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John and Laura have come to Venice to try and escape the pain of their young daughter's death. But when they encounter two old women who claim to have second sight, they find that instead of laying their ghosts to rest they become caught up in a train of increasingly strange and violent events. The four other haunting, evocative stories in this volume also explore deep fears and longings, secrets and desires: a lonely teacher who investigates a mysterious American couple, a young woman confronting her father's past, a party of pilgrims who meet disaster in Jerusalem and a scientist who harnesses the power of the mind to chilling effect. "Don't Look Now" is a strange and intimate masterpiece: a perfect distillation of the confusion and desire that attend grief, which, as the story progresses, adventures forward through the winding streets of Venice with the logic of nightmare. - Ethan Rutherford: http://www.npr.org/2013/05/19/177638074/ghost-ships-murders-bird-attacks-stories-to-keep-you-awake
Andrea Heller has been married for seven years, but still likes to pretend she's single. She enjoys sitting on her own in bars, and watching what happens. But there's another couple watching too. They call themselves Saila and Pharaoh, but only after sundown. And it is after sundown that some terrible things are happening in the singles clubs in Cleveland. In six months, three women in their twenties have been brutally murdered. And each step that Homicide Detective Jack Paris takes to find their killer draws him closer to the heart of his own forbidden impulses. As the stakes become increasingly personal, Jack knows only one thing for certain. To enter the minds of Saila and Pharaoh is to enter a world from which no one ever fully returns...
An NYRB Original Daphne du Maurier wrote some of the most compelling and creepy novels of the twentieth century. In books like Rebecca, My Cousin Rachel, and Jamaica Inn she transformed the small dramas of everyday life—love, grief, jealousy—into the stuff of nightmares. Less known, though no less powerful, are her short stories, in which she gave free rein to her imagination in narratives of unflagging suspense. Patrick McGrath’s revelatory new selection of du Maurier’s stories shows her at her most chilling and most psychologically astute: a dead child reappears in the alleyways of Venice; routine eye surgery reveals the beast within to a meek housewife; nature revolts against man’s abuse by turning a benign species into an annihilating force; a dalliance with a beautiful stranger offers something more dangerous than a broken heart. McGrath draws on the whole of du Maurier’s long career and includes surprising discoveries together with famous stories like “The Birds.” Don’t Look Now is a perfect introduction to a peerless storyteller.
Julian Wolfreys introduces students to the central concept of transgression, showing how to interpret the concept from a number of theoretical standpoints. He demonstrates how texts from different cultural and historical periods can be read to examine the workings of 'transgression' and the way in which it has changed over time.
‘Does one desire the Yule-tide spirit, sir?’ ‘Certainly one does. I am all for it.’ Aunts, engagements, misunderstandings and hangover cures; this delightful collection from ‘the greatest chronicler of a certain kind of Englishness’ (Julian Fellowes) brings together a baker’s dozen of P. G. Wodehouse’s finest short stories. ‘A comic master’ David Walliams ‘A cavalcade of perfect joy’ Caitlin Moran
During the fi fteen years Glenda Baker was the publisher and editor-in-chief of NEWN, she read and critiqued hundreds of short stories. She also wrote many of her own. This volume contains twenty-two of Glendas storiesfrom short (21,000 words) to short-short (about 1,000 words) to flash fiction (52 words total) in which Glenda addresses subjects such as: After doing a favor for his boss, how does a man end up in an maze he cant find his way out of? What would happen if a contemporary kid created a golem? What secrets do three generations of women learn about each other while on a weekend trip to Cape Cod? How far will a passive-aggressive woman go if pushed to the limit?
While postwar British cinema and the British new wave have received much scholarly attention, the misunderstood period of the 1970s has been comparatively ignored. Don’t Look Now uncovers forgotten but richly rewarding films, including Nicolas Roeg’s Don’t Look Now and the films of Lindsay Anderson and Barney Platts-Mills. This volume offers insight into the careers of important filmmakers and sheds light on the genres of experimental film, horror, rock and punk films, as well as representations of the black community, shifts in gender politics, and adaptations of television comedies. The contributors ask searching questions about the nature of British film culture and its relationship to popular culture, television, and the cultural underground.
Reference Guide to Short Fiction provides study and commentary on the most instrumental writers of short fiction through the 20th century. International in scope, this single scholarly volume includes 779 entries on 377 authors and 402 short stories.
Teenage pregnancy has attracted the attention of sociologists, psychologists, social workers, teachers, politicians, taxpayers, and parents. But in the midst of gathering statistics and designing programs, few people have stopped long enough to pay close attention to the young people themselves—to try to understand who they are and what they feel about their lives. In this book, Daniel B. Frank has drawn a series of sensitive and revealing portraits of adolescents confronted with the fact of parenthood. For two years Frank worked as a tutor at Our Place, a Family Focus center for black teenagers in Evanston, Illinois, listening to them talk about their lives, their feelings, and their private dreams. The power of this volume lies in the voices of these young people describing the pleasures as well as the shocks and bruises of thier new role. Hope, disillusion, fortitude, loneliness: these themes occur and recur as each story unfolds. Readers will be drawn into the lives of these teenagers and will emerge with fresh insight and understanding about teenage parenthood. theirtheir
Even today, when information is literally at our fingertips, many people would have to admit they don't know much about Asperger's Syndrome. Now imagine a mother in the 1970s raising four children on her own, one of whom she now knows suffered from this form of autism. As difficult as raising a child with autism can be, the task was even more challenging several decades ago, when the doctor's solution to this syndrome was to prescribe Ritalin and suggest counseling. But raise an autistic child in the 1970s is just what Pat Gramig did. Her third child, James Patrick, affectionately nicknamed Jim Pat, was a mischievous typical boy whose shenanigans often left his mother worried, laughing, and at a loss for words, sometimes all at once. From locking her out of the house to taking the scissors to her hair, Jim Pat kept his mother on her toes. Pat knew her son was special, despite his differences. Anyone who has dealt with Asperger's on a personal level will find hope and comfort, as well as valuable information, in the pages of Don't Look Now, but Your Kid Is Showing.

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