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Fooled by Randomness is a standalone book in Nassim Nicholas Taleb’s landmark Incerto series, an investigation of opacity, luck, uncertainty, probability, human error, risk, and decision-making in a world we don’t understand. The other books in the series are The Black Swan, Antifragile, Skin in the Game, and The Bed of Procrustes. Fooled by Randomness is the word-of-mouth sensation that will change the way you think about business and the world. Nassim Nicholas Taleb–veteran trader, renowned risk expert, polymathic scholar, erudite raconteur, and New York Times bestselling author of The Black Swan–has written a modern classic that turns on its head what we believe about luck and skill. This book is about luck–or more precisely, about how we perceive and deal with luck in life and business. Set against the backdrop of the most conspicuous forum in which luck is mistaken for skill–the world of trading–Fooled by Randomness provides captivating insight into one of the least understood factors in all our lives. Writing in an entertaining narrative style, the author tackles major intellectual issues related to the underestimation of the influence of happenstance on our lives. The book is populated with an array of characters, some of whom have grasped, in their own way, the significance of chance: the baseball legend Yogi Berra; the philosopher of knowledge Karl Popper; the ancient world’s wisest man, Solon; the modern financier George Soros; and the Greek voyager Odysseus. We also meet the fictional Nero, who seems to understand the role of randomness in his professional life but falls victim to his own superstitious foolishness. However, the most recognizable character of all remains unnamed–the lucky fool who happens to be in the right place at the right time–he embodies the “survival of the least fit.” Such individuals attract devoted followers who believe in their guru’s insights and methods. But no one can replicate what is obtained by chance. Are we capable of distinguishing the fortunate charlatan from the genuine visionary? Must we always try to uncover nonexistent messages in random events? It may be impossible to guard ourselves against the vagaries of the goddess Fortuna, but after reading Fooled by Randomness we can be a little better prepared. Named by Fortune One of the Smartest Books of All Time A Financial Times Best Business Book of the Year
ABOUT THE BOOK When I was in school I considered a career in finance. Or to be more embarrassingly precise, I considered becoming an accountant. I chose the appropriate subjects and got myself onto a business degree course. I was still only 19 and you could say I was following a non-random course towards my career objective. But then, just months before I was supposed to start my degree course, in what might be considered random events, I became involved in newspapers and learned skills such as writing and page layout. I decided against the degree course. I managed to get some money together to launch my own publication. And I’ve been in the media ever since. I feel lucky that the circumstances that I found myself in at that time have resulted in a relatively long and moderately successful career in journalism, but I can’t help thinking that none of it was planned and, therefore, on one level, it was random. I’m not sure Nassim Taleb, author of Fooled by Randomness, would agree with me, however. In fact, even if Taleb spent a wrote book explaining his thoughts on the matter, I’m not sure that I’d completely understand it—such is the depth to which he analyses events and the complexity of his theories about said events. MEET THE AUTHOR Abdul Montaqim is a journalist, based in London, and has been working in the media since 1989. Among the more well known titles he has written for are The Guardian newspaper, Time Out magazine and the International Business Times website. He has edited a number of local and community newspapers, magazines and websites, and has, over the course of his career, worked for some of the largest publishers in Europe, including Emap, LLP and Mirror Group Newspapers. Abdul has also worked outside of the United Kingdom, moving to Abu Dhabi for a year to work on the first national daily newspaper in United Arab Emirates, The National; and he has consulted for media companies in Bangladesh, where he was born. Abdul briefly worked for a New York-headquartered cable television channel called AsiaNet as a news editor, and realised that although he loves researching, writing and other "technical" parts of a journalist's job, he does not like presenting, preferring to be behind the camera or back in the studio. He also realised that, although reporting a story through the medium of television is obviously different from telling it through a newspaper or magazine, the heart and mind of every media company is researching and writing. In his spare time, Abdul likes to spend time with his family, cooking, eating, watching films, listening to music, reading and writing. When he goes out he likes to watch movies at the best cinemas, see live music performances, and eat at good restaurants. He also loves gardening, fishing and going for long walks. EXCERPT FROM THE BOOK Taleb touches on Darwin’s theory of evolution. He does not share the widely held view that Darwinism can be applied to the business world. Meaning that he doesn’t believe that the strongest companies will survive and the weakest will become extinct. “Things are not as simple as that,” he writes. The problem, he explains, comes from randomness. “Once randomness is injected into a system... what seems to be an evolution may be merely a diversion, and possibly regression...” Buy a copy to keep reading!
