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In 1581 Edmund Campion, a Jesuit priest working underground in Protestant England, was found guilty of treason and hanged, drawn and quartered at Tyburn. Years later he would be beatified. Evelyn Waugh's compelling and elegant narrative is a homage to the man he revered as a poet, scholar, hero and martyr. He tells Campion's story with a novelist's eye for detail, from his success as an Oxford scholar, through his travels around Europe, his doomed secret mission to England and on to his capture and dramatic trial. Vividly re-creating a time of persecution and surveillance, Evelyn Waugh - author of A Handful of Dust, Scoop, Vile Bodies, Brideshead Revisited and the Sword of Honour trilogy - writes that 'the hunted, trapped murdered priest is our contemporary and Campion's voice sounds to us across the centuries'.
Recount the life of Edmund Campion, saint and martyr in this newly revised and definitive version from TAN Books. A new and updated life of St. Edmund Campion, Simpson's classic biography has been thoroughly revised and enlarged by Fr. Peter Joseph. With a foreword by Cardinal Pell.
In the year 1581, after four days of debating six leading Anglican divines at the Tower of London, Jesuit Edmund Campion (1540-1581) was put to death because he would not deny his faith. In 1970, the martyred Campion was canonized a saint. A Jesuit Challenge is a book-length edition of previously unpublished Catholic manuscript accounts of those debates.. "As corrective historical documents, these Catholic manuscripts reveal a quite different picture of Campion and his opponents from that represented in the government's published version, and thus offer us a fuller and more balanced understanding of what actually took place. In addition to their historical value, the Catholic manuscripts also include lively exchanges between Campion and his opponents, and provide humanizing details about them. As personalized documents they capture the dramatic flavor of a series of spirited debates dealing with the major theological issues separating Protestant England from Catholic Rome in Elizabeth's reign.. "Together with a transcription of the Catholic manuscript accounts, Holleran supplies a general historical introduction to the debates, a detailed description of the manuscripts, brief supplementary commentaries about the debates, and a full set of explanatory notes.
The death of Edmund Campion in 1581 marked a disjunction between the world of printed untruth and private, handwritten, truth in early modern England. Gerard Kilroy traces the circulation of manuscripts connected with Campion to reveal a fascinating network that not only stretched from the Court to Warwickshire and East Anglia but also crossed the confessional boundaries. Kilroy shows that in this intricate web Sir John Harington was a key figure, using his disguise as a wit to conceal a lifelong dedication to Campion's memory. Sir Thomas Tresham is shown as expressing his devotion to Campion both in his coded buildings and in a previously unpublished manuscript, Bodleian MS Eng. th. b. 1-2, whose theological and cultural riches are here fully explored. This book provides startling new views about Campion's literary, historical and cultural impact in early modern England. The great strength of this study is its exploitation of archival manuscript sources, offering the first printed text and translation of Campion's Virgilian epic, a fully collated text of 'Why doe I use my paper, ynke and pen', and Harington's four decades of theological epigrams, printed for the first time in the order he so carefully designed. Edmund Campion: Memory and Transcription lays the foundations of the first full literary assessment of Campion the scholar, the impact he had on the literature of early modern England, and the long legacy in manuscript writing.
Essays exploring different facets of the life and influence of Edmund Campion, the sixteenth-century Jesuit and martyr.
Gerard Kilroy here draws on newly discovered manuscript sources to reveal Campion as a charismatic and affectionate scholar who was finding fulfilment as priest and teacher in Prague when he was summoned to lead the first Jesuit mission to England. The book offers fresh insights into the dramatic search for Campion, the populist nature of the disputations in the Tower, and the legal issues raised by his torture. It was the monarchical republic itself that made him the beloved ‘champion’ of the English Catholic community. Edmund Campion presents the most detailed and comprehensive picture to date of an historical figure whose loyalty and courage, in the trial and on the scaffold, swiftly became legendary across Europe.
From the famous Vision Books series of lives of saints for young people, this is the inspiring dramatic account of the colorful and courageous life and death of the martyr, St. Edmund Campion, hero of God's underground" during the persecutions of the Catholics in England in the 1500s. Campion, the most celebrated young scholar of his day, was on his way to becoming the Archbishop of Canterbury until a crisis of conscience turned him back to his Catholic faith. He fled England, became a Jesuit priest, and was sent back to be the leader of the underground ministry to the persecuted Catholics until, after a long and frustrated search, the government finally captured him and brutally executed him. His daring and brilliant underground ministry to Catholics all over England, his zeal for the faith, and his great courage and joy in the face of martyrdom are all related in this compelling story for youth.
Surveys the work of Evelyn Waugh and his literary explorations of the themes of Catholicism, society and the family.
