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For use in schools and libraries only. The isolated Maine village of Tarker Mills is terrorized by the horrifying bloodthirsty creature stalking its inhabitants at the time of the full moon.
A surrealistic tour-de-force for concert band, this work sizzles from the first note to the last. Inspired by the Stephen King story of the same name, the work shows the contemporary concert band at its best. Dark, foreboding, and yet triumphant, this is a can't miss selection for any concert.
SUMMARY: The first scream came from the snowbound railwayman who felt the fangs ripping at his throat. The next month there was a scream of ecstatic agony from the woman attacked in her snug bedroom. Now scenes of unbelieving horror come each time the full moon shines on the isolated Maine town of Tarker Mills. No one knows who will be attacked next. But one thing is sure. When the moon grows fat, a paralyzing fear sweeps through Tarker Mills. For snarls that sound like human words can be heard whining through the wind. And all around are the footprints of a monster whose hunger cannot be sated... "Cycle of the Werewolf"
If there's no such thing as werewolves then why are all my friends dead? A werewolf is preying upon the denizens of a small town. The only people who know what it is, who understand what is happening, are children. A group of third graders isn't exactly the most credible source of information, especially when it comes to the fantastical. They grow up being ridiculed, shunned, bullied and mistreated by their peers and the broader community. Years later it returns, but this time Thomas and his friends are prepared for it. As the body count rises and the tension mounts throughout the town, only The Freaks (as they call themselves), have come to terms with what it is. After all, they have seen it before. They have seen the blood it spilled firsthand. Nobody is above suspicion. Not even family members. Thomas and his friends cannot trust anyone, must suspect everyone. As children, they learned the truth. As grown werewolf hunters, they must use every bit of courage they have to face the monster. Nothing short of killing it will suffice. Inspired by horror stories and movies from when Werewolves were actually scary. When shifters had fangs. When monsters spilled blood and guts, and nobody cared how nice their abs were. An homage to Stephen King's Cycle of the Werewolf and movies such as An American Werewolf in London, and the Howling series, The Beast will curdle your blood with fear. A quick read, this novelette is intended to be devoured in one or two sittings. In the tradition of Edgar Alan Poe, this story should take just between one-half hour and one hour to finish. Primarily it is a reaction to the lack of good werewolf stories out there on the market today. With speculative fiction taking some very bold, yet unnecessary turns in the twenty-first century, The Beast is an attempt to seize on something purer. Sure, weredragon, alien invasion, sci-fi may be doing great and dominating today's ebook market, but there is something to be said for the kinds of stories that were popular when I was a kid; the kind with fangs, the kind that bite. "The Beast is one hell of a wild ride. One of the best horror stories I have read in a very long time. I had forgotten just how scary werewolves could actually be. An instant classic." - the author's totally biased friend.
More than one hundred quizzes and 1,500 questions test readers' knowledge of the works of Stephen King, offering puzzles and questions about the master of horror, his novels, short stories, and films
The Beast Books 1-3. The Complete Series of Bestselling Novellas in One Book. The Beast: A Werewolf Horror If there's no such thing as werewolves then why are all my friends dead? A werewolf is preying upon the denizens of a small town. The only people who know what it is, who understand what is happening, are children. A group of third graders isn't exactly the most credible source of information, especially when it comes to the fantastical. They grow up being ridiculed, shunned, bullied and mistreated by their peers and the broader community. Years later it returns, but this time Thomas and his friends are prepared for it. As the body count rises and the tension mounts throughout the town, only The Freaks (as they call themselves), have come to terms with what it is. After all, they have seen it before. They have seen the blood it spilled firsthand. Nobody is above suspicion. Not even family members. Thomas and his friends cannot trust anyone, must suspect everyone. As children, they learned the truth. As grown werewolf hunters, they must use every bit of courage they have to face the monster. Nothing short of killing it will suffice. Inspired by horror stories and movies from when Werewolves were actually scary. When shifters had fangs. When monsters spilled blood and guts, and nobody cared how nice their abs were. An homage to Stephen King's Cycle of the Werewolf and movies such as An American Werewolf in London, and the Howling series, The Beast will curdle your blood with fear. The Beast Returns: A Werewolf Horror I've become the very thing I swore to destroy. I've become the beast itself. Thomas awakens from surgery after a brutal stabbing leaves him nearly dead. He finds himself a helpless prisoner, awaiting trial for murder. Until the full moon comes. Until he changes for the first time... When he shifts, Thomas doesn't have control. As he commits savage act after savage act, of murder and dismemberment, his nerves shatter. Now on the run, he seeks solace with a pack of his own kind, but his presence throws the pack dynamic into chaos. As all hell breaks loose around him, Thomas tries to flee from his horrible past. Unable to tell who is friend, and who is foe, he enters a fight for his very survival. The Beast's Revenge: A Werewolf Horror The exciting conclusion to the bestselling series of werewolf novellas, The Beast! After running away from his pack Thomas tries to begin a new life on the other side of the country.Little does he know that a crazed bounty hunter pursues him. A bounty hunter who knows his dark secret. The pack, unwilling to let go of one of their own, tracks the young werewolf from Florida to Oregon. With Thomas's life on the line, and the possibility of the pack being exposed, they must race to find him before the bounty hunter.
