Charles Babbage's Analytical Engine and use it to develop Cliology, mathematical models that could chart the likely course of the future. Soon they were working to alter history's course as they thought best. By our own time, the Society has become the secret master of the world. But no secret can be kept forever, at least not without drastic measures. When her plans for some historic real estate lead developer and ex-reporter Sarah Beaumont to stumble across the Society's existence, it's just the first step into a baffling and deadly maze of conspiracies. At the Publisher's request, this title is being sold without Digital Rights Management Software (DRM) applied.
Entertaining tales from the foremost science-fiction writer of the early 20th century include the title tale, "The Star," "The New Accelerator," "The Remarkable Case of Davidson's Eyes," "Under the Knife," and others.
The murder of a controversial Scottish media mogul ignites “a high-octane political thriller doused in stinging satire” (The Sunday Times). Just when left-leaning journalist Jack Parlabane trades in his muckraking career for domestic quietude, the muck comes calling. Conservative tabloid tycoon Roland Voss, his wife, and their two ineffectual bodyguards have been found at Voss’s country estate with their throats slit. An arrest has been made, the media is pouncing, and Parlabane smells a fix. So does public defender Nicole Carrow. The pigeon is her former client, a harmless Robin Hood burglar now accused of breaking parole most spectacularly. But this is no simple frame-up. It’s more of a high-end conspiracy. Parlabane and Carrow are determined to do right—even as so many things are about to go wrong. Jack Parlabane, the hero of Christopher Brookmyre’s acclaimed series returns—along with the author’s trademark “sassy, nasty fast style of . . . Elmore Leonard and Carl Hiaasen” (The Guardian). “Brookmyre . . . twists his plotlines, throws out terrific one-liners, piles up corpses and contrives narrow escapes with the impeccable timing of a Swiss watchmaker. If there’s a code for fulfilling the requirements of a witty crime caper, surely he’s cracked it.” —The New York Times “A biting, violent, fiendishly funny story of bribery, blackmail, and murder in high places . . . for all lovers of hip, intelligent, action-packed crime thrillers.” —Booklist
The Country of the Blind and Other Stories brings together thirty-three of H. G. Wells' science fiction and fantasy short stories which were previously published separately in a variety of periodicals. The title refers to one of Wells' most popular short stories, included in this book.
Herbert George Wells was perhaps best known as the author of such classic works of science fiction as The Time Machine and War of the Worlds. But it was in his short stories, written when he was a young man embarking on a literary career, that he first explored the enormous potential of the scientific discoveries of the day. He described his stories as "a miscellany of inventions," yet his enthusiasm for science was tempered by an awareness of its horrifying destructive powers and the threat it could pose to the human race. A consummate storyteller, he made fantastic creatures and machines entirely believable; and, by placing ordinary men and women in extraordinary situations, he explored, with humor, what it means to be alive in a century of rapid scientific progress.

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