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The Doctor Who Programme Guide is the complete guide to every Doctor Who story shown on television. The stories are listed in order of broadcasting, starting with the first episode broadcast in 1963. Each entry includes the storyline, the cast list, and the names of the producer, script editor, writer and director, and the details of novelizations, video and audio cassette releases. This indispensable guide first appeared over twenty years ago, and immediately established itself as the single, most important reference work about Doctor Who. "THE bible to an entire generation of [Doctor Who] fans on both sides of the Atlantic." -Andrew Pixley, Celestial Toyroom "A real treat for Doctor Who buffs." -David McDonnell, Starlog "It sits invaluably upon every fan's bookshelf and is a constant source of reference." -Gary Russell, Doctor Who Monthly "A remarkable work of...dedicated scholarship." -Barry Letts, Producer, Doctor Who
Doctor Who has always contained a rich current of religious themes and ideas. In its very first episode it asked how humans rationalize the seemingly supernatural, as two snooping schoolteachers refused to accept that the TARDIS was real. More recently it has toyed with the mystery of Doctor's real name, perhaps an echo of ancient religions and rituals in which knowledge of the secret name of a god, angel or demon was thought to grant a mortal power over the entity. But why does Doctor Who intersect with religion so often, and what do such instances tell us about the society that produces the show and the viewers who engage with it? The writers of Religion and Doctor Who: Time and Relative Dimensions in Faith attempt to answer these questions through an in-depth analysis of the various treatments of religion throughout every era of the show's history. While the majority of chapters focus on the television show Doctor Who, the authors also look at audios, novels, and the response of fandom. Their analyses--all written in an accessible but academically thorough style--reveal that examining religion in a long-running series such as Doctor Who can contribute to a number of key debates within faith communities and religious history. Most importantly, it provides another way of looking at why Doctor Who continues to inspire, to engage, and to excite generations of passionate fans, whatever their position on faith. The contributors are drawn from the UK, the USA, and Australia, and their approaches are similarly diverse. Chapters have been written by film scholars and sociologists; theologians and historians; rhetoricians, philosophers and anthropologists. Some write from the perspective of a particular faith or belief; others write from the perspective of no religious belief. All, however, demonstrate a solid knowledge of and affection for the brilliance of Doctor Who.
Gothic Science Fiction explores the fascinating world of gothic influenced science fiction. From Frankenstein to Doctor Who and from H. G Wells to Stephen King, the book charts the rise of a genre and follows the descent into darkness that consumes it.
A comprehensive account of Doctor Who as a television series and product of popular culture.
This book is the first study of "Doctor Who" to explore the Doctor's adventures in all their manifestations: on television, audio, in print and beyond. Although focusing on the original series (1963-89), the collection recognizes that Doctor Who is a cultural phenomenon that has been "told" in many ways through a myriad of texts. Combining essays from academics as well as practitioners who have contributed to the ongoing narrative of Doctor Who, the collection encourages debate with contrasting opinions on the strengths (and weaknesses) of the program, offering a multi-perspective view of Doctor Who and the reasons for its endurance.

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