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With more than 10 million books in print and more than 9.5 million calendars sold, DILBERT is the voice for the embattled cubicle dwelling Everyman. With best friend Dogbert and a veritable who's who of accompanying office characters, ranging from the Boss and Wally to Alice and Catbert, DILBERT offers a welcome dose of laughter in response to the inanity of corporate culture and middle management mores. DILBERT has become everyone's favourite corporate pin-up boy. Millions of office dwellers all over the world stick Scott Adams' comic strip to their cubicle walls when murdering their boss is not a viable option!
This book took an unconventional theme because we submit an unorthodox theme too. Karl Popper’s epistemology suggests that when the theory is refuted by observation, then it is time to look for a set of new approaches. In the first chapter, it is shown that Hilbert’s axiomatic program has failed not only by experiment (Mie theory does not agree with experiment) but also in terms of logic (Gödel theorem). Therefore we set out a new approach, starting from an old theory of Isaac Newton. Dilbert cartoon series often offer surprising for old problems, especially in this era of corporatocracy. Now we would call such an out-of-the-box solution to the old Hilbert axiomatic program as Dilbert way (or Dilbertian, if you wish). Readers may ask : but what can physicists learn from Dilbert cartoons? While it seems not obvious at first glance, yes we believe there is a great character of Dilbert cartoon, i.e. to put it in one phrase: “out-of-thebox and brutally honest.” From managers who tend to criticize other folks, only to make him/her looks smart. Or people who often send “FYI emails” only to make him/her looks managing well. We do think that such a brutal honesty is also needed in many fields of physics: from theoretical physics to applied physics, as will be discussed throughout this book.
This lighthearted and eye-opening book explores the role of comedy in cultural and political critiques of American society from the past century. • Provides a context, vocabulary, and perspective to better appreciate and understand American humor • Connects historical developments to cultural changes • Includes both academic references and popular works • Covers a wide range of artists over a variety of media • Examines and explains general trends in American comedy
Cynicism began as a school of philosophy that was largely inspired by Socrates and often decried by popular commentators as a social pathology, a nihilistic rebellion against the foundations of civilization. Modern definitions of the cynic describe an individual who is negative and sarcastic, violently opposed to established authority and social convention, and dedicated to existentialism. This book attempts to vindicate cynicism, arguing that it is both a progressive approach to social dilemmas and an enlightened understanding of the human condition. Chapter One establishes the foundations of classical Greek cynicism, while later chapters illustrate the varied faces of the cynic phenomenon in the persons of such disparate characters as Machiavelli, Nietzsche, Diogenes, the Dadaists, George Bataille, Samuel Beckett, Auberon Waugh, the creators of South Park, and others. Nietzsche is portrayed as the most important representative of both classical and postmodern cynicism, as well as the pivotal link between the two. The book focuses on significant periods of historical change, such as the Renaissance, and the historical cynics responsible for several seminal social ideas, including cosmopolitanism (citizenship of the world), asceticism (personal growth through self-testing), and parrhesia (finding one’s voice in the presence of tyrannical forces). The author claims that aspects of Greek cynicism are present in contemporary society, offering a positive strategy for living in a hostile world.
Inside Your Accomplishments Are Suspiciously Hard to Verify, Adams tackles the subjects of Elbonian slave labor, faulty product recalls, less-than-anonymous employee surveys, and more. If you've ever looked among your co-workers and thought, "I hope feral cats eat every one of you," or briefly celebrated a well-deserved promotion only to realize that the word "promotion" now means that you're responsible for doing two jobs for the price of one, then chances are you find the corporate cubicle culture represented inside Dilbert alive and well inside your own work environment--and that's exactly what makes Dilbert so topical and funny. From Dilbert's invention of a portable brain scanner (with a popcorn microwave option) to his moonlighting as a professional corporate crime scene cleaner, Your Accomplishments Are Suspiciously Hard to Verify chronicles pointless projects, interminable meetings, and ill-conceived office policies one Dilbert strip at a time.
In Problem Identified: And You're Probably Not Part of the Solution, cartoonist Scott Adams affectionately ridicules inept office colleagues--those co-workers behind the pointless projects, interminable meetings, and ill-conceived "downsizings"--in this thematically linked collection of Dilbert comic strips. Dilbert, the benchmark of office humors, continues to use its considerable powers of humor for the greater good, helping us to fight the good fight at work despite those around us whose job descriptions seem to include undercutting morale and generally doing everything possible to lead us into economic ruin.
Blasting clichéd career advice, the contrarian pundit and creator of Dilbert recounts the humorous ups and downs of his career, revealing the outsized role of luck in our lives and how best to play the system. Scott Adams has likely failed at more things than anyone you’ve ever met or anyone you’ve even heard of. So how did he go from hapless office worker and serial failure to the creator of Dilbert, one of the world’s most famous syndicated comic strips, in just a few years? In How to Fail at Almost Everything and Still Win Big, Adams shares the game plan he’s followed since he was a teen: invite failure in, embrace it, then pick its pocket. No career guide can offer advice that works for everyone. As Adams explains, your best bet is to study the ways of others who made it big and try to glean some tricks and strategies that make sense for you. Adams pulls back the covers on his own unusual life and shares how he turned one failure after another—including his corporate career, his inventions, his investments, and his two restaurants—into something good and lasting. There’s a lot to learn from his personal story, and a lot of entertainment along the way. Adams discovered some unlikely truths that helped to propel him forward. For instance: • Goals are for losers. Systems are for winners. • “Passion” is bull. What you need is personal energy. • A combination of mediocre skills can make you surprisingly valuable. • You can manage your odds in a way that makes you look lucky to others. Adams hopes you can laugh at his failures while discovering some unique and helpful ideas on your own path to personal victory. As he writes: “This is a story of one person’s unlikely success within the context of scores of embarrassing failures. Was my eventual success primarily a result of talent, luck, hard work, or an accidental just-right balance of each? All I know for sure is that I pursued a conscious strategy of managing my opportunities in a way that would make it easier for luck to find me.”

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