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“An Experiment in Autobiography” was first published in 1934. Within it, Wells recounts his childhood, school days, struggle to make money, his eventual literary success, and latter occupation as a prophet of socialism. A fascinating and unique look into the life and mind of this seminal author, “An Experiment in Autobiography” will appeal to all who have read and loved the works of H. G. Wells. Contents include: “47 High Street, Bromley, Kent”, “Up Park and Joseph Wells (1827-1910)”, “Sarah Wells at Atlas House (1855-1880)”, “A Broken Leg and Some Books and Pictures (1874)”, “Mr. Morley's Commercial Academy (1874-1880)”, “Puerile View of the World (1878-79)”, Mrs. Wells, Housekeeper at Up Park (1880-1893)”, “First Start in Life—Windsor (Summer 1880)”, et cetera. Herbert George Wells (1866 – 1946) was a prolific English writer who wrote in a variety of genres, including the novel, politics, history, and social commentary. Today, he is perhaps best remembered for his contributions to the science fiction genre thanks to such novels as “The Time Machine” (1895), “The Invisible Man” (1897), and “The War of the Worlds” (1898). Many vintage books such as this are becoming increasingly scarce and expensive. We are republishing this book now in an affordable, modern, high-quality edition complete with a specially commissioned new biography of the author.
Written by international experts from a range of disciplines, these essays examine the uniquely British contribution to science fiction film and television. Viewing British SF as a cultural phenomenon that challenges straightforward definitions of genre, nationhood, authorship and media, the editors provide a conceptual introduction placing the essays within their critical context. Essay topics include Hammer science fiction films, the various incarnations of Doctor Who, Stanley Kubrick’s A Clockwork Orange, and such 21st-century productions as 28 Days Later and Torchwood.
Cruelty and Companionship is an account of the intimate but darker sides of marriage in Victorian and Edwardian England. Hammerton draws upon previously unpublished material from the records of the divorce court and magistrates' courts to challenge many popular views about changing family patterns. His findings open a rare window onto the sexual politics of everyday life and the routine tensions which conditioned marriage in middle and working class families. Using contemporary evidence ranging from prescriptive texts and public debate to autobiography and fiction, Hammerton examines the intense public scrutiny which accompanied the routine exposure of marital breakdown, and charts a growing critique of men's behaviour in marriage which increasingly demanded regulation and reform. The critical discourse which resulted, ranging from paternalist to feminist, casts new light on the origins and trajectory of nineteenth century feminism, legal change and our understanding of the changing expression of masculinity.
Entertaining tales from the foremost science-fiction writer of the early 20th century include the title tale, "The Star," "The New Accelerator," "The Remarkable Case of Davidson's Eyes," "Under the Knife," and others.

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