QFINANCE: The Ultimate Resource (4th edition) offers both practical and thought-provoking articles for the finance practitioner, written by leading experts from the markets and academia. The coverage is expansive and in-depth, with key themes which include balance sheets and cash flow, regulation, investment, governance, reputation management, and Islamic finance encompassed in over 250 best practice and thought leadership articles. This edition will also comprise key perspectives on environmental, social, and governance (ESG) factors -- essential for understanding the long-term sustainability of a company, whether you are an investor or a corporate strategist. Also included: Checklists: more than 250 practical guides and solutions to daily financial challenges; Finance Information Sources: 200+ pages spanning 65 finance areas; International Financial Information: up-to-date country and industry data; Management Library: over 130 summaries of the most popular finance titles; Finance Thinkers: 50 biographies covering their work and life; Quotations and Dictionary.
Get Critical Insight into the Modern Patenting Scene We are now living in the "IP Era of the Information Age" where technology businesses are placing increasing emphasis on intellectual property (IP) as a way to add to their bottom lines. As a consequence, those working in a technology business or organization will inevitably be thrust into working with IP in one or more of its various forms. This increasing emphasis on IP matters requires technology workers to have at least a basic practical understanding of IP, particularly patents, so that they can effectively participate in their organizations’ IP and patenting efforts. Consider a Spherical Patent: IP and Patenting in Technology Business provides an unconventional and unvarnished examination of patents and the reality of how they are used and abused in technology business. The book starts with an overview of patents and how the patenting universe has become so complex, and warns of the danger of making "spherical," simplifying assumptions about patents and patent-related matters. It then takes a look at the cast of characters in the modern patenting world and the roles they play at the "IP Bazaar." The book goes on to explain the increasing emphasis in today’s modern IP world of leveraging patents in large collections of patents called "portfolios." The author describes how the fractal nature of innovation allows for the exponential growth of patents to densely pack an "IP space," including how this packing can exceed its normal limits and the adverse consequences. He also explores the evolution and importance of core to improvement to commercialization patents. A modern view of patents based on "quantum patent mechanics" explains some of the mysterious patent-related phenomena that are otherwise inexplicable using "classical patent mechanics." Using examples of actual patents and patent portfolios of real technology businesses, the author discusses how patenting strategies are defined based on "central organizing principles" behind why patents are being pursued. He describes the operational realities of running an internal patenting system as well as how to avoid the prevalent trap of accepting a high degree of disorder (entropy) in the business’s patenting system. He also takes a close look at other problematic areas, such as the use and abuse of provisional patent applications and how "no shame claims" can be issued by the patent office and the havoc they can create.
Robert G. Hagstrom is one of the best-known authors of investment books for general audiences. Turning his extensive experience as a portfolio manager at Legg Mason Capital Management into valuable guidance for professionals and nonprofessionals alike, he is the author of six successful books on investment, including The Warren Buffett Way, a New York Times best-seller that has sold more than a million copies. In this updated second edition of Investing: The Last Liberal Art, Hagstrom explores basic and fundamental investing concepts in a range of fields outside of economics, including physics, biology, sociology, psychology, philosophy, and literature. He discusses, for instance, how the theory of evolution disrupts the notion of the efficient market and how reading strategies for literature can be gainfully applied to investing research. Building on Charlie Munger's famous "latticework of mental models" concept, Hagstrom argues that it is impossible to make good investment decisions based solely on a strong knowledge of finance theory alone. He reinforces his concepts with additional data and a new chapter on mathematics, and updates his text throughout to reflect the developments of the past decade, particularly the seismic economic upheaval of 2008. He has also added a hundred new titles to the invaluable reading list concluding the book. Praise for the first edition: "I read this book in one sitting: I could not put it down."—Peter L. Bernstein, author of Against the Gods: The Remarkable Story of Risk "Elegant and irresistible. Robert G. Hagstrom makes the complex clear as he confidently crisscrosses through the disciplines of finance, biology, physics, and literature. The only way to understand investing better, [Investing] shows, is to understand the world better. Ideas spark off the page at every turn. This is simply a gem of a book."—James Surowiecki, New Yorker "Investing is a brisk and engaging read, and it is a pleasure to be in the presence of Hagstrom's agile mind."—International Herald Tribune
Outcomes of major league games—winning/losing margins and total points scored relative to the odds makers’ lines in baseball, basketball and football—are graphed in terms of sports metric candlestick charts and then forecast in terms of adaptive drift modeling. The charts are constructed to reveal ad hoc forecasting patterns that may contribute to effective forecasting. These patterns are then included with variables contained in major sports data bases. The augmented data bases then provide input variables in the drift modeling forecasts.

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