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Dutch earthenware has a universal reputation and is represented in the ceramic collections of the great museums. The Philadelphia Museum of Art has a comprehensive collection of Delft blue and white and polychrome earthenware. The collection contains a number of highly important and unique pieces. A selection of the most interesting pieces is published here for the first time. This exquisite, fully illustrated volume reveals the importance of faience production in Delft in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, while highlighting the exceptional quality of the Museum's collection. Illustrated entries on thirty-five objects in the collection, written by Ella Schaap, Curatorial Associate for Dutch Ceramics at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, describe the significant features and set them in historical context. An illustrated introduction to the history of Delft ceramic production by noted scholar Hans van Lemmen is informative and lively. This publication will appeal to interested visitors as well
A comprehensive, full-color exploration of tile art and production worldwide, from earliest times to the present day. The book is both an authoritative work of reference and a visual delight, ranging from ancient Greece, where the first fired roof tiles date from as early as the third millennium BC, to twentieth-century Mexico. Along the way we encounter stunning examples of the tiler's art: the enormous English medieval floor pavements from Byland Abbey and Clarendon Palace; figural tiles from China, intended to adorn roofs and ward off evil; the famous Iznik tiles from the Islamic world, with their richly decorative patterns; the highly stylised ceramic tiles of the Arts and Crafts movement; and the tiles created by some of the finest ceramic artists and potters of the twenty-first century. Placing the tiles firmly in their historical and cultural context, the book highlights both continuity and diversity, the dissemination of techniques and designs, and how tile art in one time and place has inspired and rejuvenated those in others. Tiles are also studied in terms of function as well as form, and the full range of architectural and practical purposes for which they have been used - from floors to roofs, stoves to bathrooms, cathedrals to metro stations - will be explored, along with the various techniques employed to create such versatile pieces. 5000 Years of Tiles is the essential, most comprehensive single volume for anyone interested in the ceramic, decorative, and architectural arts.
The volume examines the mutually constitutive relationship between the materiality of objects and their aesthetic meanings. Its approach connects material culture with art history, curation, technologies and practices of making. A central dimension of the case studies collected here is the mobility of objects between Europe and China and the transformations that unfold as a result of their transcultural lives. Many of the objects studied here are relatively unknown or understudied. The stories they recount suggest new ways of thinking about space, cultural geographies and the complex and often contradictory association of power and culture. These studies of transcultural objects can suggest pathways for museum experts by uncovering the multi-layered identities and temporalities of objects that can no longer be labelled as located in single regions. It is also addressed to students of art history, of European and Chinese studies and scholars of consumer culture. « This eagerly awaited volume offers deep and extensive insights into the fast-growing field of material culture studies. Its fresh approach to Eurasian objects and materialities will serve as useful reading for all scholars interested in transcultural and global studies. A very helpful introductory essay. » Sabine du Crest, University of Bordeaux Montaigne, Former Fellow, The Harvard University Center for Italian Renaissance Studies.
In his major new history, Paul Greenhalgh tells the story of ceramics as a story of human civilisation, from the Ancient Greeks to the present day. As a core craft technology, pottery has underpinned domesticity, business, religion, recreation, architecture, and art for millennia. Indeed, the history of ceramics parallels the development of human society. This fascinating and very human history traces the story of ceramic art and industry from the Ancient Greeks to the Romans and the medieval world; Islamic ceramic cultures and their influence on the Italian Renaissance; Chinese and European porcelain production; modernity and Art Nouveau; the rise of the studio potter, Art Deco, International Style and Mid-Century Modern, and finally, the contemporary explosion of ceramic making and the postmodern potter. Interwoven in this journey through time and place is the story of the pots themselves, the culture of the ceramics, and their character and meaning. Ceramics have had a presence in virtually every country and historical period, and have worked as a commodity servicing every social class. They are omnipresent: a ubiquitous art. Ceramic culture is a clear, unique, definable thing, and has an internal logic that holds it together through millennia. Hence ceramics is the most peculiar and extraordinary of all the arts. At once cheap, expensive, elite, plebeian, high-tech, low-tech, exotic, eccentric, comic, tragic, spiritual, and secular, it has revealed itself to be as fluid as the mud it is made from. Ceramics are the very stuff of how civilized life was, and is, led. This then is the story of human society's most surprising core causes and effects.
Provides over 1400 articles that deal with materials and techniques in art from ancient times to the present, including such media as ceramics, sculpture, metalwork, painting, works on paper, textiles, video, and computer art.
Some vols. include the museum's Annual report.
Tin-glazed pottery was imported from the Mediterranean over 500 years ago, but Delftware, with its distinctive blue-and-white designs influenced by Chinese porcelain, was first made in Northern Europe in the Netherlands, and subsequently in the burgeoning English potteries for the affluent middle classes. Changing fashions and the emergence of new materials and manufacturing techniques forced the obsolescence of Delftware by 1840, and pieces today command very high prices. Every piece in this catalogue is illustrated, in many cases with more than one view. The book also contains authoritative essays which provide a wider context for Delftware.
Lavishly color-illustrated history of so-called delftware tiles from precursors in southern Europe through development in Holland to imitators in other countries. Extensive discussion of pictorial themes, architectural use of tiles, and modern successors of the 17th century classics. Includes a substantial chapter on collecting tiles and includes a list of tile museums in Europe and the US. Annotation copyrighted by Book News, Inc., Portland, OR
At the beginning of the twenty-first century, scholarly interest in ceramics is at an all-time high. As a vehicle for much-needed synthesis, Ceramics in America is an interdisciplinary annual journal that examines the role of historical ceramics in the American context. Intended for collectors, historical archaeologists, curators, decorative arts students, social historians and contemporary potters, every issue features a variety of ground-breaking scholarly articles, new discoveries in the field, and book and exhibition reviews for this diverse audience. The 2006 issue of Ceramics in America will offer another comprehensive compilation of articles and new discoveries. This issue will review evidence of Dutch and English delft tiles used in seventeenth- and eighteenth-century American fireplaces. It will also feature new information about American stoneware and the archaeological recovery of commemorative wares related to George Washington in Alexandria, Virginia. The highlight of the journal will be the second part of John Austin's examination of potter Palin Thorely's career and production in Williamsburg, Virginia.

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