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Illustrates how domain theory may be used as a basis for social and moral education.
Looks at the different ways in which women and men view moral problems, and discusses how children develop their moral orientation
What makes teaching a moral endeavor? How can we prepare classroom practitioners for engaging in that moral endeavor in meaningful and effective ways? This volume brings together leading scholar who draw upon both their academic expertise and substantial wisdom of practice to offer a variety of perspectives on the challenge of preparing today’s teachers for the moral work of teaching. Book Features: Examines the role that teacher preparation and development can play in addressing the moral work of teaching.Highlights the work of leading scholars from educational psychology, educational philosophy, and teacher education.Provides compelling insights for identifying the next generation of our nation’s best teachers. Contributors: Wolfgang Althof, Karen D. Benson, Marvin W. Berkowitz, Donald Blumenfeld-Jones, Elizabeth Campbell, Julie Canniff, Mary Crawford, Lana Daly, Rebecca Evers, Cathie Fallona, Gary Fenstermacher, Anthony Holter, Lisa E. Johnson, Daniel Lapsley, Darcia Narvaez, Virginia Navarro, Larry Nucci, Joy Pelton, Virginia Richardson, Don Senneville, David Shields, Barbara Stengel, Jonatha W. Vare, Marilyn Watson Matthew Sanger is associate professor of Educational Foundations in the College of Education at Idaho State University. Richard Osguthorpe is associate professor and chair of the Department of Curriculum, Instruction, and Foundational Studies at Boise State University. “The editors and contributors help us appreciate that many teachers come to the work precisely because of abiding moral commitments —to help others, to make a difference in the lives of the young, to give something back to society. But they also help us see how crucial it is to give candidates systematic support in coming to grips with the meaning of these commitments, and how to translate them into pedagogical action for the well-being of students and society alike.” —From the Foreword by David T. Hansen “This book sheds light into the core of professional morality. It should be a ‘must’ for each student teacher and for each practitioner around school life.” —Fritz Oser, professor of education and educational psychology, University of Fribourg, Switzerland “Lest we forget that teaching is inherently moral work, Sanger and Osguthorpe explain what this means for teachers and teacher educators. The combination of conceptual analysis and cases of teacher education practice make this book a valuable resource and welcome antidote to the current preoccupation with test scores.” —Sharon Feiman-Nemser, Brandeis University
What does it mean to say that a person has been educated? This question forms the basis of global education policy debates; from the way governments establish funding for national school systems, to the way children are treated in the classroom. Should there be a common ethical core to such polices? What kind of educational process should aboriginal groups in Labrador, Canada, have a moral right to, and should this process be different from what children in New York's boroughs have claim to? Should a school-based curriculum, such as the UK's National Curriculum, make well-being a central concern or are there other ethical dimensions to be addressed? Christopher Martin explores these questions and argues that the best way to consider them is to view education as a matter of public moral understanding. He brings together traditions of thought central to philosophy of education, such as R.S. Peters, and connects this tradition to the moral philosophy and critical theory of Jurgen Habermas, whose theory of Discourse Morality has previously been given little attention in education circles.
There is widespread agreement that schools should contribute to the moral development and character formation of their students. In fact, 80% of US states currently have mandates regarding character education. However, the pervasiveness of the support for moral and character education masks a high degree of controversy surrounding its meaning and methods. The purpose of this handbook is to supplant the prevalent ideological rhetoric of the field with a comprehensive, research-oriented volume that both describes the extensive changes that have occurred over the last fifteen years and points forward to the future. Now in its second edition, this book includes the latest applications of developmental and cognitive psychology to moral and character education from preschool to college settings, and much more.
This book provides an in-depth examination of adolescents’ social development in the context of the family. Grounded in social domain theory, the book draws on the author’s research over the past 25 years Draws from the results of in-depth interviews with more than 700 families Explores adolescent-parent relationships among ethnic majority and minority youth in the United States, as well as research with adolescents in Hong Kong and China Discusses extensive research on disclosure and secrecy during adolescence, parenting, autonomy, and moral development Considers both popular sources such as movies and public surveys, as well as scholarly sources drawn from anthropology, history, sociology, social psychology, and developmental psychology Explores how different strands of development, including autonomy, rights and justice, and society and social convention, become integrated and coordinated in adolescence
Advances in Experimental Moral Psychology brings together leading scholars in the field to provide fresh theoretical perspectives on research in philosophy and psychology. Reflecting a diverse and active field of study, contributors are drawn from across both subjects to pursue central questions concerning moral psychology. Covering a wide-ranging selection of arguments, issues and debates, topics includes the role of emotion in moral judgment (both at a general theoretical level and with regards to specific topics); the moral psychology behind political orientation; the nature and content of moral character and more higher-order questions concerning the status of morality itself. For philosophers and researchers in the social and behavioral science, this exciting new volume reveals the beneficial results of integrating these two disciplines and illustrates the promise of this experimental approach to moral psychology.

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