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Melanie Klein's writings, particularly on infant development and psychosis, have been crucial both to theoretical work and to clinical practice. Envy and Gratitude collects her writings from 1946 until her death in 1960, including two papers published posthumously. Klein's major paper, 'Notes on Some Schizoid Mechanisms', introduces the concept of the paranoid-schizoid position, in which the infant ego splits, projects and introjects its objects - most particularly the mother - during the first few months of life. 'Envy and Gratitude' her last major work, introduces her theory of primary envy.
Cultures of the Death Drive is a comprehensive guide to the work of pioneering psychoanalyst Melanie Klein (1882–1960) and to developments in Kleinian theory to date. It is also an analysis and a demonstration of the distinctive usefulness of Klein’s thought for understanding modernist literature and visual art. Esther Sánchez-Pardo examines the issues that the seminal discourses of psychoanalysis and artistic modernism brought to the fore in the early twentieth century and points toward the uses of Kleinian thinking for reconceptualizing the complexities of identity and social relations today. Sánchez-Pardo argues that the troubled political atmosphere leading to both world wars created a melancholia fueled by “cultures of the death drive” and the related specters of object loss—loss of coherent and autonomous selves, of social orders where stability reigned, of metaphysical guarantees, and, in some cases, loss and fragmentation of empire. This melancholia permeated, and even propelled, modernist artistic discourses. Sánchez-Pardo shows how the work of Melanie Klein, the theorist of melancholia par excellence, uniquely illuminates modernist texts, particularly their representations of gender and sexualities. She offers a number of readings—of works by Virginia Woolf, René Magritte, Lytton Strachey, Djuna Barnes, and Countee Cullen—that reveal the problems melancholia posed for verbal and visual communication and the narrative and rhetorical strategies modernist artists derived to either express or overcome them. In her afterword, Sánchez-Pardo explicates the connections between modernist and contemporary melancholia. A valuable contribution to psychoanalytic theory, gender and sexuality studies, and the study of representation in literature and the visual arts, Cultures of the Death Drive is a necessary resource for those interested in the work of Melanie Klein.
A cloth-bound four-volume set including Melanie Klein's best-known works. This is a facsimile edition of the 1975 Hogarth Press four-volume set with a limited print-run of 300. Volume I - “Love, Guilt and Reparation” and Other Works 1921-1945 1. The Development of a Child (1921) 2. Inhibitions and Difficulties at Puberty (1922) 3. The Role of the School in the Libidinal Development of the Child (1923) 4. Early Analysis (1923) 5. A Contribution to the Psychogenesis of Tics (1925) 6. The Psychological Principles of Early Analysis (1926) 7. Symposium on Child-Analysis (1927) 8. Criminal Tendencies in Normal Children (1927) 9. Early Stages of the Oedipus Conflict (1928) 10. Personification in the Play of Children (1929) 11. Infantile Anxiety Situations Reflected in a Work of Art and in the Creative Impulse (1929) 12. The Importance ofSymbol-Formation in the Development of the Ego (1930) 13. The Psychotherapy of the Psychoses (1930) 14. A Contribution to the Theory of Intellectual Inhibition (I931) 15. The Early Development of Conscience in the Child (1933) 16. On Criminality (I934) 17. A Contribution to the Psychogenesis of Manic-Depressive States (1935) 18. Weaning (1936) 19. Love, Guilt and Reparation (I937) 20. Mourning and its Relation to Manic-Depressive States (1940) 21. The Oedipus Complex in the Light of Early Anxieties (1945) Volume II - The Psycho-Analysis of Children Part I THE TECHNIQUE OF CHILD ANALYSIS 1. The Psychological Foundations of Child Analysis 2. The Technique of Early Analysis 3· An Obsessional Neurosis in a Six-Year-Old Girl 4· The Technique of Analysis in the Latency Period 5· The Technique of Analysis in Puberty 6. Neurosis in Children 7. The Sexual Activities of Children Part II EARLY ANXIETY-SITUATIONS AND THEIR EFFECT ON THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE CHILD 8. Early Stages of the Oedipus Conflict and of Super-Ego Formation 9. The Relations Between Obsessional Neurosis and the Early Stages of the Super-Ego 10. The Significance of Early Anxiety-Situations in the Development of the Ego 11. The Effects of Early Anxiety-Situations on the Sexual Development of the Girl 12. The Effects of Early Anxiety-Situations on the Sexual Development of the Boy Volume III - “Envy and Gratitude” and Other Works 1946-1963 1. Notes on Some Schizoid Mechanisms (1946) 2. On the Theory of Anxiety and Guilt (1948) 3. On the Criteria for the Termination of a Psycho-Analysis (1950) 4· The Origins of Transference (1952) 5· The Mutual Influences in the Development of Ego and Id (1952) 6. Some Theoretical Conclusions Regarding the Emotional Life of the Infant (1952) 7. On Observing the Behaviour ofYoung Infants (1952) 8. The Psycho-Analytic Play Technique: Its History and Significance (1955) 9. On Identification (1955) 10. Envy and Gratitude (1957) 11. On the Development of Mental Functioning (1958) 12. Our Adult World and its Roots in Infancy (1959) 13. A Note on Depression in the Schizophrenic (1960o) 14. On Mental Health (1960) 15. Some Reflections on The Oresteia (1963) 16. On the Sense of Loneliness (1963) Short Contributions The Importance of Words in Early Analysis (1927) Note on 'A Dream of Forensic Interest' (1928) Theoretical Deductions from an Analysis of Dementia Praecox in Early Infancy (1929) Review of Woman's Periodicity by Mary Chadwick (1933) Some Psychological Considerations: A comment (1942) Volume IV - Narrative of a Child Analysis Sessions 1-93.
