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A collection of "terms of venery," collective nouns. The origin of some of the terms is explained, and more than 250 of the terms are illustrated with engravings by Dürer and Grandville and others.
A pride of lions, a school of fish, a parliament of owls, a bevy of beauties, and exaltation of larks--the book that charmed word-lovers is back, expanded to include more than 1,000 terms. Accompanied by a new introduction, this book brings the reader and word-lover some of the most charming treasures of the English language, with beautiful engravings by Granville, Durer, and others.
Jesse is the kind of callow, sly college man who has it all. he's editor of the student newspaper, enormously popular with the female students, breezing through with terrific grade. But he's oblivious to the fragile balance of life, until something unutterly strange strips way the surface clam of his existence and exposes a universe that proves uncontrollable and endlessly mutable. For Jesse has become the focus of conspiracy of creatures from beyond the end of time to re-create our universe anew. Blinded by sex and greed, Jesse can't see the terrible flaw in their vast plan...until a wonderful woman names Sully comes into his life and turns everything right side up. The result is a wild, erotic joyride, a no-holds-barred tour de force, and, finally a novel of sublime grace and beauty, a testament to the transcendent power of love.
The air in the room, where there should have been only the smell of wood smoke, was heavy with the sweet, sticky smell of blood. The sounds of the battlefield roared in her ears, the screaming of a wounded horse, the frenzied cries of fighting men who fought gladly, as if it were the only thing worth doing, the shouts of lesser men who fought because they had to, who fought to protect their farms and their small holdings.She had known men like that once, long ago. There had been no battle for more than a generation after Ashington, for as long as it took to grow new soldiers. Then it had all begun again. She knew better than to interfere this time. She wondered where the battle had been fought, and why.
"We're so alike, you and I. It's no wonder we kept finding each other." September 11, 1973: Eleven-year-old Alejandro Penda watches from his apartment window as Santiago, Chile falls to a military coup, destroying his family and his childhood. Arriving alone in America, he’s taken in by the Larks: a prominent family in the town of Guelisten. Though burdened by unresolved grief for his disappeared parents, he becomes fiercely loyal to the Larks, eventually marrying one of their daughters, Valerie. September 11, 2001: Javier Landes watches from his apartment window as New York City falls to terrorism. As one of Manhattan’s top-paid male escorts, this professional lover has never lacked for company and is loyal only to himself. But in the wake of 9/11, Jav is named guardian for an orphaned nephew in Guelisten and must open his carefully-guarded heart to pain he's long suppressed. Alex, Valerie and Jav meet first in their twenties, with a sudden attraction each finds strange and compelling. When they meet again in their forties, they discover not only is their bond still strong, but their life experiences are strangely similar. All have been shaped by separate 9/11's, and their unfinished business from the past will change everything they know about love, loyalty and friendship. "Life has rules. You cannot come in the middle of the night and take what we agreed isn't yours." Across three decades and two continents, Suanne Laqueur's fifth novel explores the unpredictability of sexual attraction, how family ties are forged, torn and mended, and how love's downfall can turn to exaltation.
A collection of ironic names for terms relating to business and finance, including "a commission of brokers" and "a crisis of middle managers"
A tribute to the art of language offers a look at configurations found in everyday homes, from a "congestion of closets" to "an ingratitude of children"
Test your skills with this fascinating collection of brain teasers in English. Variety is the key word here. A fascinating play of words that quizzes your mind and sets it ticking for a quick-fire solution to each puzzle. So sharpen your pencil and your wits, and get going with this engrossing book of delightful teasers.
Out of jurisdiction, but in his element, Madoc investigates a Welsh murder. For mounted policeman Madoc Rhys and his wife, Janet, the pains of traveling with an infant are worth taking young Dorothy to Wales for Great-Uncle Sir Caradoc's ninetieth birthday. Along with every other member of the Rhys clan, they make the pilgrimage to the ancestral pile, to enjoy a few days of drinks, dinner, and - as it turns out - demonic sacrifices. On their first morning at the family manor, Madoc stumbles upon a concussed shepherd and a dismembered ram. It appears to be a botched attempt at an ancient rite, executed by one of those Welshmen who still carry a torch for the religion of the druids. For a spot of fun, the Rhys family decides to stage its own ritual - recreating the fertility ceremony of the Beltane bonfires. But when the flames turn a member of his family into a fireball, Madoc springs to action. Even five thousand miles from Canada, a Mountie always gets his man. Review quotes. "One of the most gifted mystery authors writing today." - Sojourner: The Women's Forum. "The screwball mystery is Charlotte MacLeod's cup of tea." - Chicago Tribune. "Charlotte MacLeod does what she does better than anybody else does it; and what she does is in the top rank of modern mystery fiction." - Elizabeth Peters, creator of the Amelia Peabody series. Biographical note. Charlotte MacLeod (1922-2005) was an internationally bestselling author of cozy mysteries. Born in Canada, she moved to Boston as a child, and lived in New England most of her life. After graduating from college, she made a career in advertising, writing copy for the Stop & Shop Supermarket Company before moving on to Boston firm N. H. Miller & Co., where she rose to the rank of vice president. In her spare time, MacLeod wrote short stories, and in 1964 published her first novel, a children's book called Mystery of the White Knight. In Rest You Merry (1978), MacLeod introduced Professor Peter Shandy, a horticulturist and amateur sleuth whose adventures she would chronicle for two decades. The Family Vault (1979) marked the first appearance of her other best-known characters: the husband and wife sleuthing team Sarah Kelling and Max Bittersohn, whom she followed until her last novel, The Balloon Man, in 1998.
