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Exploring Translation Theories presents a comprehensive analysis of the core contemporary paradigms of Western translation theory. The book covers theories of equivalence, purpose, description, uncertainty, localization, and cultural translation. This second edition adds coverage on new translation technologies, volunteer translators, non-lineal logic, mediation, Asian languages, and research on translators’ cognitive processes. Readers are encouraged to explore the various theories and consider their strengths, weaknesses, and implications for translation practice. The book concludes with a survey of the way translation is used as a model in postmodern cultural studies and sociologies, extending its scope beyond traditional Western notions. Features in each chapter include: An introduction outlining the main points, key concepts and illustrative examples. Examples drawn from a range of languages, although knowledge of no language other than English is assumed. Discussion points and suggested classroom activities. A chapter summary. This comprehensive and engaging book is ideal both for self-study and as a textbook for Translation theory courses within Translation Studies, Comparative Literature and Applied Linguistics.
This highly engaging book presents a comprehensive analysis of the key traditional and contemporary paradigms of translation theory. With examples from a range of languages and a wealth of tasks and activities, it is ideal for students at home and in class.
Professor Bassnett tackles the crucial problems of translation and offers a history of translation theory, beginning with the ancient Romans and encompassing key 20th-century structuralist work. The work includes the original text of The Seafarer.
The series serves to propagate investigations into language usage, especially with respect to computational support. This includes all forms of text handling activity, not only interlingual translations, but also conversions carried out in response to different communicative tasks. Among the major topics are problems of text transfer and the interplay between human and machine activities.
This brief monograph examines and evaluates the main ideas, techniques, findings, and pedagogical applications of Corpus-based Translation Studies. Particular attention is given to trends characterizing the expansion of the field. The book is intended for translator trainees, teachers of translation, professional translators, researchers, and scholars in translation studies. Laviosa has written extensively on issues related to translation studies. There is no index. Annotation copyrighted by Book News, Inc., Portland, OR
Presents the most important theories in Translation Studies that have emerged over the last 50 years. Particularly innovative is the inclusion of theories from outside North America and Europe, theoretical perspectives on recent technological developments and a consideration of the nature of theory in the field.
This volume addresses the role played by translation in international political communication and news reporting and brings to light the usually invisible link between politics, media, and translation. The contributors explore the interrelationship between media in the widest sense and translation, with a focus on political texts, institutional contexts, and translation policies. These topics are explored from a Translation Studies perspective, thus bringing a new disciplinary view to the investigation of political discourse and the language of the media. The first part of the volume focuses on textual analysis, investigating transformations that occur in translation processes, and the second part examines institutional contexts and policies, and their effects on translation production and reception.
This volume contains selected papers from the 4th Language International Conference on 'Teaching Translation and Interpreting: Building Bridges' which was held in Shanghai in December 1998. The collection is an excellent source of ideas and information for teachers and students alike. With contributions from five continents, the topics discussed cover a wide range, including the relevance of translation theories, cultural and technical knowledge acquisition, literary translation, translation and interpreting for the media, Internet-related training methods, and tools for student assessment. While complementing the volumes of the previous three conferences in exploring new methods and frontiers, this collection is particularly strong on case studies outside of the European and Anglo-American spheres.
This is the first English translation of the seminal book by Katharina Reiß and Hans Vermeer, Grundlegung einer allgemeinen Translationstheorie, first published in 1984. The first part of the book was written by Vermeer and explains the theoretical foundations and basic principles of skopos theory as a general theory of translation and interpreting or ‘translational action’, whereas the second part, penned by Katharina Reiß, seeks to integrate her text-typological approach, first presented in 1971, as a ‘specific theory’ that focuses on those cases in which the skopos requires equivalence of functions between the source and target texts. Almost 30 years after it first appeared, this key publication is now finally accessible to the next generations of translation scholars. In her translation, Christiane Nord attempts to put skopos theory and her own concept of ‘function plus loyalty’ to the test, by producing a comprehensible, acceptable text for a rather heterogeneous audience of English-speaking students and scholars all over the world, at the same time as acting as a loyal intermediary for the authors, to whom she feels deeply indebted as a former student and colleague.
Jean Boase-Beier's Critical Introduction To Translation Studies demonstrates a keen understanding of theoretical and practical translation. It looks to instances where translation might not be straightforward, where stylistics play an important role. Examples are discussed from works of literature, advertisements, journalism and others, where effects on the reader are central to the text, and are reflected in the style. It begins by setting out some of the basic problems and issues that arise in the study of translation, such as: the difference between literary and non-literary translation; the role of language, content and style; the question of universals and specifics in language and the notion of context. The book then goes on to focus more closely on style and how it enables us to characterise literary texts and literary translation. The final part looks at the translation of poetry. Throughout, it is conscious of the relationship between theory and practice in translation. This book offers a new approach to translation, grounded in stylistics, and it will be an invaluable resource for undergraduates and postgraduates approaching translation studies.