Scotland: Global Cinema focuses on the explosion of filmmaking in Scotland in the 1990s and 2000s. It explores the various cinematic fantasies of Scotland created by contemporary filmmakers from all over the world who braved the weather to shoot in Scotla
What’s hiding in the woods? Here is the definitive account of today’s nationwide sightings of upright, canine creatures – which resemble traditional werewolves – and a thorough exploration of the nature and possible origins of the mysterious beast. “She has the ability to send chills up and down your spine.” —Brad Steiger, author of Real Ghosts, Restless Spirits, and Haunted Places “If you thought the likes of The Wolfman, The Twilight Saga: Eclipse, and Underworld had no basis in fact, it's time to think again!” —Nick Redfern, author of There's Something in the Woods “Real Wolfmen is a riveting work of amazing scope and depth. You’ll be hooked from the first page.”--Rosemary Ellen Guiley, author of The Encyclopedia of Vampires and Werewolves The U.S. has been invaded – if many dozens of eyewitnesses are to be believed – by upright, canine creatures that look like traditional werewolves and act as if they own our woods, fields, and highways. Sightings from coast to coast dating back to the 1930s compel us to ask exactly what these beasts are, and what they want. Researcher, author and newspaper reporter Linda S. Godfrey has been tracking the manwolf since the early 1990. In Real Wolfmen she presents the only large-scale cataloguing and investigation of reports of modern sightings of anomalous, upright canids. First-person accounts from Godfrey’s witnesses – who have encountered these creatures everywhere from outside their car windows to face-to-face on a late night stroll – describe the same human-sized canines: They are able to walk upright and hold food in their paws, interact fearlessly with humans, and suddenly and mysteriously disappear. Godfrey explores the most compelling cases from the modern history of such sightings, along with the latest reports, and undertakes a thorough exploration of the nature and possible origins of the creature.
In a thoughtful, well-informed study exploring fiction from throughout Stephen King's immense oeuvre, Heidi Strengell shows how this popular writer enriches his unique brand of horror by building on the traditions of his literary heritage. Tapping into the wellsprings of the gothic to reveal contemporary phobias, King invokes the abnormal and repressed sexuality of the vampire, the hubris of Frankenstein, the split identity of the werewolf, the domestic melodrama of the ghost tale. Drawing on myths and fairy tales, he creates characters who, like the heroic Roland the Gunslinger and the villainous Randall Flagg, may either reinforce or subvert the reader's childlike faith in society. And in the manner of the naturalist tradition, he reinforces a tension between the free will of the individual and the daunting hand of fate. Ultimately, Strengell shows how King shatters our illusions of safety and control: "King places his decent and basically good characters at the mercy of indifferent forces, survival depending on their moral strength and the responsibility they may take for their fellow men."
