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The book examines how the absence of insurance in the past led to some special maritime liability law principles such as ‘general average’ (i.e., losses or expenses shared by all the parties to a maritime adventure) and the limitation of shipowners’ liability. In the absence of insurance, these principles served the function of insurance mostly for shipowners. As commercial marine insurance is now widely available, these principles have lost their justification and may in fact interfere with the most important goal of liability law i.e., deterrence from negligence. The work thus recommends their abolition. It further argues that when insurance is easily available and affordable to the both parties to a liability claim, the main goal of liability law should be deterrence as opposed to compensation. This is exactly the case with the maritime cargo liability claims where both cargo owners and shipowners are invariably insured. As a result, the sole focus of cargo liability law should be and to a great extent, is deterrence. On the other hand in the vessel-source oil pollution liability setting, pollution victims are not usually insured. Therefore oil pollution liability law has to cater both for compensation and deterrence, the two traditional goals of liability law. The final question the work addresses is whether the deterrent effect of liability law is affected by the availability of liability insurance. Contrary to the popular belief the work attempts to prove that the presence of liability insurance is not necessarily a hindrance but can be a complementary force towards the realization of deterrent goal of liability law.
Limitation of liability for maritime claims is an important system for the shipping industry. The original rationale for such a system was to encourage the shipping enterprise. However, in our today's much changed world, the system has been under severe attack and has been described as 'hopelessly anachronistic'. Yet, the debate over repeal or retention of the system is far from settled. This book traces the history and development of limitation law around the world. It compares various limitation laws in operation under different legal regimes. In particular, it analytically scrutinizes the limitation systems under U.S. law, Chinese law and international conventions. It explores the possibility of international uniformity of maritime limitation law and points out that complete uniformity will not be achieved unless the United States joins the international community. It concludes that although there is a need for reform of the system, limitation of liability for maritime claims is here to stay. This book also thoroughly examines the limitation system under the Chinese legal regime through comparison with U.S. law and in the context of international conventions. Both practitioners and academic scholars will find this book helpful in understanding Chinese law in general and Chinese maritime limitation of liability in particular.
In 2007, the International Max Planck Research School for Maritime Affairs together with the International Tribunal for the Law of the Sea (ITLOS), both based in Hamburg, decided to establish an annual lecture series, the "Hamburg Lectures on Maritime Affairs" - giving distinguished scholars and practitioners the opportunity to present and discuss recent developments in this field. The present volume - the second in the series - collects eight of the lectures held in 2009 and 2010 by David Joseph Attard, Lucius Caflisch, Beate Czerwenka, Lars Gorton, Francesco Munari, Kyriaki Noussia, Peter Wetterstein and Wolfgang Wurmnest.
This book discusses legal issues related to the principle of indemnity in marine insurance contracts as well as disputes that may arise in a representative sample of common and continental law jurisdictions. It offers a comparative examination of Australian, English, Canadian, French, Greek, Norwegian and U.S. law. It examines the scope for a legal reform and the potential of achieving a better, more flexible, and modern indemnification regime.
Marine Insurance: Law and Practice, Second Edition, continues to provide the most comprehensive and integrated account of the English law and practice of marine insurance. It provides readers with a fresh and up-to-date review of the modern law in the light of traditional principles and rules of underlying commercial law, and the specific statutory rules of marine insurance as interpreted by case law, as moderated in practice by market practices and standard form marine insurance clauses. Francis Rose clarifies the law’s underlying framework of principles and illustrates how it works in common contractual situations, explaining how the different components of the law interact. The new edition has been updated to incorporate: • the most recent case law: there have been some very important judgments handed down since the book first published, including: The Cendor MOP, The Silva, The Resolute and The Marina Iris • the implications of the introduction of: Institute Cargo Clauses 2009, the effect of the Gambling Act 2005 and the Third Parties (Rights Against Insurers) Act 2010 Law Commission reform proposals The book explores in detail the following areas: • the nature of insurance • insurable interest • the insurance contract • the premium • insured risks • marine risks • exclusions • losses • claims • subrogation • double insurance

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