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The purpose of this book is not only to serve as an English-Spanish reference work to look up a term when needed, but also as a guide to learn the most frequently used legal terms. Learn just a few terms every day, and soon you will be acquainted with the most common legal terminology in English and Spanish.
Being bilingual is an asset; and mastering different fields of speciality will make a difference in your bilingual skills. This book can be a helpful resource to learn the essential English-Spanish LEGAL terms. Learn 4 to 5 terms each day and at the end of the year you will master the essential LEGAL terminology in this language combination. This book contains only the most frequently used LEGAL terminology in English and Spanish.
A Very Brief Overview of InterpretingCourt InterpretingInterpreter Qualifications and TalentsInterpretation TechniquesModes of Interpretation Used in Judiciary/CourtInterpretingListening TechniquesConsecutive Interpretation TechniquesNote-taking TechniquesSimultaneous Interpretation TechniquesOn-Sight Translation TechniquesMnemonics and MemoryCode of Professional Responsibilities forInterpretersIn the JudiciaryEthics ExercisesJudiciary Interpreters do not only Work in CriminalCourts, but alsoYou, as a Judiciary Interpreter, mustThe Criminal Justice SystemLaw EnforcementThe CourtsJuriesCorrectionsCertification for Interpreters in the U.S.Additional Self-Study ExercisesOaths or AffirmationsBail and BondsCommon Law vs Civil or Roman LawBurdens of ProofBasic Rights of a Person Charged with a CrimeHow a Person Moves Through the Criminal JusticeSystemCivil LawsuitsProcedures for Oral DepositionsAdditional Listening ExercisesAnswers to Ethics QuestionsSuggested Additional ReadingReliable Source of Dictionaries ANNEX I Crimes in North Carolina (8 pages)ANNEX II Glossary of Legal Terminology (37 pages)
Community Language Interpreting provides translation resource materials for teachers and students. Additionally, for those who plan to work as professional interpreters in Australia, it provides guidelines and intensive practice for interpreting in community settings.The introduction gives an overview of interpreting and outlines how to use the book. Lee and Buzo discuss the different modes of interpreting, note-taking techniques and professional ethics. The ten chapters each deal with a discrete area of community interpreting. Beginning with an introduction, the authors then establish the social and governmental context to the area in question. This is followed by preparation tasks and useful website links which encourage readers to do more research on the topic to broaden their background knowledge, general knowledge and knowledge of terminology relevant to the field in question.Tasks include questions on the ethical aspects of professional practice. Dialogue interpreting scripts and sight translation texts are provided, followed by consecutive interpreting passages.National Authority for Accreditation of Translators and Interpreters (NAATI) test specifications are followed and all dialogue interpreting scripts are original. As well, website links are included for source and full text access to other scripts of interest.Community Language Interpreting also features two units on interpreting in business settings and for visiting delegations. This is because these topics, while not strictly community interpreting topics, are practical and routinely included in accreditation tests.
Presents more than 100 possible job opportunities in the legal field, with information on education needed, training available, and salaries.
This volume is concerned with the profession and discipline of interpretation. The range of perspectives presented in this collection of essays exemplifies the rich diversity of the profession as we know it today. Interpreting has been known to exist through the ages, though it was not necessarily considered a profession as such. We can attribute the current standing of the practice, in large part, to the historical circumstances which determined it and the efforts of those who responded to the need for communication within these circumstances. In the same way, our anticipation of future needs and the measures we are taking to prepare our next generation of interpreters to meet them will undoubtedly shape the direction our profession takes in the 21st century. The contributors to this volume are practicing interpreters, teachers of interpretation, and administrators.
Written by distinguished legal and linguistic scholars and practitioners from the EU institutions, the contributions in this volume provide multidisciplinary perspectives on the vital role of language and culture as key forces shaping the dynamics of EU law. The broad spectrum of topics sheds light on major Europeanization processes at work: the gradual creation of a neutralized EU legal language with uniform concepts, for example, in the DCFR and CESL, and the emergence of a European legal culture. The main focus is on EU multilingual lawmaking, with special emphasis on problems of legal translation and term formation in the multilingual and multicultural European context, including comparative law aspects and an analysis of the advantages and disadvantages of translating from a lingua franca. Of equal importance are issues relating to the multilingual interpretation of EU legislation and case law by the national courts and interpretative techniques of the CJEU, as well as the viability of the autonomy of EU legal concepts and the need for the professionalization of court interpreters Union-wide in response to Directive 2010/64/EU. Offering a good mix of theory and practice, this book is intended for scholars, practitioners and students with a special interest in the legal-linguistic aspects of EU law and their impact on old and new Member States and candidate countries as well.
What is community interpreting? What are the roles of the community interpreter? What are the standards, evaluation methods and accreditation procedures pertaining to community interpreting? What training is available or required in this field? What are the current issues and practices in community interpreting in different parts of the world? These key questions, discussed at the first international conference on community interpreting, are addressed in this collection of selected conference papers. The merit of this volume is that it presents the first comprehensive and global view of a rapidly growing profession, which has developed out of the need to provide services to those who do not speak the official language(s) of a country. Both the problems and the successes related to the challenge of providing adequate community interpreting services in different countries are covered in this volume.