Clinicians who read this volume will be richly awarded by an expanded understanding of their patients and the therapeutic process.
This thoroughly updated resource is the only comprehensive anthology addressing frameworks for treatment, therapeutic modalities, and specialized clinical issues, themes, and dilemmas encountered in clinical social work practice. Editor Jerrold R. Brandell and other leading figures in the field present carefully devised methods, models, and techniques for responding to the needs of an increasingly diverse clientele. Key Features Coverage of the most commonly used theoretical frameworks and systems in social work practice Entirely new chapters devoted to clinical responses to terrorism and natural disasters, clinical case management, neurobiological theory, cross-cultural clinical practice, and research on clinical practice Completely revised chapters on psychopharmacology, dynamic approaches to brief and time-limited clinical social work, and clinical practice with gay men Content on the evidentiary base for clinical practice New, detailed clinical illustrations in many chapters offering valuable information about therapeutic process dimensions and the use of specialized methods and clinical techniques
The connections between religion and violence are complex and multifaceted. From the conflicts in Middle East and the Balkans to those in Southeast Asia and beyond, religion frames and legitimates political violence. Moreover, in international relations since 9/11, religious language and metaphors have acquired a new significance. In this context the emerging consensus appears to be not only that violence is intrinsic to religion, but also that religions incite, legitimate, and intensify political violence. However, such an unambiguous indictment of religions is incomplete in that it fails both to appreciate significant counter examples and to recognize the diversity that exists within religions on the issue of violence, particularly the religious roots of pacifism and the ethics of non-violence. This collection explores aspects of this ambivalence between religion and violence. It focuses on traditions of legitimation and pacifism within the three monotheistic religions: Judaism, Christianity and Islam, and concludes with an examination of this ambivalence as it unfolds in each tradition's engagement with the politics of gender.
This reference work offers a comprehensive compilation of current psychological research related to the construct of solitude Explores numerous psychological perspectives on solitude, including those from developmental, neuropsychological, social, personality, and clinical psychology Examines different developmental periods across the lifespan, and across a broad range of contexts, including natural environments, college campuses, relationships, meditation, and cyberspace Includes contributions from the leading international experts in the field Covers concepts and theoretical approaches, empirical research, as well as clinical applications
Many on the left lament an apathy or amnesia toward recent acts of war. Particularly during the George W. Bush administration's invasion of Iraq, opposition to war seemed to lack the heat and potency of the 1960s and 1970s, giving the impression that passionate dissent was all but dead. Through an analysis of three politically engaged works of art, Rosalyn Deutsche argues against this melancholic attitude, confirming the power of contemporary art to criticize subjectivity as well as war. Deutsche selects three videos centered on the deployment of the atomic bomb: Krzysztof Wodiczko's Hiroshima Projection (1999), made after the first Gulf War; Silvia Kolbowski's After Hiroshima mon amour (2005-2008); and Leslie Thornton's Let Me Count the Ways (2004-2008), which followed the U.S. invasion of Iraq. Each of these works confronts the ethical task of addressing historical disaster, and each explores the intersection of past and present wars. These artworks profoundly contribute to the discourse of war resistance, illuminating the complex dynamics of viewing and interpretation. Deutsche employs feminist and psychoanalytic approaches in her study, questioning both the role of totalizing images in the production of warlike subjects and the fantasies that perpetuate, especially among the left, traditional notions of political dissent. She ultimately reveals the passive collusion between leftist critique and dominant discourse in which personal dimensions of war are denied.
