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This work provides a new, comprehensive update to the Arizona State University Dental Anthropology System (ASUDAS). Drawing upon her extensive experience in informatics, curating data, and dental morphological data acquisition, Edgar has developed accessible and user-friendly standardized images and descriptions of dental morphological variants. The manual provides nearly 400 illustrations that indicate ideal expressions of each dental trait. These drawings are coupled with over 650 photographs of real teeth, indicating real-world examples of each expression. Additionally, trait descriptions have been written to be clear, comparative, and easy to apply. Together, the images and descriptions are presented in a standardized form for quick and clear reference. All of these modifications to ASUDAS make it more usable for students and professionals alike. In addition to these features of the manual, the text makes a brief but strong argument for why dental morphology will continue to be a useful tool in biological anthropology through the 21st century.
A global study of dental variation offering insights into modern human origins.
Researchers have long had an interest in dental morphology as a genetic proxy to reconstruct population history. Much interest was fostered by the use of standard plaques and associated descriptions that comprise the Arizona State University Dental Anthropology System, developed by Christy G. Turner, II and students. This system has served as the foundation for hundreds of anthropological studies for over 30 years. In recognition of that success, this volume brings together some of the world's leading dental morphologists to expand upon the concepts and methods presented in the popular The Anthropology of Modern Human Teeth (Cambridge, 1997), leading the reader from method to applied research. After a preparatory section on the current knowledge of heritability and gene expression, a series of case studies demonstrate the utility of dental morphological study in both fossil and more recent populations (and individuals), from local to global scales.
Symposia of the Society for the Study of Human Biology, Volume V: Dental Anthropology is a collection of papers that covers the application of dental pathology in the context of anthropology. The book presents 15 studies that cover various human dental variables and relates to different anthropological factors. The dental variables considered in the articles include tooth morphology; occlusion and malocclusion of primate teeth; morphogenesis of deciduous molar pattern in man; and double-rooted human lower canine teeth. The text also covers topics about race specific dental traits such as radiographic study of the Neanderthal teeth from Krapina; crown characters of the deciduous dentition of the Japanese-American hybrids; and analysis of the American Indian dentition. The selection will be of great interest to evolutionary scientists, such as anthropologists and paleontologists.
This guide to scoring crown and root traits in human dentitions substantially builds on a seminal 1991 work by Turner, Nichol, and Scott. It provides detailed descriptions and multiple illustrations of each crown and root trait to help guide researchers to make consistent observations on trait expression, greatly reducing observer error. The book also reflects exciting new developments driven by technology that have significant ramifications for dental anthropology, particularly the recent development of a web-based application that computes the probability that an individual belongs to a particular genogeographic grouping based on combinations of crown and root traits; as such, the utility of these variables is expanded to forensic anthropology. This book is ideal for researchers and graduate students in the fields of dental, physical, and forensic anthropology and will serve as a methodological guide for many years to come.
Companion to Dental Anthropology presents a collection of original readings addressing all aspects and sub-disciplines of the field of dental anthropology—from its origins and evolution through to the latest scientific research. Represents the most comprehensive coverage of all sub-disciplines of dental anthropology available today Features individual chapters written by experts in their specific area of dental research Includes authors who also present results from their research through case studies or voiced opinions about their work Offers extensive coverage of topics relating to dental evolution, morphometric variation, and pathology
Teeth are one of the best sources of evidence for both identification and studies of demography, biological relationships and health in ancient human communities. This text introduces the complex biology of teeth and provides a practical guide to the: • excavation, cleaning, storage and recording of dental remains • identification of human teeth including those in a worn or fragmentary state • methods for studying variation in tooth morphology • study of microscopic internal and external structure of dental tissues, and methods of age-determination • estimation of age-at-death from dental development, tooth wear and dental histology • recording of dental disease in archaeological and museum collections Dental Anthropology is the text for students and researchers in anthropology and archaeology, together with others interested in dental remains from archaeological sites, museum collections or forensic cases.
