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From a beloved master of crime fiction, Dress Her in Indigo is one of many classic novels featuring Travis McGee, the hard-boiled detective who lives on a houseboat. Travis McGee could never deny his old friend anything. So before Meyer even says please, McGee agrees to accompany him to Mexico to reconstruct the last mysterious months of a young woman’s life—on a fat expense account provided by the father who has lost touch with her. They think she’s fallen in with the usual post-teenage misfits and rebels. What they find is stranger, kinkier, and far more deadly. “To diggers a thousand years from now, the works of John D. MacDonald would be a treasure on the order of the tomb of Tutankhamen.”—Kurt Vonnegut All Meyer’s friend wants to know is whether his daughter was happy before she died in a car accident south of the border. But when McGee and Meyer step foot in the hippie enclave in Oaxaca that had become Bix Bowie’s last refuge, they get more than they bargained for. Not only had Bix made a whole group of dangerous, loathsome friends, but she was also mixed up in trafficking heroin into the United States. By the time she died, she was a shell of her former self. And the more McGee looks into things, the less accidental Bix’s death starts to seem. Features a new Introduction by Lee Child
'MacDonald had a huge influence on me . . . Reacher is like a fully detached version of Travis McGee' LEE CHILD Travis McGee isn’t your typical knight in shining armour. He only works when his cash runs out, and his rule is simple: He’ll help you find whatever was taken from you, as long as he can keep half. Travis McGee could never deny his old friend Meyer anything. So before he can even say please, Travis has agreed to accompany him to Mexico to look into the mysterious last months of the daughter of a rich friend. Expecting to find out that the young woman had fallen in with the usual misfits and rebels, what they actually discover is stranger, and far more deadly. The deeper Travis digs, the less accidental the death starts to seem . . . First published in 1969, Dress Her in Indigo features an introduction by Lee Child JOHN D. MACDONALD: A GRAND MASTER CRIME WRITER 'The great entertainer of our age, and a mesmerizing storyteller' - Stephen King 'Travis McGee is my favourite fiction detective. He’s great because he has a philosophical side – he will fight a bunch of mobsters in a car park and then have a muse about life, the universe and everything' - Tony Parsons 'A dominant influence on writers crafting the continuing series character . . . I envy the generation of readers just discovering Travis McGee' - Sue Grafton 'The consummate pro, a master storyteller and witty observer . . . The Travis McGee novels are among the finest works of fiction ever penned by an American author and they retain a remarkable sense of freshness' - Jonathan Kellerman '. . . my favorite novelist of all time' - Dean Koontz 'A master storyteller, a masterful suspense writer . . . John D. MacDonald is a shining example for all of us in the field' - Mary Higgins Clark 'What a joy that these timeless and treasured novels are available again' - Ed McBain 'There’s only one thing as good as reading a John D. MacDonald novel: reading it again . . . He is the all-time master of the American mystery novel' - John Saul
'MacDonald had a huge influence on me . . . Reacher is like a fully detached version of Travis McGee' LEE CHILD Travis McGee isn’t your typical knight in shining armour. He only works when his cash runs out, and his rule is simple: He’ll help you find whatever was taken from you, as long as he can keep half. When Travis McGee enters the prosperous town of Fort Courtney he quickly realises that something’s not quite right. Here to rescue the suicidal daughter of a deceased friend, Travis is shocked by the string of murders and suicides that is taking over the town. Then, just when it seems that things can’t get any stranger, Travis becomes the lead suspect in the murder of a local nurse. To save the young woman, he’s going to have to save himself first . . . First published in 1968, The Girl in the Plain Brown Wrapper features an introduction by Lee Child JOHN D. MACDONALD: A GRAND MASTER CRIME WRITER 'The great entertainer of our age, and a mesmerizing storyteller' - Stephen King 'Travis McGee is my favourite fiction detective. He’s great because he has a philosophical side – he will fight a bunch of mobsters in a car park and then have a muse about life, the universe and everything' - Tony Parsons 'A dominant influence on writers crafting the continuing series character . . . I envy the generation of readers just discovering Travis McGee' - Sue Grafton 'The consummate pro, a master storyteller and witty observer . . . The Travis McGee novels are among the finest works of fiction ever penned by an American author and they retain a remarkable sense of freshness' - Jonathan Kellerman '. . . my favorite novelist of all time' - Dean Koontz 'A master storyteller, a masterful suspense writer . . . John D. MacDonald is a shining example for all of us in the field' - Mary Higgins Clark 'What a joy that these timeless and treasured novels are available again' - Ed McBain 'There’s only one thing as good as reading a John D. MacDonald novel: reading it again . . . He is the all-time master of the American mystery novel' - John Saul
When Travis McGee's friend Meyer lent his boat to his niece Norma, and her new husband Even, the boat exploded out in the waters of the Florida Keys. Travis McGee thinks it's no accident, and clues lead him to ponder possibilities of drugs and also to wonder where Evan was when his wife was killed.... "Proves again that MacDonald keeps getting better with each new adventure." THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
This work explores John D. MacDonald's Travis McGee series, with special emphasis on MacDonald's examination of the conflicts and joys of twentieth-century American culture and society. MacDonald describes himself as a moralist and this, combined with his narrative gifts, infuses his ever-present concerns for the quality and durability of American life. The first and last chapters, respectively, discuss MacDonald's early novels and the four he wrote concurrently with the series. The remaining chapters analyze various themes that figure prominently in the series. MacDonald's thinking reflects many of the concerns of his fellow citizens during his writing career while revealing his own personal reaction to the society around him. Noting his sense of an uncaused evil in the world and his prolific inventiveness, this work examines MacDonald's narrative exploration of America in which he reveals an unwillingness to give up either his frequently pessimistic views of society or the hope that it can somehow continue. His posthumous Reading for Survival sounds the latter note in typical MacDonald fashion: Read and learn or die. McGee, in the hard-boiled detective tradition, exemplifies MacDonald's picture of the struggling, but coping, culture with no guarantees for the future.

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