This is a timely and stimulating collection of essays on the importance of Freudian thought for analytic philosophy, investigating its impact on mind, ethics, sexuality, religion and epistemology. Marking a clear departure from the long-standing debate over whether Freudian thought is scientific or not, The Analytic Freud expands the framework of philosophical inquiry, demonstrating how fertile and mutually enriching the relationship between philosophy and psychoanalysis can be. The essays are divided into four clear sections, addressing the implications of Freud for philosophy of mind, ethics, sexuality and civilisation. The authors discuss the problems psychoanalysis poses for contemporary philosophy as well as what philosophy can learn from Freud's legacy and undeniable influence. For instance, The Analytic Freud discusses the problems presented by pyschoanalytic theories of the mind for the philosophy of language; the issues which current theories of mind and meaning raise for psychoanalytic accounts of emotion, metaphor, the will and self-deception; the question whether psychoanalytic theory is essential in understanding sexuality, love, humour and the tensions which arise out of personal relationships. The Analytic Freud is a critical and thorough examination of Freudian and post-Freudian theory, adding a welcome and significant dimension to the debate between psychoanalysis and contemporary philosophy.
Introducing Psychoanalysis brings together leading analysts to explain what psychoanalysis is and how it has developed, setting its ideas in their appropriate social and intellectual context. Based on lectures given at the British Psychoanalytic Society, the contributions capture the diversity of opinion among analysts to provide a clear and dynamic presentation of concepts such as: sexual perversions trauma and the possibility of recovery phantasy and reality interpreting and transference two views of the Oedipus complex projective identification the paranoid-schizoid and depressive positions symbolism and dreams. Frequently misunderstood subjects are demystified and the contributors' wealth of clinical and supervisory experience ensures that central concepts are explained with refreshing clarity. Clinical examples are included throughout and provide a valuable insight into the application of psychoanalytic ideas. This overview of the wide variety of psychoanalytic ideas that are current in Britain today will appeal to all those training and practicing in psychoanalysis and psychoanalytic psychotherapy, as well as those wishing to broaden their knowledge of this field.
Can a Baby Be an Enemy? Our world is in a deep, prolonged crisis. The threat of global nuclear war, the chronic condition of local wars, the imperilled environment, and mass star vation are among the major forms this crisis takes. The dangers of massive overkill, overexploitation of the environment, and overpopulation are well known, but surprisingly little has been said about their potential interac tions, their bearing upon each other. If there were to be a nuclear confronta tion between today's superpowers, it might not take place in today's world, but in a far less friendly habitat, such as the world may be some decades hence. And it need hardly be added that the era of this particular super power configuration may be waning rapidly, its place to be taken by other international arrangements not necessarily less threatening. To understand and cope with our situation we need correspondingly serious reflection. This volume forms a welcome part of that process. Un avoidably, a large part of our thinking about the issues of human survival must be oriented to physical and biological aspects of the total danger. But it has not escaped the authors of this book that, coupled with these aspects, there are profound psychological dangers, such as loss of the sense of futu rity, moral deterioration, and a fatalistic decline in the will to struggle to protect our home, the Earth.
In an exciting new approach to witchcraft studies, The Witch in the Western Imagination examines the visual representation of witches in early modern Europe. With vibrant and lucid prose, Lyndal Roper moves away from the typical witchcraft studies on trials, beliefs, and communal dynamics and instead considers the witch as a symbolic and malleable figure through a broad sweep of topics and time periods. Employing a wide selection of archival, literary, and visual materials, Roper presents a series of thematic studies that range from the role of emotions in Renaissance culture to demonology as entertainment, and from witchcraft as female embodiment to the clash of cultures on the brink of the Enlightenment. Rather than providing a vast synthesis or survey, this book is questioning and exploratory in nature and illuminates our understanding of the mental and psychic worlds of people in premodern Europe. Roper’s spectrum of theoretical interests will engage readers interested in cultural history, psychoanalytic theory, feminist theory, art history, and early modern European studies. These essays, three of which appear here for the first time in print, are complemented by more than forty images, from iconic paintings to marginal drawings on murals or picture frames. In her unique focus on the imagery of witchcraft, Lyndal Roper has succeeded in adding a compelling new dimension to the study of witchcraft in early modern Europe.