Mind-expanding explorations of the future of the human form Our bodies and minds are malleable, and only the imagination is the limit to the possible improvements. From genetics to artificial enhancements, humanity will alter the course of its own evolution. Included here are more than twenty stories from the most imaginative writers in the field, including: Poul Anderson * James Blish * Eric Brown * Ted Chiang * Tony Daniel * Samuel R. Delany * Greg Egan * Joe Haldeman * Geoffrey A. Landis * Paul McAuley * Ian MacLeod * David Marusek * Tom Purdom * Robert Reed * Joanna Russ * Robert Silverberg * Brian Stableford * Bruce Sterling * Charles Stross * Michael Swanwick * Liz Williams * Gene Wolfe * Roger Zelazny
17-syllabet Japanese poems about human foibles, sans season (i.e., not haiku), were introduced a half-century ago by RH Blyth in two books, "Edo Satirical Verse Anthologies" and "Japanese Life and Character in Senryu." Blyth regretted having to introduce not the best senryu, but only the best that were clean enough to pass the censors. In this anthology, compiled, translated and essayed by Robin D. Gill, like Blyth, a renowned translator of thousands of haiku, we find 1,300 of the senryu (and zappai) that would once have been dangerous to publish. The book is not just an anthology of dirty poems such as Legman's classic "Limericks" or Burford's delightful "Bawdy Verse," but probing essays of thirty themes representative of the eros - both real and imaginary - of Edo, at the time, the world's largest city. Japanese themselves use senryu for historical documentation of social attitudes and cultural practices; thousands of senryu (and the related zappai), including many poems we might consider obscene, serve as examples in the Japanese equivalent of the OED (nipponkokugodaijiten). The specialized argot, obscure allusions and ellipsis that make reading dirty senryu a delightful riddle for one who knows just enough to be challenged yet not defeated, make them impenetrable to outsiders, so this educational yet entertaining resource has not been accessible to most students of Japanese (and the limited translations prove that even professors have difficulty with it). This book tries to accomplish the impossible: it includes all the information - original poems, pronunciation, explanation, glossary - needed to help specialists improve their senryu reading skills, while refraining from full citations to leave plenty of room for the curious monolingual to skip about the eclectic goodies. [Published simultaneously with two titles as an experiment.]
The thirty stories in this collection imaginatively take us far across the universe, into the very core of our beings, to the realm of the gods, and the moment just after now. Included here are the works of masters of the form and of bright new talents, including: Paolo Bacigalupi, Stephen Baxter, Elizabeth Bear, Aliete de Bodard, James L. Cambias, Greg Egan, Charles Coleman Finlay, James Alan Gardner, Dominic Green, Daryl Gregory, Gwyneth Jones, Ted Kosmatka, Mary Robinette Kowal, Nancy Kress, Jay Lake, Paul McAuley, Ian McDonald, Maureen McHugh, Sarah Monette, Garth Nix, Hannu Rajaniemi, Robert Reed, Alastair Reynolds, Mary Rosenblum, Kristine Kathryn Rusch, Geoff Ryman, Karl Schroeder, Gord Sellar, and Michael Swanwick. Supplementing the stories are the editor's insightful summation of the year's events and a lengthy list of honorable mentions, making this book both a valuable resource and the single best place in the universe to find stories that stir the imagination, and the heart.