A Dark Night's Dreaming opens by defining the shape of horror fiction today, illuminating the genre's narrative themes, psychological and social contexts, and historical development. The core of the volume focuses on the lives and major works of the six who have dramatically shaped the genre: William Peter Blatty, Thomas Harris, Stephen King, Anne Rice, Peter Straub, and Whitley Strieber. A final chapter analyzes the complex relationship between horror fiction and its adaptation to film. Looking beyond the tormented maidens, madmen, monsters, and other archetypes of the genre, these critics differentiate contemporary Gothic fiction from that of earlier generations while demonstrating that horror remains one of the most important and consistent strains connecting the diverse elements of the American literary tradition. They comment on the genre's enormous popularity and undeniable influence in American society and scrutinize its changing representations of women, monsters, and gore. The volume concludes with an extensive bibliography of primary and secondary works.
This reference source on Stephen King's fiction provides details about characters, places and objects in each of King's novels and short stories and includes a biography section, interviews with family, friends and contemporaries, and sections on film adaptations and audio versions of his work.
In this book Denis Duclos demonstrates that the representation of on-screen violence reflects the deep-seated mythological beliefs rooted in American culture.
In this fascinating book, Brian J. Frost presents the first full-scale survey of werewolf literature covering both fiction and nonfiction works. He identifies principal elements in the werewolf myth, considers various theories of the phenomenon of shapeshifting, surveys nonfiction books, and traces the myth from its origins in ancient superstitions to its modern representations in fantasy and horror fiction. Frost's analysis encompasses fanciful medieval beliefs, popular works by Victorian authors, scholarly treatises and medical papers, and short stories from pulp magazines of the 1930s and 1940s. Revealing the complex nature of the werewolf phenomenon and its tremendous and continuing influence, The Essential Guide to Werewolf Literature is destined to become a standard reference on the subject.
The Dark Tower is now a major motion picture from Dreamworks starring Idris Elba as Roland and Matthew McConaughey as The Man in Black In his New York Times bestselling The Wind Through the Keyhole, Stephen King returns to the spectacular territory of the Dark Tower fantasy saga to tell a story about gunslinger Roland Deschain in his early days. The Wind Through the Keyhole is a sparkling contribution to the series that can be placed between Dark Tower IV and Dark Tower V. This Russian doll of a novel, a story within a story within a story, visits Roland and his ka-tet as a ferocious, frigid storm halts their progress along the Path of the Beam. Roland tells a tale from his early days as a gunslinger, in the guilt-ridden year following his mother’s death. Sent by his father to investigate evidence of a murderous shape-shifter, Roland takes charge of Bill Streeter, a brave but terrified boy who is the sole surviving witness to the beast’s most recent slaughter. Roland, himself only a teenager, calms the boy by reciting a story from the Book of Eld that his mother used to read to him at bedtime, “The Wind through the Keyhole.” “A person’s never too old for stories,” he says to Bill. “Man and boy, girl and woman, we live for them.” And stories like The Wind Through the Keyhole live for us with Stephen King’s fantastical magic that “creates the kind of fully imagined fictional landscapes a reader can inhabit for days at a stretch” (The Washington Post).
From the #1 New York Times bestselling authors of The Talisman, “an intelligent…suspenseful page-turner” (The Wall Street Journal) from “two master craftsmen, each at the top of his game” (The Washington Post). Twenty years ago, a boy named Jack Sawyer traveled to a parallel universe called the Territories to save his mother and her Territories “Twinner” from an agonizing death that would have brought cataclysm to the other world. Now Jack is a retired Los Angeles homicide detective living in the nearly nonexistent hamlet of Tamarack, Wisconsin. He has no recollection of his adventures in the Territories, and was compelled to leave the police force when an odd, happenstance event threatened to awaken those memories. When a series of gruesome murders occur in western Wisconsin that are reminiscent of those committed several decades ago by a madman named Albert Fish, the killer is dubbed “the Fishman,” and Jack’s buddy, the local chief of police, begs Jack to help the inexperienced force find him. But are these new killings merely the work of a disturbed individual, or has a mysterious and malignant force been unleashed in this quiet town? What causes Jack’s inexplicable waking dreams—if that is what they are—of robins’ eggs and red feathers? It’s almost as if someone is trying to tell him something. As this cryptic message becomes increasingly impossible to ignore, Jack is drawn back to the Territories and to his own hidden past, where he may find the soul-strength to enter a terrifying house at the end of a deserted tract of forest, there to encounter the obscene and ferocious evils sheltered within it.
