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Substantially updated for the second edition, this engaging and innovative introduction to the environment and society uses key theoretical approaches to explore familiar objects. Features substantial revisions and updates for the second edition, including new chapters on E waste, mosquitoes and uranium, improved maps and graphics, new exercises, shorter theory chapters, and refocused sections on environmental solutions Discusses topics such as population and scarcity, commodities, environmental ethics, risks and hazards, and political economy and applies them to objects like bottled water, tuna, and trees Accessible for students, and accompanied by in-book and online resources including exercises and boxed discussions, an online test bank, notes, suggested reading, and website links for enhanced understanding Offers additional online support for instructors, including suggested teaching models, PowerPoint slides for each chapter with full-color graphics, and supplementary images and teaching material
Political ecology is a field that seeks to make sustainable outcomes more possible and imaginable, but also to critique and undermine the foundations of environmental injustice and destruction - from the wetland shores of the Gulf of Mexico and the forests of India to the slums of Tijuana and the suburbs of Arizona. Written in clear and straightforward language and fully updated in the light of recent events, this new edition of Political Ecology presents the core concepts, central thinkers, and key works of a fast-growing and highly eclectic field. Using urban and rural examples from both the developed and underdeveloped world, the book provides the first full history of the development of political ecology over the last century and considers the major challenges facing the field now and for the future. With study boxes, a range of illustrations, and new material throughout, this second edition argues that this urgent field, though chaotically diverse, is unified by a loose community of practice and by a certain kind of text, writing, and argument.
Can sociology help us to tackle environmental problems? What can sociology tell us about the nature of the environment and about the origins and consequences of environmental risks, hazards and change? In this important new book Alan Irwin maps out this emerging field of knowledge, teaching and research. He reviews the key sociological debates in the field and sets out a new framework for analysis and practice. Among the themes examined are constructivism and realism, sustainable development and theories of the risk society. Readers are also introduced to communities at risk, institutional regulation and the environmental consequences of technology. Particular topics for discussion include genetically modified organisms, nuclear power, pesticide safety and the local hazards of the chemical industry. Rather than maintaining a fixed boundary between nature and society, Irwin highlights the hybrid character of environmental issues and emphasizes the role of social and cultural factors within environmental policy. Combining theoretical discussion and case-studies with a sensitivity to the concerns of environmental policy and practice, Sociology and the Environment provides an excellent introduction to an expanding and immensely important field. It will be a valuable text for students and scholars in sociology, geography, environmental studies and related disciplines.
At the start of the twenty-first century, it can be argued that human societies have a greater impact on the environment than ever before. We have always been dependent upon, and interacted with, the 'natural' environment. However, the dramatic social changes of the past three centuries, have altered the form of our relationship with non-human nature to the extent that some would see people/planet relations as in a situation of crisis. Environment and Society provides a comprehensive and critical account of the ways in which we can think about the relationship between human societies and the environments with which they interact. It argues that human societies are ecologically embedded, and that environments are often socially embedded and constituted. It makes the different theoretical positions and empirical studies accessible to students, and includes chapter outlines and summaries, annotated further reading, boxed case-studies and discussion points.
Green Issues and Debates explores the multitude of threats to sustainable life on earth and the myriad of controversies surrounding potential solutions. The grayer shades of green are deeply examined, including such heady questions as: Is ethanol production from corn a recipe for famine? Does offshore drilling pose more of a risk to the environment than the problem it solves? Is "clean coal" a viable option or is it simply polluting the energy dilemma? Are genetically modified foods helpful or harmful? Well-respected scholars present more than 150 articles presented in A-to-Z format focusing on issues brought to the forefront by the green movement with carefully balanced pro and con viewpoints. A valuable tool for students of all facets of ecology, the environment, and sustainable development, the volume fully engages the reader, inspiring further debate within the classroom. Vivid photographs, searchable hyperlinks, numerous cross references, an extensive resource guide, and a clear, accessible writing style make the Green Society volumes ideal for the classroom as well as for research.
This third volume in the SAGE Series on Green Society lays out the contours of the field of agri-food studies. It draws on scholars working in the fields of political ecology, rural sociology, geography, and environmental studies to paint a picture of the past, present, and future of agriculture and food. It provides readers with a basic understanding of the institutions, practices, and concepts to identify what is and is not a "green" food. Because food is so intimately connected to our daily lives, the food system offers perhaps the most promise to make change in a sustainable direction. This volume addresses what a sustainable and green food system might look like, what policies would help realize it, and what kinds of tradeoffs we face in deciding which paths to choose. Green Food: An A-to-Z Guide provides people interested in food and agricultural systems the basic analytical and conceptual ideas that explain why our food system looks the way it does, and what can be done to change it for the better. Roughly 150 entries discuss how to address issues related to a green food system, and vivid photos, searchable hyperlinks, numerous cross references, an extensive resource guide, and a clear, accessible writing style make the Green Society volumes ideal for classroom use.
A hallmark of the past 100 years has been the greening of political thought and practice. Today, there are green political parties, green organizations, and green consumer goods, all of which show how our decisions to organize, donate, and consume have been infused with green politics, which in many ways is all about values. Green politics has grown in the popular imagination as well. Every day there are headlines about climate change, impacts of resource extraction, or chemical pollution in poor neighborhoods. Underlying all of these stories are classic political questions about power, representation, and ultimate values. Green Politics: An A-to-Z Guide covers the availability and distribution of such resources as energy and how they impact economic development, domestic politics, and international cooperation and conflict. Other issues of equal importance to be covered include watershed resources (what happens when countries share a river and one country siphons off or pollutes waters before they reach other countries), other natural resources (for instance, industrialized countries attempting to dictate to developing countries about rainforest resources, whaling countries versus those seeking total bans on whaling as an industry), air pollution, global health and epidemiology (e.g., constraining the spread of potential pandemics, radioactive fall-out across countries from nuclear accidents like Chernobyl). From A-to-Z, the politics of these and similar "green" issues are thoroughly explored via 150 signed entries. Vivid photographs, searchable hyperlinks, numerous cross references, an extensive resource guide, and a clear, accessible writing style make the Green Society volumes ideal for classroom use as well as for research.

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