Teeth and their surrounding structures are exceptional sources for addressing significant questions in numerous disciplines. In this publication, an international, multidisciplinary team of researchers addresses important issues on current aspects of dental morphology research from evolutionary, anatomical, clinical and archaeological perspectives. In combining leading-edge methods of data acquisition and analyses, such as molecular analyses and highly advanced non-destructive imaging technologies, the book demonstrates how information about various aspects of dental morphology can be used to explore the evolution of vertebrate life histories, a subject most relevant to our own species. The chapters provide profound discussions on dental evolution, dental morphology, dental tissues, dental growth and development, as well as on clinical aspects of dental morphology. As a special feature, the publication provides new information about the role of teeth as tools in reconstructing the nature and behaviour of past populations. This book will serve as an important reference for researchers of dental sciences, anatomy, evolutionary biology, paleoanthropology, paleontology, archaeology, prehistoric anthropology, comparative anatomy, genetics, embryology, and forensic medicine.
Bringing together a variety of accomplished dental researchers, this book covers a range of topics germane to the study of human and other primate teeth. The chapters encompass work on individuals to samples, ranging from prehistoric to modern times. The focus throughout the book is the methodology required for the study of modern dental anthropology, comprising the scientific methods in use today - ranging from simple observation to advanced computer-based analyses - which can be utilized by the reader in their own dental research. Originating from the 20th anniversary meeting of the Dental Anthropology Association, this is a valuable reference source for graduate students, academic researchers and professionals in the social and life sciences, as well as clinicians.
Shelley Saunders This book offers a welcome diversity of topics covering the broader subjects of teeth and the study of teeth by anthropologists. There is an impressive array of coverage here including the history of anthropological study of the teeth, morphology and structure, pathology and epidemiology, the relationship between nutrition, human behavior and the dentition, age and sex estimation from teeth, and geographic and genetic variation. Most chapter authors have provided thorough reviews of their subjects along with examples of recent analytical work and recommendations for future research. North American researchers should particularly appreciate the access to an extensive European literature cited in the individual chapter bibliographies. Physical anthropologists with even a passing interest in dental research should greet the publication of this book with pleasure since it adds to a growing list of books on how the study of teeth can tell us so much about past human populations. In addition to the archaeological applications, there is the forensic objective of dental anthropology which the editors refer to in their introduction which is dealt with in this volume. The chapters dealing with methods of sex determination, age estimation of juveniles and age estimation of adults using the teeth are exhaustive and exacting and of critical importance to both "osteoarchaeologists" and forensic anthropologists. Authors Liversidge, Herdeg and Rosing provide very clear guidelines for the use of dental formation standards in juvenile age estimation, recommendations that are so obviously necessary at this time.
Primate dentitions vary widely both between genera and between species within a genus. This book is a comparative dental anatomy of the teeth of living non-human primates that brings together information from many disciplines to present the most useful and comprehensive database possible in one consolidated text. The core of the book consists of comparative morphological and metrical descriptions with analyses, reference tables and illustrations of the permanent dentitions of 85 living primate species to establish a baseline for future investigations. The book also includes information on dental microstructure and its importance in understanding taxonomic relationships between species, data on deciduous dentitions, prenatal dental development and ontogenetic processes, and material to aid age estimation and life history studies. Primate Dentition will be an important reference work for researchers in primatology, dental and physical anthropology, comparative anatomy and dentistry as well as vertebrate paleontology and veterinary science.
An international group of experts in dental anthropology address key issues involving the impact of cultural and ecological factors on human dental development and variability. Living and prehistoric human populations from Africa, Australia, Europe and North America are included in this comprehensive volume which gives special attention to Asian populations. The wide range of topics discussed in this volume include how variation in cultural, and ecological factors influence calcification and eruption of the dentition, heritability of dental variations, tooth size and its use as an indicator of environmental stress of genetic determination, the spatial and temporal distribution of dental disease, and finally variation in dental morphology and tooth size between ethnic groups and prehistoric skeletal series.
"This book contains papers arising from a symposium held during a combined meeting of The International Union of Anthropological and Ethnological Sciences (IUAES), The Australian Anthropological Society (AAS) and The Association of Social Anthropologists of Aotearoa New Zealand at the University of Western Australia from July 5-8th, 2011. It follows on from a recently published Special Issue Supplement of Archives of Oral Biology, Volume 54, December 2009 that contains papers from an International Workshop on Oral Growth and Development held in Liverpool in 2007 and edited by Professor Alan Brook. Together, these two publications provide a comprehensive overview of state-of-the-art approaches to study dental development and variation, and open up opportunities for future collaborative research initiatives, a key aim of the International Collaborating Network in Oro-facial Genetics and Development that was founded in Liverpool in 2007."--Foreword, p. v.

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