Court interpreting is becoming increasingly professionalized as the number of practitioners grows and judicial systems and legislatures throughout the world focus more on language rights as an element of due process. Introduction to Court Interpreting is the first course book for court interpreter training that is not oriented toward the judicial system of a particular country, but can be used in any country for training interpreters in any language combination. It covers the history of the profession, the legal basis for the interpreter's presence in the courtroom, criminal and civil procedure, comparative law, the role of the interpreter in the judiciary setting, ethical principles, techniques of interpreting, and resources for continuing education and research. Designed to be accessible to both teachers and students, it contains numerous practical exercises and suggestions for further reading, as well as a comprehensive bibliography. Many changes have taken place in the court interpreting profession and in the judicial systems of many countries in recent years. Introduction to Court Interpreting reflects these developments and addresses the need for an up-to-date, globalized approach to preparing an increasingly diverse student population to enter this challenging profession.
Dieser Sammelband analysiert die wesentlichen und prägnanten Punkte der praktischen Übersetzungslehre. Aus den zahlreichen für die Adäquatheit und die Richtigkeit der Übersetzungs- und Dolmetschleistungen relevanten Aspekten wurden zwei Teilbereiche ausgewählt: die Terminologie als feste Grundlage für die translatorische Äquivalenz und der Diskurs als prozessuale Basis für einen reibungslosen und erfolgreichen Dolmetschablauf. Die theoretischen Grundlagen und Methoden, auf welche für die Analysen zurückgegriffen wird, sind die der linguistischen und translatorischen Diskursanalyse. Sie versteht das Übersetzen und das Dolmetschen als ein zielgerichtetes Kommunikationsverfahren, welches mit diversen Formen der Sprachvermittlung eng verbunden ist. Die empirische Basis der Analyse berücksichtigt die wesentlichen Ansätze des Übersetzens und des Dolmetschens - von der Fachterminologie bis zu den kulturellen Aspekten des Translationsprozesses. This volume analyzes problems crucial to the science of practical translation. Among the many aspects which are important for the adequacy and correctness in translation and interpreting services, two areas were chosen - terminology as a firm base for translation equivalence and discourse as a procedural foundation for a successful translation process. The theoretical basis and methods which were used during the analysis are the ones which form the linguistic and translation discourse analysis. It presents translation and interpreting as a goal-oriented communication procedure, which is closely related to diverse forms of intercommunication. A characteristic feature of translation discourse analysis is that the object of the study is documented very closely with the terminology as a corpus of different specialized texts. Such an empirical base for the analysis takes into consideration the most significant approaches of translation and interpreting - from legal terminology to cultural aspects of the translation process.
This long needed reference on the innumerable and increasing ways that the law intersects with translation and interpreting features essays by scholars and professions from the United States, Australia, Hong Kong, Iceland, Israel, Japan, and Sweden. The essays range from sophisticated treatments of historical and hence philosophical variations in concept and practice to detailed practical advice on self-education. Essays show a particular concern for the challenges of courtroom discourse when the parties not only use different languages but operate from different cultural and legal traditions.
'This book is a must-have resource for any practising legal interpreter or student of interpreting in Australia. It covers a wide range of information relevant to the topic, including the Australian legal system and the criminal process, legal language and terminology, dynamics of the courtroom, code of ethics, the role of interpreters in the various legal settings (courts and tribunals, police, interpreters as expert opinion witnesses, transcription/translation of evidentiary audio recordings, etc), together with a list of important legal terms (with very useful and informative definitions) and practical dialogues that would be highly beneficial to use individually, in pairs or in a classroom. It is especially useful for people who are preparing for NAATI's Certified Interpreter test or Certified Specialist Legal Interpreter test, as it contains references to and explanations of a large number of legal concepts and procedures, as well as roles and practices of law enforcement agencies in Australia."--Back cover.
The Practice of Court Interpreting describes how the interpreter works in the court room and other legal settings. The book discusses what is involved in court interpreting: case preparation, ethics and procedure, the creation and avoidance of error, translation and legal documents, tape transcription and translation, testifying as an expert witness, and continuing education outside the classroom. The purpose of the book is to provide the interpreter with a map of the terrain and to suggest methods that will help insure an accurate result. The author, herself a practicing court interpreter, says: “The structure of the book follows the structure of the work as we do it.” The book is intended as a basic course book, as background reading for practicing court interpreters and for court officials who deal with interpreters.
What is community interpreting? What are the roles of the community interpreter? What are the standards, evaluation methods and accreditation procedures pertaining to community interpreting? What training is available or required in this field? What are the current issues and practices in community interpreting in different parts of the world? These key questions, discussed at the first international conference on community interpreting, are addressed in this collection of selected conference papers. The merit of this volume is that it presents the first comprehensive and global view of a rapidly growing profession, which has developed out of the need to provide services to those who do not speak the official language(s) of a country. Both the problems and the successes related to the challenge of providing adequate community interpreting services in different countries are covered in this volume.
"Many interpreters are employed as freelance or staff conference interpreters. This book provides background information on a large number of international organizations which employ interpreters. For example, in the case of the European Union and the United Nations, information is provided on language policy, recruitment procedures, and the number of interpreters employed plus listing all the different entities that make up the European Union and the United Nations. If you are confused about the Council of Europe, the European Commission, the Council of Ministers and the European Parliament, you will find the answers to your questions in this book." "Postal and Internet website addresses accompany all information. Professional interpreter Associations are listed which, via the internet, can be useful sources of new ideas for interpreters working thousands of miles away."--BOOK JACKET.

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