The greatly anticipated new novel by Norman Rush—whose first novel, Mating, won the National Book Award and was everywhere acclaimed—is his richest work yet. It is at once a political adventure, a social comedy, and a passionate triangle. It is set in the 1990s in Botswana—the African country Rush has indelibly made his own fictional territory. Mortals chronicles the misadventures of three ex-pat Americans: Ray Finch, a contract CIA agent, operating undercover as an English instructor in a private school, who is setting out on perhaps his most difficult assignment; his beautiful but slightly foolish and disaffected wife, Iris, with whom he is obsessively in love; and Davis Morel, an iconoclastic black holistic physician, who is on a personal mission to “lift the yoke of Christian belief from Africa.” The passions of these three entangle them with a local populist leader, Samuel Kerekang, whose purposes are grotesquely misconstrued by the CIA, fixated as the agency is on the astonishing collapse of world socialism and the simultaneous, paradoxical triumph of radical black nationalism in South Africa, Botswana’s neighbor. And when a small but violent insurrection erupts in the wild northern part of the country, inspired by Kerekang but stoked by the erotic and political intrigues of the American trio—the outcome is explosive and often explosively funny. Along the way, there are many pleasures. Letters from Ray’s brilliantly hostile brother and Iris’s woebegone sister provide a running commentary on contemporary life in America. Africa and Africans are powerfully evoked, and the expatriate scene is cheerfully skewered. Through lives lived ardently in an unforgiving land, Mortals examines with wit and insight the dilemmas of power, religion, rebellion, and contending versions of liberation and love. It is a study of a marriage over time, and a man’s struggle to find his way when his private and public worlds are shifting. It is Norman Rush’s most commanding work.
The next invasion won't be little green men landing their spaceship in the National Mall. It will start somewhere quiet, like a dark road at night... At the Publisher's request, this title is being sold without Digital Rights Management Software (DRM) applied.
For nearly three decades, Gardner Dozois has been presenting his weighty and eclectic annual selection of short science fiction that deserves to be better known to a wider audience. It has consistently been voted Year's Best Anthology by the readers of Locus magazine, overwhelmingly more often than any other collection. Unfailingly, Dozois's selection offers the very best stories of the year, showcasing outstanding new talents alongside acknowledged masters of the genre. This year's collection is no exception, including the work of over 30 writers, including: Robert Reed, Alastair Reynolds, Sarah Monette and Elizabeth Bear, Paul McAuley, Linda Nagata, Indrapreamit Das, Pat Cadigan, Andy Duncan, Brit Mandelo, Carrie Vaughn and many more. It includes, as ever, Dozois's magisterial summation of 2012 in SF. Praise for previous editions: This annual compilation of the previous year's best short stories and novellas, together with a comprehensive summation of the state of the genre and an extensive "honourable mentions" list, has become an institution over the past three decades. The Guardian. Quantity as well as quality . . . every piece is a treasure. The Times. For more than a quarter century, Gardner Dozois's Mammoth Book of Best New SF has defined the field. It is the most important anthology, not only annually, but overall. Charles N. Brown, publsiher of Locus Magazine. New authors rub shoulders with old hands, and strong work from relative novices Hannu Rajaniemi and Lavie Tidhar suggest that SF's future is as bright as ever. Financial Times.
Motivational speaker Allen Klein has compiled hundreds of positive passages from notable figures from Plato to Dolly Parton, Shakespeare to Jerry Seinfeld, and Walt Whitman to Oprah Winfrey. Inspiration for a Lifetime is the ultimate motivating, encouraging, and uplifting book to enjoy and share. These very wise words and affirmative sayings have the power to touch our hearts, make us laugh, alleviate our stress, while realizing the vast potential life has to offer. Grouped thematically, these quips, quotes, and "power thoughts" can help you deal with everything life throws at you, from Anger and Adversity to Worrying, and they inspire you to do everything from "Alter your attitude" to "Take the first step." Allen Klein's book of pure inspiration can help you not sweat the small stuff and lift your spirits enough to take on the big stuff of life. Are the kids driving you crazy? Are you facing a challenge? Are money matters uppermost in your mind? Perhaps you’re experiencing travel troubles, or technology is about to drive over the edge. Just open this book to your stress of the moment, and let laughter erase your tension. Categorized by stress-related themes (such as: Kids, Jobs, Spouses, even Modern Technology), just the right quote to amuse and inspire you can be found at a moment’s anxiety. Erma Bombeck on Teenagers: “Never lend your car to anyone to whom you have given birth.” Dobie Gillis on Work: “I don’t have anything against work. I just figure, why deprive somebody who really loves it?” Bill Cosby on Success and Failure: “I don’t know the key to success, but the key to failure is trying to please everybody.” Whether you want a quick pick-me-up or the perfect line for presentation or speech, you will find exactly what you need in Inspiration for a Lifetime.
When Patrick Grant meets Ella, he seizes the opportunity of a new life with her. He imagines the future with his beautiful second wife by his side: the years ahead filled with all that is bright and promising. When Ella gives birth to Daniel, Patrick’s happiness is complete. A son at last. Patrick adores Daniel: a golden child, talented, artistic, loving. And then, when Daniel is fourteen, tragedy strikes. Without warning, Patrick and Ella’s world is shattered beyond repair and Patrick is forced to re-evaluate everything: his own life, his role as husband and father, all his previous assumptions about family. Together with Ella, he is forced to embark on a voyage of discovery. He must confront uncomfortable truths about himself and about the privileged world he and his wife inhabit. This is the story of a family torn apart by conflict, suspicion and loss. It is also a story, ultimately, of redemption and forgiveness – and the strength of severely-tested family bonds.

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