Download Free Education And Empire Book in PDF and EPUB Free Download. You can read online Education And Empire and write the review.

This book tracks the changes in government involvement in Indigneous children's education over the nineteenth century, drawing on case studies from the Caribbean, Australia and South Africa. Schools were pivotal in the production and reproduction of racial difference in the colonies of settlement. Between 1833 and 1880, there were remarkable changes in thinking about education in Britain and the Empire with it increasingly seen as a government responsibility. At the same time, children's needs came to be seen as different to those of their parents, and childhood was approached as a time to make interventions into Indigenous people's lives. This period also saw shifts in thinking about race. Members of the public, researchers, missionaries and governments discussed the function of education, considering whether it could be used to further humanitarian or settler colonial aims. Underlying these questions were anxieties regarding the status of Indigenous people in newly colonised territories: the successful education of their children could show their potential for equality.
"Education, education, education" is a slogan of current government, but in the mid-nineteenth century it also was at the heart of the debate about Britain's position in the world. The social problems accompanying industrialization and rapid urban growth provoked a widespread debate which forced education onto the political agenda, and the new ideas about teaching methods, curricula and the physical and moral care of children developed rapidly. This study, based on a unique cache of records of the Admiralty Schools at Greenwich, provides an extraordinary and striking insight into the problems and the achievements of mid-nineteenth schools. The story is enhanced by the connection with the Royal Navy--a major arm of empire--and provides unprecedented insight into the forces at the root of the sweeping changes of the period.
Education for Empire brings together topics in American history often treated separately: schools, race, immigration, and empire building. During the Gilded Age and Progressive Era, American imperial ambitions abroad expanded as the country's public school system grew. How did this imperialism affect public education? School officials, teachers, and textbook authors used public education to place children, both native and foreign-born, on multiple uneven paths to citizenship. Using case studies from around the country, Clif Stratton deftly shows that public schooling and colonialism were intimately intertwined. This book reveals how students—from Asians in the U.S. West and Hawai‘i to blacks in the South, Mexicans in the Southwest, and Puerto Ricans in the Caribbean and New York City—grappled with the expectations of citizenship imposed by nationalist professionals at the helm of curriculum and policy. Students of American history, American studies, and the history of education will find Education for Empire an eminently valuable book.
This is a pre-1923 historical reproduction that was curated for quality. Quality assurance was conducted on each of these books in an attempt to remove books with imperfections introduced by the digitization process. Though we have made best efforts - the books may have occasional errors that do not impede the reading experience. We believe this work is culturally important and have elected to bring the book back into print as part of our continuing commitment to the preservation of printed works worldwide.
"The barbarian rules by force; the cultivated conqueror teaches." This maxim form the age of empire hints at the usually hidden connections between education and conquest. In Learning to Divide the World, John Willinsky brings these correlations to light, offering a balanced, humane, and beautifully written account of the ways that imperialism's educational legacy continues to separate us into black and white, east and west, primitive and civilized.
Contributes simultaneously to both British imperial and Indian history. This work demonstrates that missionary understandings and interactions with India, rather than being party to imperial ideologies, often diverged from metropolitan and imperial norms.
Looks At Educational Reform In 2 Leading Progressive Princely States In 20Th Century India-Baroda And Mysore. Argues For A Fundamental Remodelling Of Colonial India.

Best Books