The iconic, “extraordinary” (The Washington Post) collaboration between #1 bestselling author Stephen King and Peter Straub—an epic thriller about a young boy’s quest to save his mother’s life. Why had twelve-year-old Jack Sawyer’s mother frantically moved the two of them from Rodeo Drive to a New York City apartment to the Alhambra, a fading ocean resort and shuttered amusement park in New Hampshire? Who or what is she running from? She is dying . . . and even young Jack knows she can’t outrun death. But only he can save her—for he has been chosen to search for a prize across an epic landscape of dangers and lies, a realm of innocents and monsters, where everything Jack loves is on the line.
From the #1 New York Times bestselling author Stephen King, four “disturbing, fascinating” (The Washington Post) novellas—including the story “1922,” a Netflix original film—that explore the dark side of human nature. “The pages practically turn themselves” (USA TODAY) in Full Dark, No Stars, an unforgettable collection centered around the theme of retribution. In “1922,” a violence awakens inside a man when his wife proposes selling off the family homestead, setting in motion a grisly train of murder and madness. In “Big Driver”, a mystery writer is brutally assaulted by a stranger along a Massachusetts back road and plots a revenge that will bring her face-to-face with another stranger: the one inside herself. In “Fair Extension,” making a deal with the devil not only saves a man from terminal illness but also provides rich recompense for a lifetime of resentment. In “A Good Marriage,” the trust forged by more than twenty years of matrimony is irrevocably shattered when a woman makes a chance discovery leading to the horrifying implications of just who her husband really is. Like Different Seasons and Four Past Midnight, which generated such enduring hit films as The Shawshank Redemption and Stand by Me, King’s Full Dark, No Stars is a “page-turner” (The New York Times) “as gripping as his epic novels” (St. Louis Post-Dispatch), and “an extraordinary collection, thrillingly merciless, and a career high point” (The Telegraph, UK).
Horror fiction is an important part of the popular culture in many modern societies. This book compares and contrasts horror narratives from two distinct cultures—American and Japanese—with a focus on the characteristic mechanisms that make them successful, and on their culturally-specific aspects. Including a number of narratives belonging to film, literature, comics and video games, this book provides a comprehensive perspective of the genre. It sheds light on the differences and similarities in the depiction of fear and horror in America and Japan, while emphasizing narrative patterns in the context of their respective cultures.
Set in the fictional town of Castle Rock, Maine From #1 New York Times bestselling author Stephen King, a powerful tale of grief, of love's enduring bonds, and the haunting secrets of the past. Set in the Maine territory King has made mythic, Bag of Bones recounts the plight of forty-year-old bestselling novelist Mike Noonan, who is unable to stop grieving following the sudden death of his wife Jo, and who can no longer bear to face the blank screen of his computer. Now his nights are plagued by vivid nightmares, all set at the Maine summerhouse he calls Sara Laughs. Despite these dreams, or perhaps because of them, Mike returns to the lakeside getaway. There he finds his beloved Yankee town held in the grip of a powerful millionaire, Max Devore, who will do anything to take his three-year-old granddaughter away from her widowed young mother. As Mike is drawn into their struggle, as he falls in love with both mother and child, he is also drawn into the mystery of Sara Laughs, now the site of ghostly visitations, ever-escalating nightmares, and the sudden recovery of his writing ability. What are the forces that have been unleashed here—and what do they want of Mike Noonan? First published in 1998, Bag of Bones was an instant #1 New York Times bestseller. It was lauded at its publication as “hands down, Stephen King’s most narratively subversive fiction” (Entertainment Weekly) and his “most ambitious novel” (The Atlanta Journal-Constitution).
Magistrale discusses the themes that turn King's fiction into morality tales.

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