In recent years, terrorism has become closely associated with martyrdom in the minds of many terrorists and in the view of nations around the world. In Islam, martyrdom is mostly conceived as "bearing witness" to faith and God. Martyrdom is also central to the Christian tradition, not only in the form of Christ's Passion or saints faced with persecution and death, but in the duty to lead a good and charitable life. In both religions, the association of religious martyrdom with political terror has a long and difficult history. The essays of this volume illuminate this history--following, for example, Christian martyrdom from its origins in the Roman world, to the experience of the deaths of "terrorist" leaders of the French Revolution, to parallels in the contemporary world--and explore historical parallels among Islamic, Christian, and secular traditions. Featuring essays from eminent scholars in a wide range of disciplines, Martyrdom and Terrorism provides a timely comparative history of the practices and discourses of terrorism and martyrdom from antiquity to the twenty-first century.
A definitive portrait of one of the most compelling monarchs England has ever had: Elizabeth I. 'We are a prince from a line of princes.' Lisa Hilton's majestic biography of Elizabeth I, 'The Virgin Queen', uses new research to present a fresh interpretation of Elizabeth as a queen who saw herself primarily as a Renaissance prince, delivering a very different perspective on her emotional and sexual life, and upon her attempts to mould England into a European state. Elizabeth was not an exceptional woman but an exceptional ruler, and this book challenges readers to reassess her reign, and the colourful drama, scandal and intrigue to which it is always linked.
Text & Presentation is an annual publication devoted to all aspects of theatre scholarship. It represents a selection of the best research presented at the international, interdisciplinary Comparative Drama Conference. This edition includes papers from the 33rd annual conference held in Los Angeles, California. Topics covered include Bernard Shaw's use of gardens and libraries in Widowers’ Houses, Northern Ireland emergency law in Brian Friel’s The Freedom of the City, cannibalism and surrogation in Hamletmachine, Sergei Eisenstein’s and Charlie Chaplin’s use of the “montage of attraction,” and adaptations of classic Greek tragedy in Mexico and Taiwan, among other topics.
The one hundred letters brought together for this book illustrate the range of Hugh Trevor-Roper's life and preoccupations: as an historian, a controversialist, a public intellectual, an adept in academic intrigues, a lover of literature, a traveller, a countryman. They depict a life of rich diversity; a mind of intellectual sparkle and eager curiosity; a character that relished the comédie humaine, and the absurdities, crotchets, and vanities of his contemporaries. The playful irony of Trevor-Roper's correspondence places him in a literary tradition stretching back to such great letter-writers as Madame de Sévigné and Horace Walpole. Though he generally shunned emotional self-exposure in correspondence as in company, his letters to the woman who became his wife reveal the surprising intensity and the raw depths of his feelings. Trevor-Roper was one of the most gifted scholars of his generation, and one of the most famous dons of his day. While still a young man, he made his name with his bestseller The Last Days of Hitler, and became notorious for his acerbic assaults on other historians. In his prime, Trevor-Roper appeared to have everything: a grey Bentley, a prestigious chair in Oxford, a beautiful country house, a wife with a title, and, eventually, a title of his own. But he failed to write the 'big book' expected of him, and tainted his reputation when in old age he erroneously authenticated the forged Hitler diaries. For an academic, Trevor-Roper's interests were extraordinarily wide, bringing him into contact with such diverse individuals as George Orwell and Margaret Thatcher, Albert Speer and Kim Philby, Katharine Hepburn and Rupert Murdoch. The tragicomedy of his tenure as Master of Peterhouse, Cambridge, provided an appropriate finale to a career packed with incident. Trevor-Roper's letters to Bernard Berenson, published as Letters from Oxford in 2006, gave pleasure to a wide variety of readers. This more general selection of his correspondence has been long anticipated, and will delight anyone who values wit, erudition, and clear prose.
Almost 200 entries tell the colorful stories of 347 Jesuit saints and martyrs. The brief biographies are arranged by calendar date and highlight significant information that reveals what it means to be a Jesuit and what it means to be saintly. This 1998 edition includes revised text, new indexes, and is illustrated with rare 17th century engravings.
This book is a unique meditation on the beauty of Christ and His saints and centers on several works of art by Fra Angelico. Saward has written a book not on art history but on the spendor of Catholic truth. Beauty is the splendor of truth.
Although many books have been written on Ignatian spirituality, most focus on highly specific and scholarly details, rendering them too academic and specialized for the average reader. This book remedies this problem by compiling a more general guide to the basic aspects of Ignatian spirituality. Addressing everything from the life of St. Ignatius Loyola to his Spiritual Exercises to methods of dealing with contemporary world issues in a Jesuit spirit, it offers a comprehensive yet conversational approach to Ignatian spirituality. Whether readers are studying or teaching at a Jesuit school, seeking spiritual direction on a retreat, discerning a possible vocation to the Society of Jesus, or simply seeking more exposure to Ignatian spirituality, this book is an invaluable guide. Book jacket.

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