Despite advances in feminism, the "law of the father" remains the dominant model of Western psychological and cultural analysis, and the law of the mother continues to exist as an underdeveloped and marginal concept. In her radical rereading of the Greek myth, Oresteia, Amber Jacobs hopes to rectify the occlusion of the mother and reinforce her role as an active agent in the laws that determine and reinforce our cultural organization. According to Greek myth, Metis, Athena's mother, was Zeus's first wife. Zeus swallowed Metis to prevent her from bearing children who would overthrow him. Nevertheless, Metis bore Zeus a child-Athena-who sprang forth fully formed from his head. In Aeschylus's Oresteia, Athena's motherless status functions as a crucial justification for absolving Orestes of the crime of matricide. In his defense of Orestes, Zeus argues that the father is more important than the mother, using Athena's "motherless" birth as an example. Conducting a close reading of critical works on Aeschylus's text, Jacobs reveals that psychoanalytic theorists have unwittingly reproduced the denial of Metis in their own critiques. This repression, which can be found in the work of Sigmund Freud and Melanie Klein as well as in the work of more contemporary theorists such as André Green and Luce Irigaray, has resulted in both an incomplete analysis of Oresteia and an inability to account for the fantasies and unconscious processes that fall outside the oedipal/patricidal paradigm. By bringing the story of Athena's mother, Metis, to the forefront, Jacobs challenges the primacy of the Oedipus myth in Western culture and psychoanalysis and introduces a bold new theory of matricide and maternal law. She finds that the Metis myth exists in cryptic forms within Aeschylus's text, uncovering what she terms the "latent content of the Oresteian myth," and argues that the occlusion of the law of the mother is proof of the patriarchal structures underlying our contemporary social and psychic realities. Jacobs's work not only provides new insight into the Oresteian trilogy but also advances a postpatriarchal model of the symbolic order that has strong ramifications for psychoanalysis, feminism, and theories of representation, as well as for clinical practice and epistemology.
What kinds of questions do experienced therapists ask themselves when facing a new client? How can clinical expertise be taught? From the author of the landmark Psychoanalytic Diagnosis, this book takes clinicians step-by- step through developing an understanding of each client's unique psychology and using this information to guide and inform treatment decisions. McWilliams shows that while seasoned practitioners rely upon established diagnostic categories for record-keeping and insurance purposes, their actual clinical concepts and practices reflect more inferential, subjective, and intuitive processes. Interweaving illustrative case examples with theoretical insights and clinically significant research, chapters cover assessment of client temperament, developmental issues, defenses, affects, identifications, relational patterns, self-esteem needs, and pathogenic beliefs. Winner--Gradiva Award, National Association for the Advancement of Psychoanalysis
In Mastering Slavery, Fleischner draws upon a range of disciplines, including psychoanalysis, African-American studies, literary theory, social history, and gender studies, to analyze how the slave narratives--in their engagement with one another and with white women's antislavery fiction--yield a far more amplified and complicated notion of familial dynamics and identity than they have generally been thought to reveal. Her study exposes the impact of the entangled relations among master, mistress, slave adults and slave children on the sense of identity of individual slave narrators. She explores the ways in which our of the social, psychological, biological--and literary--crossings and disruptions slavery engendered, these autobiographers created mixed, dynamic narrative selves.
Contemporary Literary and Cultural Theory: The Johns Hopkins Guide is a clear, accessible, and detailed overview of the most important thinkers and topics in the field. Written by specialists from across disciplines, its entries cover contemporary theory from Adorno to Žižek, providing an informative and reliable introduction to a vast, challenging area of inquiry. Materials include newly commissioned articles along with essays drawn from The Johns Hopkins Guide to Literary Theory and Criticism, known as the definitive resource for students and scholars of literary theory and for philosophical reflection on literature and culture.
The Legacy of Fairbairn and Sutherland provides the first comprehensive review of W.R.D. Fairbairn and John Sutherland's theories on psycho-social development. It reviews Fairbairn and Sutherland's ideas, traces the philosophical roots of their thinking, explores their legacy, and demonstrates their relevance to contemporary practice. International contributors set these psychoanalytic theories in their philosophical and cultural context. They discuss the growing acceptance of Fairbairn and Sutherland's work in Europe and the Americas. They discuss the theories' impact on current thinking in subjects such as sexuality, hysteria, autonomy and repression. They re-examine the theories in the light of current clinical experience, illuminate them with reference to contemporary psychoanalytic theories and illustrate them with examples from work with children, adults, groups and families. This book presents an original fusion of the ideas of two of the most noteworthy figures in recent psychoanalysis. It will prove fascinating reading for all practicing and training psychotherapists and psychoanalysts.
This book will be important reading for those with an interest in Deleuze, but also in performance arts, film, and contemporary culture.

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