The premise of this volume is a question: What can the concept of minority bring to the practice and study of translation? Minority is understood here to mean a cultural or political position that is subordinate, whether the social context that so defines it is local, national or global. This position is occupied by languages and literatures that lack prestige or authority, the non-standard and the non-canonical, what is not spoken or read much by a hegemonic culture. Yet minorities also include the nations and social groups that are affiliated with these languages and literatures, the politically weak or underrepresented, the colonized and the disenfranchised, the exploited and the stigmatized. Translation today is itself a minor use of language, a lesser art, an invisible craft that commands less cultural capital and fewer legal privileges than original composition. Yet the focus in this collection is not on what translators worldwide have in common but on the distinctive forms that translating takes when it is done by or on behalf of minorities. The articles in this volume present a variety of case studies that illuminate the linguistic and cultural problems posed by such translating, as well as the economic and political agendas it has served. Together, these pieces show that the concept of minority is worth exploring because it inspires innovation in translation practice and research. Minor cultures are coincident with new translation strategies, new translation theories, and new syntheses of the diverse methodologies that constitute the discipline of translation studies.
This volume focuses on the highly debated topic of theatrical translation, one brought on by a renewed interest in the idea of performance and translation as a cooperative effort on the part of the translator, the director, and the actors. Exploring the role and function of the translator as co-subject of the performance, it addresses current issues concerning the role of the translator for the stage, as opposed to the one for the editorial market, within a multifarious cultural context. The current debate has shown a growing tendency to downplay and challenge the notion of translational accuracy in favor of a recreational and post-dramatic attitude, underlying the role of the director and playwright instead. This book discusses the delicate balance between translating and directing from an intercultural, semiotic, aesthetic, and interlingual perspective, taking a critical stance on approaches that belittle translation for the theatre or equate it to an editorial practice focused on literality. Chapters emphasize the idea of dramatic translation as a particular and extremely challenging type of performance, while consistently exploring its various textual, intertextual, intertranslational, contextual, cultural, and intercultural facets. The notion of performance is applied to textual interpretation as performance, interlingual versus intersemiotic performance, and (inter)cultural performance in the adaptation of translated texts for the stage, providing a wide-ranging discussion from an international group of contributors, directors, and translators.
During the last thirty years, the field of translation has exploded with multiple new theories. Contemporary Translation Theories examines five of new approaches – the translation workshop, the science of translation, translation studies, polysystem theory, and deconstruction – all of which began in the mid -1960s and continue to be influential today.
This volume offers a comprehensive view of current research directions in Translation and Interpreting Studies, outlining the theoretical concepts underpinning that research and presenting detailed discussions of the various methods used. Organized around three factors that are responsible for shaping the study of translation and interpreting today—post-positivist theoretical approaches, developments in the language industry, and technological innovations—this volume is divided into three parts: Part I introduces the basic concepts organizing translation and interpreting research, such as the difference between qualitative and quantitative research, between product-oriented and process-oriented studies, and between prescriptive and descriptive approaches. Part II provides a theoretical mapping of current translation and interpreting research, covering the theories underlying the current conceptualization of translation and interpreting, from queer studies to cognitive science. Part III explores the key methodological approaches to research in Translation and Interpreting Studies, including corpus-based, longitudinal, observational, and ethnographic studies, as well as survey and focus group-based studies. The international range of contributors are all leading research experts who use the methodologies in their work. They present the research aims of these methods, offer sample research questions that can—and cannot—be addressed by these methods, and discuss modes of data collection and analysis. This is an essential reference for all advanced undergraduates, postgraduates, and researchers in Translation and Interpreting Studies.
Languages have become more mobile than ever before, producing translations, transplantations, and cohabitations of all kinds. The early modern period also witnessed profound linguistic transformation, but in very different ways. Interlinguicity, Internationality, and Shakespeare undoes the illusion that Shakespeare wrote in what we now think of as English. In a series of essays approaching Shakespeare from unique and thought-provoking perspectives, contributors from history, performance criticism, and comparative literature look at "interlinguicity," the condition of being between languages, and "internationality," the condition of being between countries. Each essay focuses on local issues, such as community identification in the Netherlands of Shakespeare’s time and the appropriation of Shakespeare in German literature in the nineteenth century, to suggest that Shakespeare never wrote "in" English because English was not then, nor is it now, an intact, knowable system. Many languages existed in sixteenth-century London, and English did not have clear limits. Interlinguicity, Internationality, and Shakespeare helps to explain the hybridity that Shakespeare embraced in all his writing. Contributors include Paula Blank (College of William and Mary), Lauren Coker (Saint Louis University), Brian Gingrich (Princeton University), Alexa Huang (George Washington University), James Loehlin (University of Texas at Austin), Scott Newstok (Rhodes College), Patricia Parker (Stanford University), Elizabeth Pentland (York University), Philip Schwyzer (University of Exeter), Gary Waite (University of New Brunswick), and Robert N. Watson (University of California, Los Angeles)
Includes the contribution of Sumitra Mangesh Katre, 1906-1998 to Indian and Sanskrit lexicography.

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